How to fix a small crack in wood veneer of speaker cabinet

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by zonka, Mar 16, 2023 at 7:12 PM.

  1. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    I have a small hairline crack in the side of the wood veneer of my speaker cabinet. The veneer is cherry wood. Any suggestions as to how to keep the crack from growing? Is there a special clear glue I could apply with a toothpick, or something? I'm wondering how to keep the glue flat - I won't be able to sand, obviously.
    I really have no idea and was hoping someone here might have some experience or advice?
    Thanks a bunch:)
     
  2. Glmoneydawg

    Glmoneydawg Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario Canada
    If you could post a picture it would be helpful...there are some clever woodworking members here.
     
  3. John3655

    John3655 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Southampton
    Wood glues based on PVA start white and set clear, so just smear some into the joint. Hold the joint closed with tape if necessary. Clean before it sets with damp tissue.
     
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  4. okc_craft

    okc_craft I BUILT THAT

    Location:
    Okc
    Let’s see a picture. If it’s veneer it probably isn’t feasible to “reglue” the split. If it’s aesthetic then there is a few options involving some colored wax. I personally though wouldn’t just put pva wood glue in there and expect it to dry clear and look good. It won’t.
     
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  5. Glmoneydawg

    Glmoneydawg Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario Canada
    @zonka this would be one of the clever woodworking members here...post a pic and take his advice.
     
  6. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    Can I email you pic? Not sure how to post one here.
    Thanks:)
     
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  7. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict Forever moving forward

    Location:
    AZ
    I wouldn't even fathom a guess on this until I saw a pic or inspected... heck, the "veneer" might not even be wood, and the substrate most likely isn't (composite most of the time). Recommending glue up techniques without knowing a little more about the "veneer", how thick it is, etc is not possible, many times these veneers are so thin there isn't enough surface to make a joint. (and when you might want to explore the color / wax option okc mentioned).

    This is not always as easy as it sounds, but then again he might have a 100% hardwood cabinet that has a stress crack or check, and maybe could be pulled back together with some glue / syringe and a couple of clamps. I'm doubting however.

    Pics, and even knowledge of material of veneer and substrate, would help. Thickness of veneer too, but I'll wait to see the damage.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2023 at 8:09 PM
  8. aunitedlemon

    aunitedlemon Desiccated by division.

    Location:
    Oregon
    Colored pencils are your friend. You might not be able to stop the split but you can color it to match so it's a lot less noticeable.
     
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  9. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict Forever moving forward

    Location:
    AZ
    Chances are good it could end up there, waiting for pics, don't know his speaker.... and he did say "crack" and not "scratch"...
     
  10. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    These are Silverline Minuet Grands. I have a feeling the veneer is pretty thin. I've never posted pics here. If someone could give me a brief "how to" I'd like to leave a pic in case it can help others down the road.
    Thanks
     
    Glmoneydawg likes this.
  11. Marcev

    Marcev Sit back, Relax, and Enjoy the Music

    Location:
    New York
    You can't directly post pictures in the forums. You have to have them someplace else and link to them from here.
     
  12. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
  13. Glmoneydawg

    Glmoneydawg Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario Canada
    Postimage works great...take pic...copy/ paste here using little postcard image in the response/message thingy we use to post responses
     
  14. Glmoneydawg

    Glmoneydawg Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario Canada
  15. mjcmt

    mjcmt Forum Resident

    Location:
    NC, USA
    These work for cracks, but looks like your veneer is lifting from dry environment or UV from the sun. May need to apply heat and iron flat, or cut out the raised section and re-veneer the sliver cut out or use a filler. Not always an easy solution for lifted veneer.

    SEISSO Wood Filler Sticks, Furniture Wax Crayons for Scratches

    Amazon.com
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2023 at 8:34 PM
  16. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict Forever moving forward

    Location:
    AZ
    Not a crack, but a veneer "bubble" or popping at the joint - moisture could've gotten in there, popping the adhesion of the apparently thin veneer. Or maybe just not enough adhesive at the factory at that spot on the veneer. Or adhesive failure.

    If you press down on the raised portion, does it temporarily stick, then pop back up? Can you push it down flush with your fingers, or is the veneer to thick to push down the raised portion?

    Also, do you think that's hardwood, or a vinyl composite?

    This isn't a color pencil repair, unfortunately google fans.
     
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  17. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict Forever moving forward

    Location:
    AZ
    BTW, I can see it in a few spots, there are also some areas where it's popping up but smaller now. You may have something starting there, a trend... :)
     
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  18. Ingenieur

    Ingenieur A dog looking for a home

    Location:
    Back in PA
    can he set it on its side
    Careful apply heat
    Put some weight on like a bunch of books
    ???
     
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  19. Rich-n-Roll

    Rich-n-Roll Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington State
  20. timind

    timind phorum rezident

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  21. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    Definitely no moisture. I'm guessing dried out. I oiled up the speakers today and will stay on tip of it in order to try to halt the advance.
    Assuming it is from heat, is there a consensus? Lots of opinions and options.
    I think someone mentioned some wax - might that seal it?
    Thanks for all the replies.
     
  22. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    Thank you:)
     
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  23. aunitedlemon

    aunitedlemon Desiccated by division.

    Location:
    Oregon
    Screw it. Start shopping for new speakers! :D
     
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  24. zonka

    zonka Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Peoria, AZ USA
    They were way too expensive to give up on them for that! Plus, they sound great!
     
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  25. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict Forever moving forward

    Location:
    AZ
    How is wax going to push the raised / popped joint back down and re-adhere it? Plus wax is the universal "anti adherent" and once that gets in there, it'll be tough for any adhesive to ever stick there again.

    Or heat up a joint that has suspected dried up or failed adhesive, and then what? Are we expecting the perhaps failed adhesive to magically reactivate :) and hold it this time? Plus, you're going to need a little pressure to that spot, focused pressure, which can be tricky in big pieces, as you probably don't have a clamp with enough reach sitting around.

    Why even take a chance like that, besides if it's a thin composite too much heat might soften the veneer or the adhesive around the affected area (probably contact cement) around it and you have a bigger problem as that lets go.

    That's right, there's never a shortage there.

    But on things like this, be careful, knowledge is key and you could actually make it worse with some things mentioned. Putting wax in that crack will guarantee one thing - it's gonna be hard to make any adhesive stick there ever again. And you may already be there if that oil you mentioned you're wiping them down with has seeped into that raised / popped area.

    Always options, but if you think the adhesive dried out, then the only attempt at a fix entails some way to get the right adhesive back under there, and apply enough focused pressure to that spot to hold and seal it. Applying heat and putting pressure to a spot with failed or dried up adhesive might not work work, nothing to stick to.

    If you answered the questions provided earlier, it would help a lot. If it's wood, yellow glue might work, if its composite maybe some contact cement (which is probably what was used at the factory). If it's thin composite, it'll press down easier with pressure. If it's thick veneer wood it won't, it can take a lot of pressure. But that's the reason for the questions. A thick wood veneer joint, poorly sealed, can pop and curl with some moisture, and no way you're going to get that baby to set down, especially with the focused pressure problems you already have in this scenario and this type of fix.

    Of course, in any scenario, you'd have to ensure the adhesive gets under the bubble in the first place, with yellow glue you can force it in with your fingers, clean up with a damp towel on the surface... if contact cement required, tips and tricks might be needed.

    Honestly, with what I'm telling you already is probably making you doubt your reserve to do it :) possible but not everyone wants to try something that'll work. Depends on your tolerance. These things are not always simple and the colored pencil won't work. Plus, if you've introduced any wax or oils in that joint, the ship might have already sailed.

    Scared off yet? This could be simple, or it might be difficult. I can't tell from the pics though and why I asked the questions before.

    BTW, if you need a bio, I grew up a house painter / furniture refinisher as my father ran a painting / decorating biz for 50 years. I painted my first wall at 9 yrs old, grew up with brushes in my hand, painted my way and furniture repaired through college, it paid the bills. Then took up woodworking for 30 years, and have repaired a few pieces of furniture along the way, and built just as many. I know it's tough to know what advice is on target at times...
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2023 at 9:23 PM
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