Final Curtain (the Visual Arts obituary thread)*

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by JozefK, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Franco Zeffirelli, directed ‘Romeo and Juliet,’ dies at 96

    ROME — Italian director Franco Zeffirelli, who delighted audiences around the world with his romantic vision and extravagant productions, most famously captured in his cinematic “Romeo and Juliet” and the miniseries “Jesus of Nazareth,” died Saturday at 96.

    While Zeffirelli was most popularly known for his films, his name was also inextricably linked to the theater and opera. He produced classics for the world’s most famous opera houses, from Milan’s venerable La Scala to the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and plays for London and Italian stages.

    Zeffirelli’s son Luciano said his father died at home in Rome.

    ”He had suffered for a while, but he left in a peaceful way,” he said.​

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  2. bekayne

    bekayne Forum Resident

    Susan Bernard Dead: ‘Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!’ Actress Was 71 – Deadline
     
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  3. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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  4. Django

    Django Forum Resident

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  5. swandown

    swandown Under Assistant West Coast Forum Resident

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  6. Django

    Django Forum Resident

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  7. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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  8. Django

    Django Forum Resident

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  9. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Edward Lewis, Producer of 'Spartacus,' 'Missing' and 'Grand Prix,' Dies at 99

    Edward Lewis, who helped break the Hollywood Blacklist by employing Dalton Trumbo on Spartacus and shared an Oscar nomination with his wife, Mildred Lewis, for producing Costa-Gavras' Missing, has died. He was 99.

    Edward Lewis, who helped break the Hollywood Blacklist by employing Dalton Trumbo on Spartacus and shared an Oscar nomination with his wife, Mildred Lewis, for producing Costa-Gavras' Missing, has died. He was 99.

    Lewis died July 27 at his home in Los Angeles, his daughter Susan Lewis told The Hollywood Reporter. Mildred died April 7 at age 98, Susan also revealed, and she was his "indispensable partner" for 73 years as they worked together on movies, musicals and novels.

    Edward Lewis also produced or executive produced nine films directed by John Frankenheimer, including the classics Seven Days in May (1964), Seconds (1966) — he hired blacklisted actor John Randolph on that one — and Grand Prix (1966).

    For Spartacus (1960), Lewis arranged for Trumbo to write the screenplay, based on the 1951 novel by Howard Fast (like Trumbo, Fast also was blacklisted), with the producer serving as Trumbo's "front" as he presented the script to Universal Studios. (The screenwriter had been writing under pseudonyms for years.)

    Only after Universal had spent $8 million making the movie did Lewis reveal the true author of the screenplay. When the studio agreed to the proper credit, Trumbo wrote that Lewis had "risked his name to help a man who'd lost his name."

    Spartacus star Kirk Douglas, who executive produced the film through his Bryna Productions, also receives a wealth of credit in getting Trumbo his due. Lewis, however, did not go to any lengths to publicize his role. "It was part of his dignity and the values that he had," his daughter said.

    Other Lewis-produced films written by Trumbo included The Last Sunset (1961), Lonely Are the Brave (1962) — those two, like Seven Days in May, starred Douglas, too — and Executive Action (1973).

    He and his wife produced Missing (1982), which starred Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek and earned writer-director Costa-Gavras an Oscar for adapted screenplay. The thriller won the Palme d’Or at Cannes but lost out at the Academy Awards to Gandhi for best picture.

    He also assisted executive producer Mildred on the Hal Ashby cult classic Harold and Maude (1971), starring Ruth Gordon and Bud Cort.

    Lewis' other notable producing efforts included The List of Adrian Messenger, directed by John Huston and starring Douglas; the 1983 ABC miniseries The Thorn Birds, starring Richard Chamberlain; Crackers (1984), directed by Louis Malle; and his final film, The River (1984), starring Spacek and Mel Gibson.

    Born on Dec. 16, 1919, in Camden, New Jersey, Edward Lewis at age 16 entered Bucknell University, where he competed as a boxer and wrestler and belonged to the Jewish fraternity Sigma Alpha Mu. After a brief stint in dental school, he served as a captain during World War II.

    Moving to Los Angeles after the war, he married Mildred in 1946, and they collaborated on the screenplay adaptation of Honoré de Balzac's The Lovable Cheat (1949), featuring Buster Keaton. (Edward also co-produced the movie.)

    In 1952, he produced 20 installments of the pioneering CBS anthology series Schlitz Playhouse.

    Lewis and Frankenheimer also worked together on The Fixer (1968), The Extraordinary Seaman (1969), The Gypsy Moths (1969), I Walk the Line (1970), The Horsemen (1971) and The Iceman Cometh (1973).

    With Mildred and in consultation with Angela Davis, Lewis wrote the screenplay for Brothers (1977), a fictional account of the George Jackson story that starred Bernie Casey and examined racial injustice in the American prison system.

    He also authored, with Mildred, the books Heads You Lose (2002) and Masquerade (2006), as well as several plays and musicals. One, Ring-a-Ring-a-Rosy, was awarded the Harold Prince Musical Theater Prize in 1995.

    Edward and Mildred were actively involved in civil rights causes, working with Cesar Chavez to facilitate the establishment of the United Farmworkers of America's headquarters in La Paz, California and organizing a Hollywood Bowl fundraiser for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

    Avid travelers and art collectors, they loaned part of their collection to LACMA for exhibition.

    In addition to Lewis' daughters Susan and Joan, survivors include sons-in-law Robert and David and grandchildren Maya and Lewis.​

    Douglas, Lewis, Frankenheimer

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  10. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Jack Whitaker, legendary CBS Sports announcer, has died at 95

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    Jack Whitaker, legendary sportscaster and World War II veteran, died Sunday morning in his sleep in Devon, Pennsylvania, of natural causes. He was 95 years old.
    Whitaker was a CBS Sports announcer for 22 years, starting in the late 1950s. He covered everything from football and horse racing to golf. Whitaker called Super Bowl I for CBS Sports as well as the 1973 Triple Crown Race with Secretariat emerging victorious. After his time at CBS Sports, Whitaker worked at ABC Sports.
    Whitaker was born and raised in the Philadelphia area, where he attended Saint Joseph's University, before serving in World War II from April 1943 to November 1945. Whitaker began his broadcast career at WCAU-TV in Philadelphia.
    In addition to his celebrated broadcast career, Whitaker was a United States Army veteran who landed on Omaha Beach three days after the D-Day Invasion of June 6, 1944. According to a 2014 article by The Desert Sun, Whitaker was wounded by a blast from an artillery shell or mortar, which sent shrapnel tearing into his arm. After his recovery, Whitaker was wounded once more and was honorably discharged from the Army in 1945.
    "Some angels were looking over me," Whitaker told The Desert Sun in 2014.
    CBS Sports broadcaster Jim Nantz released a statement on Sunday praising the broadcast legend.
    "When I first met Jack Whitaker in 1986 at Pebble Beach, I felt like I had just been introduced to Ernest Hemingway," Nantz said. "I grew up watching him deliver contemplative and contextual prose with his famous short essays, bringing class and dignity to his industry. He was enormously proud to have called Super Bowl I for CBS and was the last surviving network commentator from that landmark game. I spoke to him this week after hospice came to his home and his mind was still brilliantly sharp right to the end."
    CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus issued a statement expressing his condolences to Whitaker's family, saying, "There will never be another Jack Whitaker in sports broadcasting."
    "His amazing writing ability, on-air presence and humanity are unmatched. His unique perspective on sports ranging from horse racing to golf to NFL football was extraordinary," McManus said. "My father and Jack shared an incredible respect for each other and had the warmest of friendships that lasted for decades. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Jack's family."
    Whitaker was inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame in 2012. Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.
    Whitaker is survived by his wife, Patricia, daughters Marybeth Helgevold (Chuck), Ann Hanan (Bob); sons Gerry Whitaker, Jack Whitaker III and Kevin Whitaker (Rachelle). He was predeceased by his son, Geoffrey Whitaker. He had 11 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren.
     
  11. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant

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    Now THAT was a class act. I would always sigh inwardly when I heard him broadcasting a game. An old friend to my ears
     

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