It's October- Horror Movie Month..Whatcha Watchin?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Luvtemps, Sep 30, 2021.

  1. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    Is this one related? Neither film has a great imdb rating (not that matters much for horror :)).

    [​IMG]
    The Puppet Masters (1994, Stuart Orme)
    The Earth is invaded by stingray-shaped alien "slugs" that ride on people's backs and control their minds.
    Donald Sutherland & Keith David are in it. All I need. :p
     
  2. Michael

    Michael I LOVE WIDE S-T-E-R-E-O!

    no they are not. : )
     
    NickySee likes this.
  3. Ghostworld

    Ghostworld Senior Member

    Location:
    US
    that was great show
     
  4. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    [​IMG]
    The Thing (1982, John Carpenter)
    Another classic. Watching "the making of" special (above) before I rewatch the feature. One day I'll get around to reading the original John Campbell novella.
     
    Tim Lookingbill and Ghostworld like this.
  5. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    [​IMG]
    Dawn of the Dead (1978, George A. Romero)
    Following an ever-growing epidemic of zombies that have risen from the dead, two Philadelphia S.W.A.T. team members, a traffic reporter, and his television executive girlfriend seek refuge in a secluded shopping mall.

    Haven't watched this one in its entirety since I saw it in the cinema (back in '78!). Never found a good copy online til now. Romero's film is working on several levels that I couldn't haven't appreciated as a kid. It's not the usual toss-off zombie flick.
     
    Thwacko, SmallDarkCloud and unclefred like this.
  6. SmallDarkCloud

    SmallDarkCloud Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    I have mixed opinions on the previous VHS films, but I really liked this one. My one major complaint is that the plot of the last segment is hard to follow. I had to read a synopsis on Reddit to figure out what was happening (the other segments don't have this problem). Timo Tjahjanto directed one segment; he directed one of the most disturbing segments in the series (in the second film), and this one is just as horrifying.
     
  7. SmallDarkCloud

    SmallDarkCloud Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    Some of my favorite moments in Dawn of the Dead are the low-key character-building scenes, like the three leads having fun roaming the mall, finding temporary sanctuary from what's happening outside. And there's the great moment when Gaylen Ross faces a zombie standing behind a glass door. It can't get to her, but she looks and recognizes that the zombie was human once, not a monster. That's the Romero touch, that I don't get from most zombie movies or The Walking Dead.
     
    Thwacko and NickySee like this.
  8. Curveboy

    Curveboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    Re-watched Halloween (2018) in anticipation of Halloween Kills (gladly on Peacock!)

    It is way better than it has any right to be. I don't think I got to enjoy it fully when I saw it in the theater as some creepy guy dressed up as Michael and was walking around the theater for the first 10-15 minutes.
     
    NickySee likes this.
  9. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    [​IMG]
    The Wicker Man (1973, Robin Hardy)
    A puritan Police Sergeant arrives in a Scottish island village in search of a missing girl whom the locals claim never existed.
    The internet archive has a good copy streaming. I've only seen it once, years ago as a teen and found it was quite startling, so I'm looking forward to a revisit. The "making of" featurette above is a nice intro.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2021 at 12:34 PM
    Karnak and Jimi Bat like this.
  10. NickySee

    NickySee Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    :laugh: Not surprised the creepy fan made more of an impression than the 2018 remake. Nothing tops the '78 original, imo.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2021 at 12:46 PM
  11. Curveboy

    Curveboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    It's not a remake, it's a direct sequel to the 1978 original and it's very, very good.
     
    NickySee likes this.
  12. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  13. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    Correct.

    The 2018 version is supposed to be the direct followup to Carpenter's original masterpiece, ignoring all the sequels that came after the 1978 film -- while I liked the 2018 "sequel" (we even bought the Blu-ray), I don't like the fact that, by its very existence, it negates the validity of everything that happened in Rick Rosenthal's Halloween II and the subsequent "decent" entries after that like The Return of Michael Myers. With the 2018 entry, we have to assume Michael never stalked Laurie through the hospital, wasn't set on fire by Loomis and was eventually caught and put in the maximum security ward (which reeked of Zombie's take on the story, frankly; it also messes up the continuity regarding Michael's disappearance from the lawn after Loomis shoots him, though I suppose you can just assume they eventually caught him).

    I'm looking forward to the next two installments, but it's hard to look past the whole "you have to ignore ALL the other sequels" suspension of disbelief thing...
     
  14. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  15. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  16. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  17. JWew

    JWew Currently thinking of a clever Custom Title...

    Location:
    KC, MO USA
    The Night of the Devils (1972)
    Italian horror flick, I've watched it a handful of times now since buying it on blu-ray (Raro Video) last year.
    Just a great creepy film, will loads of atmosphere. Oh, and actress Agostina Belli is :righton:.
     
    unclefred and Jimi Bat like this.
  18. Barnabas Collins

    Barnabas Collins Senior Member

    Location:
    NH
    I watched it yesterday too. Are you referring to the military militia segment? I was thoroughly confused on that one and thought maybe I fell asleep or something. I couldn't figure it out for the life of me. I liked the funeral home segment quite a bit.
     
  19. Curveboy

    Curveboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    Since the continuity was always pretty loose I'm just looking at it like a DC or Marvel multi-verse...all the movies can exist on their own time lines.

    I do agree the thought of negating all the other movies (the less said about the Rob Zombie-verse the better) wasn't my ideal but I think they pulled it off.
     
    Kaskade10729 likes this.
  20. SmallDarkCloud

    SmallDarkCloud Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    That's the one. I couldn't make much sense of it. The synopsis on Reddit did clear up some of my confusion... but overall, it's still incoherent.

    I really liked the funeral home segment, as well. The television news segment and the cyborg segment are also very good. It was only that fourth one that didn't work for me. I had similar problems with some of the segments in the earlier films.
     
  21. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    Guess I'm just having a harder time with it, being that I've always loved Rosenthal's sequel as a direct continuation of the story.

    I'm torn on this one; in some senses, they pulled it off (Michael much older now and relegated to being locked in this maximum security nuthouse after supposedly being caught, Laurie becoming an eccentric hermit waiting for the day her brother returns, et. al.) but on the other hand I feel like this should have instead ignored the utter crap that came after part five (Resurrection, H20, etc.), especially since we had to suffer through complete ******** like Busta Rhymes kung-fu-kicking Myers while bellowing "HAPPY HALLOWEEN, MOTHA ****A!!!!!!!" (which is when I knew the series had completely come off the proverbial rails), and kind of picked up from there (making the assumption Loomis passed away from natural causes while providing nods to the fire he and Michael were in, perhaps making a reference to Laurie's niece Jamie, that kind of thing, as to reflect on and acknowledge better sequels like four and five).
     
    Curveboy likes this.
  22. Rough&Rowdy

    Rough&Rowdy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Blackpool, UK
    Halloween Kills has a new 1978 flashback scene so I bet they show Michael getting caught.

    Looking forward to it!
     
    Kaskade10729 likes this.
  23. reddyempower

    reddyempower Forum Resident

    Location:
    columbus, oh, usa
    One of my problems as well. What's the point in anything happening in a movie or series if we can just say... well it didn't happen after all.

    Watched the original II a few years ago, and the whole sister thing was added just to give Michael a reason to go after Laurie. It was a pretty silly movie, and seemed more like Friday the 13th than Halloween.

    I also didn't much care for the 2018. Just got caught up in the hype and watched it.

    Not gonna see the new one. The original is a classic with great acting and an awesome score and this is IMO one of those flicks where I just wanna stick with the original. Great ending too!
     
  24. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    Now THAT'S cool...didn't hear anything about that, so now I'm looking forward to it as well.
     
    Rough&Rowdy likes this.
  25. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    I agree with you about the original being a classic, of course, and there is absolutely no equal or, for that matter, follow-up that can touch it even remotely. There's a reason Carpenter's masterpiece is STILL studied in film classes to this day as an example of how to create a frightening narrative devoid of any blood or gore, relying instead 100-perecent on MOOD to get a point across.

    But I do appreciate Rosenthal's sequel as a direct continuation of Carpenter's tale -- in fact, much like I have said about The Thing prequel from 2011, which ends PRECISELY where Carpenter's 1982 film picks up, this is the way to do a continuing narrative. Of course, all is not perfect; far from it: If you look closely, you'll see massive continuity errors between the ending of Halloween and the beginning of Halloween II, starting with the fact that Laurie's (Jamie Lee Curtis) hair is totally different when she gets wheeled into the ambulance in the beginning of the sequel (those wigs they put her in were AWFUL)...and yet this is supposed to be the same night, minutes after Loomis shoots The Shape and he escapes. There's also the issue of why Michael needed to go and kill people around the neighborhood after surviving being shot -- I mean, what was the point of killing Mrs. Elrod and the other girl (the latter of which was actually added by Carpenter) if he's after Laurie?

    Indeed, it all does feel like Rosenthal and Akkad just wanted to up the body counts and make this a straight-on slasher devoid of the sheer tension and mood generated by the first film -- much like, as you pointed out, a Friday the 13th sequel or something.

    Still, I always loved Halloween II as a kid, and always will appreciate it as a good sequel. Will it EVER be Carpenter's classic? No way. But I do like the fashion in which they attempted to mimic some of the feel of the first one, including Michael's legendary walking and emotionless gestures, and will always love the updated synthesized realization of Carpenter's iconic score.

    As for the 2018 version, it is by no means a GREAT film, but it is definitely the best sequel/continuation we've gotten since The Revenge of Michael Myers (and that's pushing it; as far as I am concerned, this series officially ended with part four, taking the whole "now Michael's niece is possessed by the spirit of the killer!" angle out of the equation). I would have liked to have seen more of Laurie setting up traps for her brother at the end, knowing he was definitely going to escape again at some point, as I felt that aspect of the story could have been better fleshed out, and they could have left out the whole thing between Judy Greer's character (playing Laurie's daughter) and Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie (the parent/child abrasiveness).

    I do like, however, the way they made Michael appropriately older and balding when we first see him in that psych unit yard -- it was grounded and believable, being that so many years had passed. I didn't like the way the approach they took to Michael kind of smacked of Rob Zombie's rendition of the character -- that is, a massively brooding, impossibly large force that seems to dwarf everyone around him. Sure, Mike was on the taller side in the first film, but for God's sake, when did he ever grow to be the monstrous jolly green giant as depicted in Zombie's film (and, subsequently, as he's kind of portrayed in the 2018 version)? I just didn't buy that.
     

Share This Page

molar-endocrine