Dismiss Notice
We are making some updates and reconfigurations to our server. Apologies for any downtime or slow forum loading now or within the next week or so. Thanks!

"Hemingway": PBS Bio Film 4/5/21

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by The Panda, Mar 24, 2021.

  1. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant Thread Starter

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    Tanx, GMfan87', Strummergas and 3 others like this.
  2. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant Thread Starter

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    just a refresh for a Thursday AM
     
  3. misterjones

    misterjones Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    Ken Burns? Forget it.
     
    jojopuppyfish likes this.
  4. Quakerism

    Quakerism Monk

    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    I can find a little good in almost anything if I try. I watched and I learned something about Hemingway I didn’t know. Through this I may have earned more insight into one of my favorite authors who idolized Hemingway. In any event, it was good.
     
    YardByrd and skisdlimit like this.
  5. The Panda

    The Panda Forum Mutant Thread Starter

    Location:
    Marple, PA, USA
    Yea, knew some of it, but some gaps got filled in. I knew he had this 'thing' about suicide. And of course, it follows down the line to further generations. Sad
     
  6. Armjim

    Armjim Music is indeed a gift from Heaven

    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    I had a hard time trying to read A Moveable Feast a few years ago. Then I read Islands In the Stream last year and got lost in it. Coincidentally I just received my WETA magazine with him on the cover and an article about the series. I am looking forward to watching it and learning more about Hemingway beyond a Wikipedia article. I like Ken Burns so believe it will be worth exploring.
     
    Davido and riverclown like this.
  7. Quakerism

    Quakerism Monk

    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    I grew up under instruction that placed a great stigma on individuals who took their own lives. That they would have an ultimate judgement past on them for eternity, that the act itself was evidence of great weakness, that it was the culmination of a wasted life. Of course, it has always been a well practiced art, to lower others in order to raise yourself.

    But as experience overtakes dogma, one realizes lives are not created equal. That some carry heavy burdens for short times and some long times. And for a few the pain of living becomes a pathway to the relief of dying. I have known many of these events in all their methods possible and at first you feel sorrow for them, but in time their passing affects you no more than the cracking of an egg in the frying pan.

    Hemingway was uniquely Hemingway as we are uniquely ourselves.
     
  8. GMfan87'

    GMfan87' Forum Resident

    Location:
    CT.
    Wow, powerful post, agree with most but the "cracking of an egg" metaphor . I have long found him fascinating and read two bios , some of his novels and saw film adaptations.
    I watched last night and it didn't inform me on anything I hadn't known yet but it's well done , as is typical Burns.
    It reminded me though to get back to reading more of his novels.
     
  9. Adam9

    Adam9 Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I watched the first episode last night and was fascinated, not knowing that much about Hemingway and not familiar with his work. I certainly will have to read him. Intelligent television for a change.
    As for Ken Burns, I've watched the Civil War, Baseball, National Parks and a lot of the Vietnam series. All have been well worth seeing IMO.
     
  10. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    I think episode one was the best thing available last night. There could be a little more of an attempt to place him amid more contemporary authors than they did, not quite the huge original as presented I don't feel. No mention of D.H. Lawrence or Dorothy Parker that I can recall, and Mark Twain should figure a fair bit I might think. I'm all about context: Beatles as total game changers type narratives without mentioning Little Richard, Gene Vincent, or girl groups for example but saying how unlike Bobby Vinton they were would be as bad. Talking heads of obvious total fans gushing in any kind of documentary unchallenged is a weakness, although some were also helpful in explaining why some of these stylistic traits touched them so... plus Bach! Those Bach references were very illuminating! :cool:
     
  11. Adam9

    Adam9 Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    Totally agreed. I found the use of the Cello Suites in the soundtrack very apt given Hemingway's admiration for Bach and his playing cello as a youth,
     
    beccabear67 likes this.
  12. townsend

    townsend Senior Member

    Location:
    Ridgway, CO
    I just finished the first episode. I was mesmerized. What a writer, and (so far), what a life to inform his writing. The voice of Peter Coyote added immeasurably to the experience.
     
    arley and YardByrd like this.
  13. Davido

    Davido Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    Now I feel I need to read "A Farewell to Arms" - I've never delved into some of Hemingway's more celebrated novels. That's the mark of a well done series, making you want to dive in for more.
     
    Dignan2000 and YardByrd like this.
  14. dougotte

    dougotte Petty, Annoying Dilettante

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Our daughter lives in Key West, FL. I recommend visiting it, not only because it's such a beautiful place, but also because Hemingway lived there for years. You can tour the house he and his (second?) wife owned there.

    The Hemingway Home & Museum

    Sloppy Joe's and a few other places are bars that he liked to frequent, but they're not even in the same locations anymore.
     
    Crungy, eeglug and Adam9 like this.
  15. Jack Lord

    Jack Lord Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I second that.

    My parents dragged my kid sister and I there around 1979 or so. Ended up loving it. A very cool house and legions of six-toed cats. A bunch of old timers gave the tours and I recall my mother saying they were his friends. I will have to verify that.

    I also saw his house down in Cuba as well as a couple of the gin joints he swam in. The El Floridita has his stool sectioned off with velvet ropes. The Pilar is in a pavilion behind the National Museum. It has an honor guard armed with an AK-47. Fella could not take his eyes off my Nikes. The "Old Man" was still alive at the time and happily received visitors but I could not make the trek.
     
    Crungy and YardByrd like this.
  16. Holerbot6000

    Holerbot6000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    Well isn't there like the 'Official' Sloppy Joe's and the place that claims to be the ORIGINAL Sloppy Joe's? We drank heavily in one of them, then went to the other one and drank heavily there too. We didn't want to miss anything. We toured the cigar factory after that but I frankly don't remember much about it. :nyah:

    Looking forward to watching this doc series. Big Hemingway fan.
     
    Dignan2000 and Jack Lord like this.
  17. YardByrd

    YardByrd rock n roll citizen in a hip hop world

    Location:
    Europe
    A Farewell to Arms is my favorite novel by Ernie... that and The Sun Also Rises are as good as it gets as far as he's concerned in the novel format - I've read everything he's written and his later novels don't match these two... but it's the short story where he really thrived... too many great short stories to name... especially the Nick Adams stories...
     
    johnsiddique, arley and Davido like this.
  18. Holerbot6000

    Holerbot6000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    I think A Moveable Feast might be my favorite. It's the one I seem to go back to the most. An embarrassment of riches though, to be sure.
     
    johnsiddique, Tanx and YardByrd like this.
  19. GMfan87'

    GMfan87' Forum Resident

    Location:
    CT.
    A Farewell To Arms is a very good one and For Whom the Bell Tolls.
    I didn't find episode 2 to be as good as 1. I know how important hunting and bullfighting were to him but too much time spent on it and the gory photos.
    No mention of the films made of his books , that would of been interesting to hear how they rated and how he felt about them. Looking forward to the conclusion ..
     
    HoundsOBurkittsville likes this.
  20. Adam9

    Adam9 Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    I've visited some places in Havana that Hemingway frequented. Pretty cool.
     
  21. Duke Fame

    Duke Fame Sold out the Enormodome

    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    DVR'ing the series and just finished episode One. I thought it was pretty good. I'm not much of a fiction reader really but I've always been interested in Hemingway as the larger than life character and it's nice to learn more about him. I might have to pick up some of his books and give them a go. I'll probably start with his short stories.
     
    GMfan87' likes this.
  22. Davido

    Davido Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    Good point. Everybody bad mouthed "To Have and Have Not" (I'd forgotten he wrote it) but the movie was pretty damn good as I recall. I do not think the adaptions of books like "Sun Also Rises" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls" were as widely praised, but I can't remember seeing either one of those. I did a book report on the Sun Also Rises in junior high school and that was too young to tackle that assignment!
     
  23. Davido

    Davido Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    Guess I should go to the Floridita bar in Havana when I go? Any other recommends?
     
  24. YardByrd

    YardByrd rock n roll citizen in a hip hop world

    Location:
    Europe
    To Have and Have Not is indeed a great movie, but bears little resemblance to the book, which is not one of Hem's better pieces... funnily enough, Hem's rival for Great American Novelist, William Faulkner, worked on the script for the flick...
     
    Davido likes this.
  25. Adam9

    Adam9 Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto
    Sorry, can't help you. I was on a city tour and just remember that hotel was part of it. I don't think we went to another places associated with Hemingway. Anyway, Havana is a great place to visit in any event.
     
    GMfan87' and Davido like this.

Share This Page

molar-endocrine