First "Modern" Sounding Rock Album

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Corn Pop, May 7, 2023.

  1. Corn Pop

    Corn Pop Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    eagle nest, nm
    Howdy,

    Hard to explain what I mean but maybe this will be understood by some and create an interesting topic.

    To me it seems like rock music had a certain sound until.....well that's the topic!

    I'd say Beatles Revolver. Rubber Soul had a bit of the "mop tops" sound but Revolver made a big leap in engineering and creativity. Sgt Pepper clearly rocked in a different way. Compare Sgt Pepper with what I consider a MUCH better album of the era; Love's Forever Changes. Forever Changes still has a bit of that 1960s vibe and straddles the line between 1960s canned sound and a new direction.

    Led Zeppelin 1 was a typical of the day blues album BUT LZ2 (I don't know why so many don't like that album!) clearly "modern" and iconic. Cream may fit the bill but despite incredible songs and playing I can't think of another band where every song sounds the same! Amazing but relied upon virtuosity and not studio genius.

    So what I'm driving at is there seemed to be a sound that permeated 1960's music and sounds as dated as 1950's doo wop. Obviously driven by labels and it was a while before bands started to make their own decisions. Play their own instruments on their own songs and that seemed to break it wide open.

    I have other ideas but don't want to pontificate further and am interested in others opinions!

    Thanks!
     
  2. UnderTheFloorboards'66

    UnderTheFloorboards'66 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
  3. rjp

    rjp Senior Member

    Location:
    Ohio
    led zeppelin I - nothing before it sounded anything like it.
     
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  4. pig bodine

    pig bodine God’s Consolation Prize

    Location:
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Production style? Blood Sweat and Tears and the already mentioned LZII and I’d throw Abbey Road in there- they sounded like 70’s albums.
     
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  5. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    „Autobahn“ by Kraftwerk
    „Red“ by King Crimson
    „Taking Tiger Mountain“ by strategy Eno
    „For Your Pleasure“ by Roxy Music
     
  6. Zack

    Zack Senior Member

    Location:
    Easton, MD
    Nah, I think the Beatles Great Leap was Help to Rubber Soul, so I call that one a good candidate. What Brian Wilson was doing about the same time was covering similar ground. So, maybe side 2 of BB Today or Pet Sounds. Jumping Jack Flash hit different and modern with the drone.

    I also think the leap from 4-track to 8-track (eg Doors Strange Days) made a big difference.
     
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  7. Svetonio

    Svetonio Forum Resident

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    Serbia
  8. Doggiedogma

    Doggiedogma "Think this is enough?" "Uhh - nah. Go for broke."

    Axis: Bold As Love has always sounded modern and futuristic.
     
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  9. wondergrape

    wondergrape Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ohio
    Was just going to post. This is the answer.
     
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  10. Classicrock

    Classicrock Senior Member

    Location:
    South West, UK.
    For me 'modern' sound on LP started from the early 80s or even late 70s. Production style changed as well as something in the way records were cut. The word digital comes to mind but even analogue recordings were trying to sound digital. Also multitrack systems had become very complex in terms of more and more tracks which could stifle recordings.
     
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  11. Bassist

    Bassist Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    Jeff Beck's Truth set the ball rolling for Led Zep, Humble Pie and countless others who took the Yardbirds thing and gave it that vocally overwrought, virtuoso-led, stadium-ready grandiosity.

    If by Modern we mean a Rock music detached from the 60s club scene (so not rooted in Blues, Folk, R&B or early Rock n Roll) and at the same time giving primacy to new technologies then the King Crimson debut has to have a decent claim. Thiugh perhaps still too much of a Moody Blues folkiness in the mix to be considered truly modern.

    So for me Bowie's Low might be the first properly Modern record that tosses the old ways aside, is technologically advanced using the studio as an instrument, giving traditional instruments new angles, working with unusual song structures but yet still audibly a Rock album.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2023
  12. TheHutt

    TheHutt Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    Deep Purple - In Rock.
    A giant leap from the very 60s sound of Deep Purple S/T.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. MLutthans

    MLutthans That's my spaghetti, Chewbacca! Staff

    In broad terms, I think the jump from 3- or 4- to 8-track for non-classical projects was a big jump in terms of reducing quirky panning of a small number of mono elements, and Dolby A allowed a lot of tracks to be utilized while minimizing background hiss, expanding signal-to-noise ratios, etc.
    IMG_20230507_112341.jpg
    How different (for better or worse) would, say, Honky Chateau have sounded if it had been recorded on 4-track tape? A lot!
     
  14. Mal

    Mal Phorum Physicist

    YARDBIRDS



     
  15. bcaulf

    bcaulf Forum Resident

    Good answer. Sounds very beyond its time.
     
  16. Another Steve

    Another Steve Senior Member

    I'd go with [​IMG]

    the earliest Beatles album I kept.
     
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  17. Bluepicasso

    Bluepicasso Android Confused

    Location:
    Arlington, Va
    I've have thought a lot about this, and I always come back to this album. Has rock really progressed since this? Think about it.
     
  18. jeddy

    jeddy Forum Resident

    I'd have to agree with Autobahn by Kraftwerk.

    But I would vote for Here Come The Warm Jets by Eno. That album was just so futuristic. It redefined pop music.

    I'd also have to vote Search and Destroy
    by The Stooges.. just sooo singular and distinctive for it's time.
     
  19. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host

    Location:
    California
    R
    E
    V
    O
    L
    V
    E
    R
     
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  20. StarsCanFrighten

    StarsCanFrighten Forum Resident

    Location:
    Miami
    The obvious answer is Revolver.

    Also… I can’t speak for the entire album, but whenever I hear Spiral Staircase’s More Today Than Yesterday I’m amazed at how 20- 30 years ahead of it’s time that drum kit sounded. Just sayin’.
     
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  21. BSC

    BSC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow, Scotland
    You've went off at an angle there.
     
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  22. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Senior Member

    Location:
    England
    Bob Dylan - Highway 61 Revisited. For the lyrics, unconventional songs and song lengths as well as the rockin' band. Like A Rolling Stone was ahead of everything.
     
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  23. Anaan Ng

    Anaan Ng Interested Party

    I was going to go with "You Really Got Me" by the Kinks, because that takes us sort of out of the jump blues vernacular and puts us straight into hard rock. I'm not a musicologist, but I can hear things going on there that stand out from other rock n' roll releases that are indebted to R&B.

    Then we can move on to things like the Beatles '65/'66 output.
     
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  24. tim185

    tim185 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    love the Beatles, but its not really "modern day rock " guys.
     
  25. Kassonica

    Kassonica Forum Resident

    Um.... Black sabbath... the modern rock sound was born right there
     
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