Feet to mount on a butcher block platform

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Glfrancis2, Oct 13, 2021.

  1. Glfrancis2

    Glfrancis2 Overworked and underpaid state employee Thread Starter

    Location:
    Birmingham al
    Suggestions for feet? Perhaps adjustable if it needs to be leveled.
     
  2. Danmar

    Danmar Forum Resident

    Under my Cornwall's, I use 4" Maple with Mapleshades Heavy feet
    My B&W's, I have 3" Maple with 3/8 Maple wood caps.
    On my components, 2" Maple platforms w/Mapleshades sure feet.
    My TT platform, 4'' Maple w/SVS Soundpath subwoofer feet, to help with footfall.
     
  3. BrentB

    BrentB Urban Angler

    Location:
    Midwestern US
    [​IMG]
    Archery "field points". Various sizes and weights. Can be threaded into wood or get some inserts at the hardware store.
     
  4. Erocka2000

    Erocka2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    What are you putting on the butcher block? That will determine if you want to couple it (via spikes) to whatever the butcher block is going on top of, or isolate it (via some form of isolating feet). If it's for a turntable, I would not use spikes.
     
    jupiterboy and Lowrider75 like this.
  5. Glfrancis2

    Glfrancis2 Overworked and underpaid state employee Thread Starter

    Location:
    Birmingham al
    Yamaha a-s801, manley chinook, pioneer pl-600, gold note ds10....but not on the same piece of butcher block
     
    hi_watt likes this.
  6. Erocka2000

    Erocka2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    Honestly, I would use isolating feet of some sort any of those pieces of gear (but to perfectly honest, outside of a turntable and maybe a cd player, I don't think any of the other equipment truly needs to be isolated).
     
    Rich-n-Roll likes this.
  7. aunitedlemon

    aunitedlemon Music is medicine, dose often.

    bru87tr and Johnny Vinyl like this.
  8. Glfrancis2

    Glfrancis2 Overworked and underpaid state employee Thread Starter

    Location:
    Birmingham al
    Possible overkill..
     
    WDeranged likes this.
  9. C10

    C10 eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we may die

    Location:
    SOCO, CA
    Herbie's Grungebusters underneath the platform and Tenderfeet underneath the components.
     
    33na3rd and ayrehead like this.
  10. action pact

    action pact Music Omnivore

    I just use appliance isolation blocks, but be aware that the rubber stains wood, so put a piece of paper on top and bottom.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. McGruder

    McGruder Eternal Musicphile

    Location:
    Maryland
    Herbie’s Fat Dots for general purpose. The Isoacoustic Orea’s are very good if you want more isolation of something important, like digital disc player or DAC prone to jitter. I like them better than StillPoints, which are also good.

    Herbie's Fat Dot
     
    33na3rd likes this.
  12. Lowrider75

    Lowrider75 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    It's most important to isolate the DAC. Herbies fat dots under the platform, BDR Cones mk3 under the DAC. (Or Isoacoustic Orea’s). Same for Manley.
    BDR - CONES | Shop Music Direct

    Always soft, compliant device under the platform, hard or firm footers between component and butcher block.
     
    jupiterboy likes this.
  13. Doctor Fine

    Doctor Fine Meat and Potatoes all day long

    I put falsies underneath the wood cutting board platform my Pioneer and Technics turntables ride on.
    [​IMG]

    With my cheap Fluance RT82 turntable the supplied screw in rubber feet were junky so I totally unscrewed them and placed falsies up under the Fluance so it is DOUBLE floating in space on falsies.
    [​IMG]

    Doing so decouples the bass coming off my subwoofers (I use FOUR subs out in the big room).
    It also seems to help dampen the tonearm/plinth resonance and improves clarity in general.
    And watching the entire mass of my tables jiggling and free floating is kind of sexy...

    PS they go for a few bucks on Amazon.
    Listed under "bikini fillers."
    Don't laugh because this is the most effective way to float a table I have found in over 50 years of setting them up!

    If you use one pair for each corner you can raise the table by sliding the falsies together or moving them slightly apart so they are lower.
    I can get it so I use very little of the Technics own adjustability as the falsies have already leveled the platform for the most part.
    I trust the falsies more than I trust Technics somewhat wobbly screw on footers.

    The particular table that uses two per corner is out where the four subs are located.
    The extra isolation is much appreciated.
    By the way I can hit way over 100dB before any hint of rumble feedback!
    This WORKS!
     
    rednedtugent and McGruder like this.
  14. Wayne Nielson

    Wayne Nielson Forum Resident

    Location:
    My House
    I use wine corks cut to about 3/8" height and glue them to the bottom. Works great and cork is a great vibration absorber (along with the maple).
     
    Rich-n-Roll, izeek and BrentB like this.
  15. Glfrancis2

    Glfrancis2 Overworked and underpaid state employee Thread Starter

    Location:
    Birmingham al
    And if you run out of feet...drink more wine! :D
     
    Wayne Nielson likes this.
  16. bever70

    bever70 It's all about the soundstage

    Location:
    Belgium
    Best isolation I have tried and use under my wood platforms is this :
    [​IMG]
    Heavy, dense acoustic foam (available in hardware stores). Cut a panel up in as many, as big, as small as you want and put some blocks under the wood. I hear absolutely nothing when I put my ear on the plarforms while I beat/knock on my cabinet.
     
    izeek, Doctor Fine and Fender Relic like this.
  17. unclefred

    unclefred Coastie with the Moastie

    Location:
    Oregon Coast
    A sheet of sorbothane can be found on the cheap and you can cut it to the sizes desired.
     
  18. Lowrider75

    Lowrider75 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Sorbethane will deaden the bass by absorbing low frequencies. Bass will be less extended, softer, and have less slam.
    A more dense material should be used; eg, Vibrapods, Herbies Tenderfeet. Also, over time Sorbethane will leave a film on the bottom of a heavy component and it's platform or shelf.
     
  19. Lowrider75

    Lowrider75 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    The choices are to either drain the vibrations (using cones) or decouple the component from its shelf or base (Stillpoints, Vibrapods, Isoacoustics).
     
  20. Doctor Fine

    Doctor Fine Meat and Potatoes all day long

    It's all a matter of proportion in my experience.
    YES, you can deaden the bass by using too spongy of a material under a turntable.
    However that turntable really deserves to sit on a large heavy mass like a ten pound cutting board.---minimum.
    This will let you put something spongy UNDERNEATH the platform board while still allowing the turntable a solid footing to provide strong bass.
    You typically need to address BOTH concerns---decoupling AND good solid bass can exist at the same time!

    Sometimes you wind up making a judgement call as to your own priorities in the matter,
    I own a cheap little Fluance RT82 and put spongy stuff right under the table after taking off the loose rattling "feet" it was using to sit on and adjust the platter level.
    Yes, I lost a bit of bass in the process by muffling the entire turntable body---BUT I also killed a ton of resonance that made the midrange sound congested.

    So in my experience nothing beats a little experimentation.
    And sometimes the best performance is a compromise!
     
    Ilusndweller, Ingenieur and Dream On like this.
  21. bever70

    bever70 It's all about the soundstage

    Location:
    Belgium
    With amps too (using sorbothane or something similar under a butchers block where the amp is sitting on) ?
     
  22. Doctor Fine

    Doctor Fine Meat and Potatoes all day long

    I have sheets of stuff similar to this.
    I also don't throw out the styrofoam sheet packing that comes with shipping boxes.
    It can sometimes be a nice "differently tuned" isolation material.
    Isolation can sometimes improve by MIXING materials together to attack different sets of problems at different frequencies!
    Low bass feed back is DIFFERENT from a high pitched squeal of feedback.

    I also sometimes use woven fiberglas scrub pads to break up spillover reflection between tweeters/woofers and nearby cabinets.
    And Sonex---I might as well own stock in the company as I have test panels (12 of them) plus a couple boxes of fresh panels sitting unused until the next time I need them.

    THIS kind of intensive attention to setup detail is where the BIG improvements come from in our hobby.
    NOT spending money!
    Using your skill!
    And using stuff that lets your setup run hot and full without coloration!
     
  23. J.D.80

    J.D.80 Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    What are the blocks being set on? A rack? A floor?
     
  24. Glfrancis2

    Glfrancis2 Overworked and underpaid state employee Thread Starter

    Location:
    Birmingham al
    A rack
     
  25. Boltman92124

    Boltman92124 Fish tacos.

    Location:
    San Diego
    I thought the wood base/block was supposed to isolate? Why the need for a block then if you have to add isolation feet?
     
    timind likes this.

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