Language question: Why has "vinyls" become a word?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by TMegginson, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    I think I'm going to bring back the word "Victrola".
     
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  2. slop101

    slop101 Guitar Geek

    Location:
    So. Cal.
    After Webster's added another definition to the word "literally" to also mean something "figuratively", all bets were off with the English language, and you can now make up your own damn words to mean whatever the hell you want!
     
  3. thrivingonariff

    thrivingonariff Forum Resident

    Location:
    US
    Except that it does do that, and it's not that unusual.
     
  4. Greg Gee

    Greg Gee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Oklahoma
    It's the same in applied engineering. People who speak the language always refered to megawatts or megabyts when quantifying the term as 2 meg, as an example. And now cable companies and internet providers refer to everything as megs, which drives me nuts. I've been using meg, even in a plural sense, for over 30 years in professional circles, yet, away from the job, I always get corrected by some ignoramous with "it's megs" because he heard it on a commercial once? The pride of the ignorant wants to be protected at all costs. Gimme a break! Step into my world and try that one.
     
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  5. Tartifless

    Tartifless Forum Resident

    Location:
    France
    Vinyl has never been an adjective, always a noun
     
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  6. Greg Gee

    Greg Gee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Yeah, a banger is a sausage. ;o)
     
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  7. Spencer R

    Spencer R Forum Resident

    Location:
    Pontotoc, MS
    The reason “RBIs” is wrong is not that “the final letter is the noun,” it’s that the first word of the acronym or abbreviation is the noun, and “batted in” is an adjectival phrase that follows it. Again, no one would ever say “Mike Trout is on pace for 120 runs batted ins this season.” When we abbreviate the correct plural “runs batted in” to “RBI,” the “R” stands for the plural noun “runs” when we are talking about more than one run batted in. There’s no need to make the abbreviation a double plural.

    We see this principle in effect, ironically enough, on record labels that state “33 1/3 RPM,” not “33 1/3 RPMs.” In this case “RPM” stands for “revolutions per minute,” and there is no need, reason, or excuse to make the abbreviation into a double plural by saying or writing “33 1/3 RPMs.” People would certainly laugh at anyone who said “33 1/3 revolutions per minutes.”
     
  8. jmxw

    jmxw Forum Resident

    I believe it was [and this is totally anecdotal, btw] something that crept into use with an ironic twist of "I call them vinyls even though I know vinyl is plural".

    That's the inflection I first heard when my son [who is now 21] started referring to "vinyls" several years back. Then the ironic tone fell by the wayside and now it is a thing....
     
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  9. Greg Gee

    Greg Gee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Oklahoma
  10. oxegen

    oxegen Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    Not forgetting - this, that, these and those.
     
  11. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    My friends in Italy laughed at how we say "lasagna" as a singular. (It's plural "lasagne" in Italian.)

    They joked that American lasagna is in the singular because it's a singular cheesy glob.
     
  12. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    AAVE is a variety of American English with consistent rules and vocabulary. I didn't say all Black people in the USA speak it.
     
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  13. Greg Gee

    Greg Gee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Oklahoma
    The "maths" include:
    Algebra
    Trigonometry
    Geometry
    Calculus
    Differential Equations
     
  14. You misunderstood the chain of my thoughts.
     
    Grant likes this.
  15. To which I agree wholeheartedly. But still language evolves...
     
  16. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Good for them.
     
  17. Spencer R

    Spencer R Forum Resident

    Location:
    Pontotoc, MS
    It’s an adjective when it’s used in a sentence such as “She wore a vinyl raincoat” or “I bought a vinyl record.” Turning “vinyl records” into “vinyls” makes as little sense as turning “compact discs” into “compacts.” No one would say “I bought five Steve Hoffman compacts” or “The black triangle Abbey Road is my favorite compact.”
     
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  18. johnny 99

    johnny 99 Down On Main Street

    Location:
    Toronto
    When we were kids, my Dad always called records "LP's"
    When he heard me call them "albums", he told me that when he was young an "album" meant a book of 78's (usually they came in "4's")
    An "EP" to my Dad meant a 4 track 45 rpm single that was popular in the 50's.
    He also used to buy 10" 33 rpm records in the 50's that had maybe 4 songs per side.

    "Vinyls" has always bugged me. It's something kids still say a lot.
     
  19. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    "I laundered my linens"
    "The glass is half-full"
    "I put on my leathers"

    It's commonplace in all kinds of English.
     
    Grant likes this.
  20. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    You missed one.

    "who's first language"
     
  21. ^^^ "Millennial" used to be an adjective only, too.
     
  22. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    That's why we ended up calling long-playing records "albums" — because the format replaced "albums" of 78s.
     
  23. johnny 99

    johnny 99 Down On Main Street

    Location:
    Toronto
    We called 'singles' "45's" when we were kids but then that term seemed to go away.
     
  24. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    Like the word "meme," it didn't arise organically; it was coined. Before Howe & Strauss published Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation, the generation was known as "Gen Y."

    This is why I think my son's generation won't end up calling themselves "Gen Z." Too derivative.
     
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  25. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I see a lot of misuse of "were" and "was."

    Sentences like:
    If I was a hipster, I'd buy vinyls.
     

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