Favorite Painting of All Time

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Gallileo, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. Hadean75

    Hadean75 Forum Moonlighter

    I think I said another painting previously, but if I'm being honest with myself it's definitely this one:

    La Grande Famille (The Great Family)
    by Rene Magritte
    1963


    [​IMG]

    Link: The Large Family, 1963 by Rene Magritte
     
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  2. longdist01

    longdist01 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Chicago, IL USA
    Steeds of Apollo ~ Lumen Winter

    [​IMG]
    Capt. James A. Lovell Federal Healthcare Ctr, N. Chicago
    "Lumen Winter 1969". "Steeds of Apollo" depicts the myth of Apollo and his task to pull the sun across the sky. Apollo 13 Commander James Lovell gives the back story: "The artist Lumen Winter was commissioned in 1969 by the St. Regis Hotel in New York to paint the mural. For many years it graced the main lounge of the hotel. Because our lunar space flights were named 'Apollo' we asked Lumen Winter to design a patch for our 1970 Apollo 13 space flight based on the Apollo legend. He centered the insignia around the three main horses from his mural..." Other than the large 20' x 8' original mural which now hangs at the Capt. James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago along with the quote by Lovell: "l have seen the Earth as it truly is...A grand oasis in the vastness of space..."

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2021
  3. Hadean75

    Hadean75 Forum Moonlighter

    Very cool! :agree:

    The Apollo 13 patch emblem was also just used in the Artemis "Name the Moonikin Challenge." It was named "Commander Moonikin Campos" in honor of Arturo Campos, electrical power subsystem manager for the Apollo 13 lunar module.

    https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/...lying-around-moon-on-nasa-s-artemis-i-mission

    https://www.nasa.gov/namethemoonikin
    [​IMG]

    Fun fact (for me anyways lol):
    My grandfather graduated high school with Fred Haise.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2021
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  4. Manimal

    Manimal Forum Resident

    Location:
    Southern US
    Maybe Conan the Barbarian by Frazetta. “It’s HIM!” My young mind said when I got the paperback from my brother.
     
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  5. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    A few landscape paibtings by C. W. Eckersberg are matching my mood at the moment. But really, all of his work is worth admiring.
     
  6. LarsO

    LarsO Forum Resident

    First that I thought of. This image is nothing compared to seeing it live:

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    Really getting into Maria Helena Vieira da Silva's work currently. She seemed to get the right colours to look perfect.
     
  8. Captain Groovy

    Captain Groovy Senior Member

    Location:
    Freedonia, USA
    Here's Claude Monet's La Grenouillere, 1869

    One of my favorites from the greatest - I took this pic a couple of weeks ago at the MOMA in NYC.

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: It's hung just fine, it's me that's off.
     
  9. rmath84

    rmath84 Forum Resident

    I saw reproductions of this lots of times but when I saw the real "Starry Night" it was fabulous.
     
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  10. Tom Slick

    Tom Slick Forum Resident

    Location:
    Venice, Italy
    This.

    As I like to say, when you "breath the same air" of the painting or the artwork in general, it's a completely different thing, and it doesn't matter how many times you saw it in reproductions and how well you (or you thought you) knew it.
    It's always like magic (at least for me).

    For example, recently we went in a church in Venice, "Santa Maria Gloriosa Dei Frari", where there are two paintings by the great Titian: one, the most famous, is "The Assumption Of The Virgin":
    [​IMG]
    ( Assumption of the Virgin (Titian) - Wikipedia )

    Of course, it is absolutely wonderful; but, since it is behind the altar, you can see it from a distance, about 6/7 meters. It still is absolutely wonderful.

    In the same church there is another one by Titian, the "Pesaro Madonna":
    [​IMG]
    ( Pesaro Madonna - Wikipedia )

    And this one you can almost touch it. There are no reproductions that can make you feel the "magic" of the blue of the dress of Saint Peter, or the red (the famous "Titian's Red", il "Rosso Tiziano") of Jacopo Pesaro, the man kneeling on the bottom right (and the painting's commisioner), or the perfection of perspectives...
    I could have stood there for hours.
    Cheery on top, please note the kid near Jacopo Pesaro: he is staring at you wherever you go. Almost hypnotic.
     
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  11. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    It could be said about many artworks I'm sure, but with Van Gogh it really does ring true about the importance of seeing an original painting in the flesh due to the composition and density of his thick brushstrokes.
     
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  12. Doctorbox4

    Doctorbox4 Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    I stayed in a hotel recently where there were about a dozen spoof/pastiche paintings by famous artists hung along the main corridor, like this one...

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Doctorbox4

    Doctorbox4 Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    Rembrandt's The Night Watch is a favourite and especially fascinating to see it in such detail. Keep clicking/tapping the image to repeatedly zoom in to see individual brush stroke detail. I’ve mentioned this before in another thread but here seems a more appropriate place.

    The Night Watch in hyper-resolution
     
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  14. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre Forum Resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    My favorite is A SUNDAY AFTERNOON ON THE ISLAND OF GRAND. It was the painting I remembered most when I first visited the ART INSTITUTE in Chicago as a boy. It is a painting that you have to appreciate in person.

    NIGHTHAWKS was another one of my favorite. I used to daydream what it would be to go to a one-arm joint like that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
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  15. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre Forum Resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    I really like portraits, too.
    GIRL WITH A PEARL EARING BY VERMEER
    PINKIE BY THOMAS LAWRENCE AND THE BLUE BOY BY THOMAS GAINSBOURGH
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
  16. Randall DeBouvre

    Randall DeBouvre Forum Resident

    Location:
    Illinois
    Finally, I love the simplicity and bright colors of Henri Matisse Dance (1910)
     
  17. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    A very talented artist was Matisse. He captured the mood perfectly.
     
  18. EdgardV

    EdgardV ®

    Location:
    USA
    Particularly, I find the water sublime.
     
  19. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    I've been reading about the artist Emil Nolde, and I love his work. But it's interesting how (like many others) his personal life, and in his case his political stance, has affected how his art is seen.

    If his paintings are not relevant to his controversial background, should it change the perception of the artworks?

    I think it's very hard see a painting and not consider the artist that created it.
     
  20. Jamsterdammer

    Jamsterdammer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Amsterdam
    That's always been a hard question to answer. Personally, I try to separate the art from the artist as much as I can as otherwise there are too many great artists whose work I would no longer be able to enjoy. For example, I adore Wagner's operas, but are well-aware of his anti-Semitism. I also love Italian Futurist paintings of the early 20th century, but know that several of the artists admired Mussolini and Italian fascism. My favorite painter of all time is Picasso, but of course he was a bullying misogynist. Regarding Nolde, as a big fan of Expressionism, I prefer to judge his art on its artistic merit, not the man's politics. It is hard to appreciate, more than a century later, the profound impact on Europe of WWI and its aftermath, when all the old certainties seemed to have vanished. That is not to justify anyone's political choices, let alone deeds, but those turbulent times produced some of the most incredible art ever made. Anyway, Nolde got his comeuppance when the Nazis rejected his art and forbade him to paint in 1941.
     
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  21. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    Cheers for the reply.

    You make excellent points that I agree with very much. It is hard, especially with different times not being as relatable as the current moment in terms of expectations and judgement.
     
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  22. I had not heard of Caspar David Friedrich's Monk By The Sea until a few days ago-can you spell 'delinquent'?:)(Thanx to the FB CDF group though). It has already made an impression on me. Some thoughts of others:
     
  23. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    I love the atmosphere. The mood and textures remind me of a Turner painting in a lot of ways.
     
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  24. Fremad

    Fremad Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    At the moment?

    The Ambassadors by Hans Holbein the Younger.

    The composition IMO with colours and symbolism is hard yet inviting.
     
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  25. Jamsterdammer

    Jamsterdammer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Amsterdam
    I agree. A total masterpiece, with one of the most striking examples of anamorphosis in painting. Let's have a picture of the painting. You can detect the skull looking at your screen from the right upper corner, but it doesn't work very well on a computer screen. O well, people just have to visit the National Gallery then.

    [​IMG]
     
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