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Every RPM Canadian Content #1 single discussion thread 1964-2000

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by bunglejerry, Aug 17, 2020.

  1. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Catching up on a few songs, here's "Lifeline" by John Bennett, #63 back on April 14, 1973, first discussed in Post #2921:
    Every RPM Canadian Content #1 single discussion thread 1964-2000



    I was afraid the needle had managed to get stuck near the end of the song, but that's the way the song actually goes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
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  2. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
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  3. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Here's Marty Butler's "If You Wanna Go To New York City", which peaked on September 29, 1973, first discussed in Post #3129:
    Every RPM Canadian Content #1 single discussion thread 1964-2000



    The above three songs were all arranged by the previously mentioned former Motown producer/arranger Dave Van De Pitte.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
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  4. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Here's "Liza" by Joey Gregorash, which peaked on November 10, 1973, first discussed in Post #3171:
    Every RPM Canadian Content #1 single discussion thread 1964-2000

     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
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  5. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    And here's "Lord, Don't You Think It's Time" by The Bells, which peaked back on June 3, 1972, first discussed in Post#2628. I think I have a new favourite Frank Mills song, as he gets a bit gospel-y on us here.
    Every RPM Canadian Content #1 single discussion thread 1964-2000

     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
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  6. torcan

    torcan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
  7. torcan

    torcan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Wow...between this list and the one on the website, I didn't realize there were so many labels that operated in Canada over the years.
     
  8. JamieC

    JamieC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Detroit Mi USA
    It's the same everywhere. anyone with a few hundred dollars could start a label. Almost every small studio had a label, most lacked any sort of distribution and remained local. How long a label lasted was dependent on money and talent. A band or their manager pays for a package to record a single and get 500 copies to sell at shows. Like a vanity record.
    I have seen tons of Michigan labels I never heard of.
     
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  9. bunglejerry

    bunglejerry Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    151. YOU WON'T SEE ME
    by ANNE MURRAY
    CAPITOL 72727
    Highest ranking for 2 weeks: July 27 (10) and August 3 (12), 1974




    [​IMG]
    Are there any Beatles covers out there that better the Beatles originals? I guess it just comes down to who you ask... some people will say Joe Cocker doing "With a Little Help from My Friends", some people will say Stevie Wonder doing "We Can Work It Out"...

    Legend has it that John Lennon considered Anne Murray's take on "You Won't See Me" to be the best Beatles cover ever. Or at least legend has it he said that at some point, perhaps to Murray herself. Lennon said a lot of things... I'm not quite ready to throw my lot in with Lennon on this one, but it is indeed a very good take.

    The Beatles rush-recorded "You Won't See Me" in two takes on 11 November 1965, the last day of recording for Rubber Soul. Lyrically, it's a bitter screed from Paul McCartney to then-girlfriend Jane Asher, who were having relationship problems at the time. Musically, for all of the rushed circumstances of the song's genesis, the Beatles give an excellent Motown-based performance (featuring their roadie playing a single note on a Hammond organ continuously for fifty seconds).

    Anne Murray's performance keeps the four-on-the-floor feel while losing much of the Motown influence. A different and more active piano part is substituted and, of course, the most comically overdriven bass guitar in recorded history serves as the main instrument (and musical highlight as far as I'm concerned). Strings take the place of the roadie, and subtle brass stabs thicken the arrangement. Anne Murray sings the song very well, as usual, but there's nothing in the song that serves her voice particularly well. It could be anyone singing.

    And speaking of voices... what ultimately makes me not fully able to agree with John Lennon here is the background vocals, which are overbearing and out of place. All three of the vocalists - Dianne Brooks, Laurel Ward and Lee Harris - were Canadian singers of note, each of whom had a recording career of their own. It's nothing against them so much as the arrangement and their placement in the mix. Ultimately, it is one of two factors that make the cover less-than-perfect. The other factor is the entirely unnecessary length of the song as it appears on the Love Song album and, more crucially, on Anne Murray's Greatest Hits. The album version is longer than four minutes and has become tiresome by its conclusion. The single is almost a full minute shorter and much punchier, ultimately a more enjoyable listen. Unfortunately, the only upload to Youtube of that version is a scratchy and lo-fi needledrop, which I've linked above.

    In the context of Murray's career to date, "You Won't See Me" was an unusual, if not risky, choice for a single. Murray was a self-confessed Beatles fanatic who just might have covered more Lennon/McCartney songs than Kenny Loggins songs. But to date she'd had her best successes on the Adult Contemporary and Country charts, and "You Won't See Me" was neither of those things. I'm not sure how much thought, initially, Capitol gave to the choice of b-side. While the Love Song album was already released and happily sitting in stores, Capitol took not from that album but from the previous album, Danny's Song - the half-studio/half-live album that had already generated two number one singles. The song was a regendered version of George Jones' 1962 hit "She Thinks I Still Care". Anne sings it quite faithfully, pure country. Her glistening voice shines much brighter on this recording than on the purported a-side.

    The reason I'm talking about this year-old b-side is that, originally by accident but later by Capitol design, "He Thinks I Still Care" was pushed to country stations as the plug side. The ruse certainly worked; while it only rose as high as number 11 on the Canadian country chart, it remarkably rose to number one on the Billboard country chart for two weeks. It was her first of ten number ones on the Billboard country chart, though number two wouldn't come along until 1979. Given that "You Won't See Me" also rose to number one in the USA, this time on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, I suppose I shouldn't keep saying that Canadians hit number one on Billboard five times in 1974; I should be saying seven times. Or maybe not... taking a look at it, there were six Canadian number ones on the Billboard AC chart in 1974, including four that didn't top the Hot 100. So that's... ten Canadian number ones on Billboard in a single calendar year?

    Capitol put out "You Won't See Me" with "He Thinks I Still Care" on the flip in Canada, the USA, the UK, France, Germany and Australia. To ensure their marketing plan took root, Capitol USA also pressed promos featuring "You Won't See Me" on both sides (stereo and mono) for pop radio and promos featuring "He Thinks I Still Care" on both sides (stereo and mono) for country radio. New Zealand and the Netherlands also got Capitol releases of "You Won't See Me" but with different b-sides: "Son of a Rotten Gambler" and "Love Song", respectively. Those two countries also got the longer album version, while everyone else got the shorter single edit.

    FRANCE:

    [​IMG]

    GERMANY:

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    And another variant of the U.S. label (besides on that video clip):
    [​IMG]
    Took awhile for US Capitol to get to speed on the reorganization of its Canadian cousin, if label copy was of any indication; here is where it finally coalesced.
     
  11. bare trees

    bare trees Senior Member

    Nothing could top the original but Anne's version is pleasant. I do agree that that the background singers are a little too intrusive. It wouldn't have hurt to lower them in the mix or given them fewer parts to sing.
     
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  12. Paul C

    Paul C Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Some doofus uploaded a much better sounding single version to Youtube a couple of days ago but then accidentally made it 'unlisted', meaning it doesn't show up in searches.


    Although "You Won't See Me" wasn't the top Canadian song on the chart until July 27 (when it sat at #10), it had actually reached its peak of #5 back on June 22 (but wasn't the top Canadian song thanks to Mr. Lightfoot). Both Canadian and US singles state 'stereo'. The US single is in fact mono. I don't know about the Canadian single.


    One version of the legend has it that Lennon made the comment to Murray backstage at the Grammys, but he may have just been chatting up a blonde. (The song was written entirely by Paul McCartney and Lennon's involvement in the Beatles' recording was minimal.)

    When "He Thinks I Still Care" hit #1 on Billboard's country chart, Anne Murray became only the second Canadian artist to top that chart. By my count, only five Canadian acts have ever topped the Billboard country chart since it was introduced as a jukebox chart in 1944: Hank Snow, Anne Murray, Shania Twain, Terri Clark, and the band Emerson Drive. (It was not until more than half a century after the introduction of the chart that a Canadian not from Nova Scotia would top the chart.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2021
  13. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Ms. Murray wasn't the only person to change the "genders" on "___ Thinks I Still Care." Connie Francis did likewise in 1962.
     
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  14. 7solqs4iago

    7solqs4iago Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    i can't dispute that

    but having worked both sides, even if both are working in 100% good faith (it does happen) it's hard enough to get to an agreement of real definitions, or to confirm the route from $$$ taken to $$$ paid to the big company
     
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  15. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  16. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    With Chicago on their TV special Meanwhile Back At The Ranch (August 16, 1974)



    British TV from 1975
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJf3jy0scIE

    Another live version
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfyHveEjJHc

    At the Quebec Winter Carnival in the early 1980s
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pe2odZyzU7U

    With the Boston Pops
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wglMbeCmbmw

    With Dionne Warwick in on Solid Gold in 1986
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lC-p_cuXRoo

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The flip side of Anne Murray | Maclean's | NOVEMBER 1974

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    At #91 the week of July 27, David Clayton-Thomas with "Anytime Babe" b/w "Take The Money And Run". Neither is on Youtube.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Clayton-Thomas left Blood, Sweat & Tears at the start of 1972. His self-titled album was released later in 1972 (#42 week of May 27, eight week chart run) with two charting singles, neither with a MAPL wheel:

    [​IMG]

    "Sing A Song" b/w "We're All Meat From The Same Bone" reached #53 week of May 6, with picture sleeves galore



    Germany

    [​IMG]

    Portugal

    [​IMG]
     
  18. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    French picture sleeve

    [​IMG]

    Netherlands

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    "Magnificent Sanctuary Band" b/w "North Beach Racetrack" peaked at #56 (week of June 10, 1972)



    Portugal picture sleeve

    [​IMG]

    Spain

    [​IMG]
     
  19. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    His next album, Tequila Sunrise, was released later in 1972.

    [​IMG]

    His first album for RCA Victor would be the third self-titled LP of his career.


    [​IMG]

    "Harmony Junction" (B-side of "Hernando's Hideaway") from it would reach #10 on RPM's Pop Music Playlist (week of August 25, 1973)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhJecq8YdII

    Netherlands picture sleeve

    [​IMG]

    Spain

    [​IMG]

    Japan

    [​IMG]

    Appearance on the British TV show It's Lulu (October 27, 1973) where he sings "You've Made Me So Very Happy" and duets with Lulu on "She" (by Gram Parsons who died shortly before this broadcast)
    https://youtu.be/ZAP-ZuBclns?t=559

    After all that, it was back to Blood, Sweat & Tears in 1974
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2021
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  20. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    At #31 for the first of two weeks the week of August 3, Gary And Dave with "It Might As Well Rain Until September". It was #17 at CHUM, #19 at CKLG (Vancouver) and #23 at CKLW (Windsor).



    The B-side "September Lady Theme"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Paoulwdm5o4

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Their second album would be released later in 1974
     
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  21. JamieC

    JamieC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Detroit Mi USA
    Another I remember well. IIRC Roy Clark did a country version, DCT owns this song.
     
  22. bunglejerry

    bunglejerry Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    152. TAKIN' CARE OF BUSINESS
    by BACHMAN-TURNER OVERDRIVE
    MERCURY M-73487
    Highest ranking for 1 week: August 10 (13), 1974




    [​IMG]

    Just look anywhere on the internet that BTO is being discussed, and inevitably you'll hear the phrase "working-class" used to describe them - and, more interestingly, their music. It raises an interesting question of what exactly "working-class music" is. Historically in Europe, we use the words "classical" and "folk" to discuss the musical tastes of the upper and lower classes, and more recently we use the words "Blur" and "Oasis" to do the same. Implied is, I think, a relative lack of musical sophistication: 4/4 verse-chorus-verse structures, simple chord patterns, vocal melodies that don't stray far from the tonic. Music designed not to challenge but merely to entertain. While Bachman is a long-standing fan of jazz as fancy chords, most of his classics in the BTO era really eschew that for a kind of artless groove. All of the trucking references in BTO's career make sense; this music really plods on like an 18-wheeler. But is that working-class?

    "Takin' Care of Business" is a song that took Randy Bachman years to write. Ironically in the fact of my previous paragraph, it originated as a Guess Who song called "White-Collar Worker". He was inspired by the workaday routine of a studio engineer the band was working with. In its embryonic form, "White-Collar Worker" was apparently too derivative of the Beatles' "Paperback Writer" to be recorded, and Randy sat on it for a few years before cracking it out live on stage with BTO, the simple chant of a chorus a last-minute addition. Its ecstatic reception that evening demonstrated that Randy had stumbled onto something special.

    Ultimately, of course, "Takin' Care of Business" presents the life of a rock musician as an escape from the drudgery of a nine-to-five lifestyle. The lyrics would seem gloating if it weren't for the sense that Brandy and the boys weren't quite as idle as the tongue-in-cheek lyrics suggest (they played a 300-gig year around this time) and had actually gotten where they were through hard work and drudgery. Still, Randy had the bona fides to sing the song. The public might have been less charitable had, say, Coldplay sung it. In any case, the song was a self-fulfilling prophecy; until the breakthrough this song heralded, BTO as a business entity were burning a hole in Randy's pocket as he subsidised Turner and his brothers through his "American Woman" money.

    "Takin' Care of Business" has a decently chunky earworm riff, distorted throughout unlike "Let it Ride". Robbie plays his rigidly unswinging four-on-the-floor stomp from start to finish (before he became a reactionary blowhard, Dennis Miller had a good bit about how white people dance that he illustrated with this song). To the extent that BTO had clearly found a workable "sound" and formula, there are two sound elements that differentiate this song from the ones that preceded it: the piano and the vocals. Both are worth discussing.

    The facts about the piano part on "Takin' Care of Business" are as follows: It was played by a man named Norman Durkee. It was a spontaneous addition, instigated through a chance meeting when Durkee happened to be in the same building in Seattle where BTO were recording their album. Past that, stories appear to diverge. Bachman has told his legendary story countless times, that the piano part was played by the pizza delivery guy who volunteered to add piano to the song he overheard at the door. However, Durkee was an accomplished studio musician who worked mostly in advertising jingles and was very probably in the studio complex for a different session. The notion that BTO management needed to scour the local pizza joints the next week to credit and pay the man must surely be an exercise in the art of a good yarn, but it is possible that Durkee knocked on the Canadian band's studio in an act of neighbourly kindness with some extra pizza left over from his own session. In any case, the driving, good-natured piano line does indeed add an extra element to the song. It's nothing mind-blowing, but it suits the mood of the song just fine.

    Now, if some stranger in the studio is playing piano, who is singing? Well, for the first time on a single a-side, the singer is - shockingly - Randy Bachman himself. I say 'shockingly' because Bachman was notoriously shy and self-conscious of his own vocal instrument. This explains, of course, the presence of Chad Allan, Burton Cummings and C.F. Turner on stage at various points in his career. Bachman's first solo project was an instrumental album. While Randy surely saw himself as the eternal sideman, the obvious truth is that he was the leader and the band's main draw. And his name came first in the band's name! It was perhaps inevitable that he would be called upon to stand behind a mic, and in this particular case, it was C.F. Turner who made the decision, telling Randy he would need to take a vocal break during upcoming concerts and that "Takin' Care of Business" would be the perfect opportunity. Randy had sung backup on any number of songs in all three of his bands and had even made a few attempts at lead vocals on the first Brave Belt album. He could carry a tune, but his voice was thin and nasal, especially compared to Allan, Cummings and Turner, the lead vocalists he had worked with.

    What Randy's voice did have, however, was character and forthrightness. Not to mention an everyman's approachability in spades. BTO's two biggest hits (we'll speak about the other one pretty soon) were both sung by Randy, and I think you could argue that the songs wouldn't quite work as well with any other voice. The working-class dreams he's evoking here would seem insincere coming from a schooled and trained voice.

    While "Takin' Care of Business" stalled just shy of the top ten in the USA and Australia (12 and 14, respectively), up here the song tied "Let it Ride" by making it to number three. The reason I'm celebrating it as a one-week "number one" with a number thirteen position is that it had the bad luck to get stuck behind another Canadian song as it was reaching its peak. The week it sat at number three (August 24), that other song sat at number two.

    Radio was issued a 3:13 edited version, but the commercial single contained the 4:51 full-length album version of this song. With the 5:36 "Stonegates" on the b-side, this is a single that lasts over ten minutes, only half a minute shorter than the second side of Randy Bachman's second full-length album Hey Ho (What You Do to Me!). Mercury put the single out in quite an impressive range of countries: Canada, the USA, Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Greece, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru and the UK. Impressive, though pretty soon that will look like nothing special.

    GERMANY:

    [​IMG]

    JAPAN:

    [​IMG]

    NETHERLANDS (1976 issue):

    [​IMG]

    FRANCE:

    [​IMG]
     
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  23. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    And here's the U.S. Columbia Pitman pressing of "Takin' Care Of Business":
    [​IMG]
    As events would develop, this would be the one that was on Billboard's Hot 100 chart the longest.
     
  24. Mr. D

    Mr. D Forum Resident

    Special resonance for me. TCOB (and the Night Chicago Died by Paper Lace) were the first pieces of music I owned. Still have those 45's kicking around.

    Good write-up, as always, @bunglejerry
     
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  25. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    Live version introduced by Keith Moon ABC In Concert (November 8, 1974)



    1975 (from the 1976 CBC documentary)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y-_WGjZgD8

    DOA version with a Randy Bachman cameo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXKjLZumm5s

    B-side "Stonegates"
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kB0eoEVlN0

    It hit #1 in several U.S. markets: New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Boston, Seattle, Denver, San Diego, Chicago, Kansas City, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Akron, Buffalo, Sioux Falls, Tucson, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Milwaukee, Madison, Bakersfield, Dayton and Pawtucket. #1 at CHUM for five weeks and four weeks at hometown CKLG, the #5 song for 1974 at CKGM in Montreal. At Capitol Radio in London U.K. it topped the charts for two weeks, five weeks at the top at Springbok Radio in Johannesburg and for one week at LM Radio, Lourenco Marques, Mozambique

    From Beetle magazine

    [​IMG]

    As you may have noticed in the videos, the band had a new guitarist, who didn't play on the record, recruited from a local band (which shared the same management).

    [​IMG]
     
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