Language question: Why has "vinyls" become a word?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by TMegginson, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. Markyp

    Markyp Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louth
    So language evolves over time if it is used incorrectly often enough.
    Soon we will all be saying ‘them ones’ instead of ‘those’.
    I’m completely fed up with that one too.
     
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  2. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    My parents were taught to spell "airport" as "aeroport," and "today" as "to-day."

    If you want to claim any such thing as Proper English, you need to pick a time and place. Because the language has never been monolithic or static.
     
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  3. NettleBed

    NettleBed Forum Resident

    Location:
    new york city
    It's because some people are idiots.
     
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  4. Further

    Further Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada

    Yes, yes, yes. I don't understand why this stuff is so difficult.

    One of the big ones I'm seeing all over is "quiet" spelled as "quite" and also the other way around. "I wish I had some peace and quite" and "That is quiet the hair style you have going on there"

    How about the word "imagine" getting messed with lately? "I image that was quiet the party"

    A huge one is the mix up of "and" and "an". "I wish I had and apple"

    There are so many to choose from. These mistakes are actually showing up in printed articles and official news stories now. It's sad, really.
     
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  5. No, because your example "them ones" is a wrong / whimsical form, which adds nothing to the lexicon. Whereas "vinyls" is a cultural neologism. I know vinyl records have been around since the 1950s, but their resurgence as physical objects (and distinct from the CDs) with the younger generations called for - I suppose - such a grammatical evolution. I believe it's far from the first time too in the history of modern languages.
     
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  6. Raf

    Raf Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Ugh. "Make due." That sets my teeth on edge.

    Another one is "tow the line."

    "Yay or nay" seems to pop up in a new thread title around here about every other day.
     
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  7. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    [QUOTE="well thats just how some folk add 's' to everything, e.g.
    "Hey, did you see all those sheeps back there?"
    "It's Sheep, without the S!"
    "Oh... hey, did you see all those heeps back there?"
    Etc.[/QUOTE]

    Fun fact: The vegetable we know as "peas" started out as "pease" — as in "pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold."

    Over time, people started to think that "pease" was a plural term, so they started using the singular "pea" and dropped the E from "pease."

    Our current common words for Pisum sativum aren't wrong, though. The language just changed.
     
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  8. followmehome

    followmehome Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    I blame it on "International English", and it's usage on the internet plus hipsters. I also think people have incorrectly equated people talking about buying an album "on vinyl" with "on CD".
     
  9. intv7

    intv7 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Boston, MA, USA
    That's not evolution. That's just incorrect.
     
  10. dkmonroe

    dkmonroe A completely self-taught idiot

    Location:
    Atlanta
    Or "without further adieu." :laugh:
     
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  11. moople72

    moople72 Forum Resident

    Location:
    KC
    I don't give a wit if it's said incorrectly as long as it's on the radar.
     
  12. Achn2b

    Achn2b Well-Known Member

    Location:
    N. Conway, NH
    Cause people are stupid.
     
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  13. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    The OED is descriptive. "Vinyls" ain't in there yet, but it will be eventually.

    The variation "aks" for "ask" is an established African-American Vernacular English. Consonant-switching through metathesis is also a normal part of language evolution. I imagine people are starting to spell "aks" as "ax" or "axe," and this is also a completely normal part of language evolution.
     
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  14. CybrKhatru

    CybrKhatru Music is life.

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I HATE THOSE MEESES TO PIECES!

    Ah, thanks man..that brings back a good memory :)
     
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  15. gregorya

    gregorya Forum Resident

    Hear, Their and Every Wear... ;)
     
  16. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
     
  17. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    Ouch! Muphry's law strikes again.
     
  18. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    Yeah, knowledgeable people always conform to the norm.

    Er, wait a minute . . .
     
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  19. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Please label the photos you post

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    This topic has peaked my interest.
     
  20. TMegginson

    TMegginson Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Ottawa
    To bring this back to music, you can see some of the mechanisms of language evolution in action in the phenomenon of mondegreens:

    "Scuse me while I kiss this guy"
    "Slow motion Walter and fire-engine guy"
    "She's so popular"

    Can anyone name the songs/actual lyrics these are from?
     
  21. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    Interesting feels take.
     
  22. Raf

    Raf Senior Member

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    AAAAAGH
     
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  23. dividebytube

    dividebytube Forum Resident

    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    My oldest brother, who is 8 years older than I am, was calling it vinyls. He's 57 years old, grew up with my dad's and his own record collection of classic rock. So it was a real headscratcher to me.

    I guess that's what his (young from second marriage) daughters call it so he's trying to sound "hip".
     
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  24. Tartifless

    Tartifless Forum Resident

    Location:
    France
  25. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Forum Resident

    Location:
    Australia
    I have seen the s added by a fellow who did not have Engish as his first language so fair enough.

    On the other hand I think people newer to the game use the s for plural as it feels most comfortable or logical to them but it is still plain ignorance!
     

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