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Latest/recent UHD/Blu-ray/DVD movies watched?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Ken_McAlinden, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  2. Rachael Bee

    Rachael Bee Miembra muy loca

    I never had those. I have the whole series on Laserdisc. On BD I see most of the same picture problems. The reds don't run like on LD but other problems persist. Most of the shows are shot on sets that aren't consistently well lighted. So, many scenes have a lot of video noise. The outdoor shot scenes always look better. I just started season 3 today. I have a ways to go.
     
    Al Kuenster likes this.
  3. Claus LH

    Claus LH Forum Resident

    "Gran Bollito" (1977, Bolognini) (Twilight Time BR):

    Among late-career actors, watching Shelley Winters in anything pretty much guarantees eccentricity. "Poor Pretty Eddie" was my previous dose of her. Still, even with that, "GB" is a real outlier.
    This combination Italian art-film, horror movie and social satire features Shelley as a somewhat nutty, madly protective mother to her grown son. The story gets darker from there...

    If you ever wanted to see Max von Sydow play a woman, this is your chance. He and two Italian actors play females, without any particular irony implied other than the inherent camp fun of it.
    Shelley gives the lead role her usual all, imbuing it with the kind of vulnerability that always tended to shine through her work. Big-eyed Rita Tushingham adds to the one-of-a-kind casting. Everyone is dubbed in Italian.

    The film is shot in gauzy 70s style with gorgeous, pale-colored production design by Danilo Donati, giving some of the scenes an almost 2-color-Technicolor look.
    The mood and photography of the film make you think of far heavier Italian fare of the period, even as the more ghastly aspects of the story start appearing.

    Twilight Time's BR looks pretty good, with the source having a few minor audio hiccups.

    This one goes on the shelf where I have "La Grande Bouffe" "Santa Sangre" and other unclassifiable wonders.

    C.
     
  4. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV - US
    Seven seasons on LD must be a lot of discs, expensive also. I only have the Star Trek NG films on LD.
     
  5. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  6. Rachael Bee

    Rachael Bee Miembra muy loca

    It cost $1.25 more per pair of episodes to get them on LD instead of VHS if you paid full price. I got most of my original series LD's from Columbia House LD Club, all but one disc, I think. When I collected NG on LD I bought some from Tower Records in Nashville when they were on sale. I got the rest at Ken Cranes for 20% off list price. The last two seasons I preordered from Ken Cranes and got them as they were released. This was towards the end of the LD age. I'd get about 4 more LD's about every six weeks. It was well cheaper than if I'd bought VHS tapes at full retail locally.

    Over the years I watched the NG LD's all the way through, I think, 7 times. I had my fun with them and the PCM audio was very, very good even on the first few seasons that were stereo, not surround. They all sounded very good when they hit my processors. I played a few of the LD's in the past year. That made me decide to get the BD set for $110. Times have changed!
     
    Al Kuenster likes this.
  7. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV - US
    I bought a lot of LDs through Ken Cranes and at Tower, I kind of miss those days but not the prices for those LDs.
     
    jhm likes this.
  8. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  9. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  10. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    Just received three Blu-rays in the mail that we ordered via Best Buy:

    [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]

    Will put them through their paces soon...:righton:
     
  11. Claus LH

    Claus LH Forum Resident

    "Soldier Blue" (1970, Nelson) (Kino BR):

    When I first saw the poster as a kid, I knew somehow that it wasn't a basic Western like I was used to...
    Well, fast forward 45 years, and I finally got to see it.
    The story is true; the massacre and the atrocities by the soldiers happened (and, by implication, more than once.) It's a pity that the film, for all its significance, couldn't be better.

    A wagon train is attacked by Natives; Peter Strauss and Candice Bergen's characters are the survivors who try to get to safety at the fort. As they trudge along, we are treated to him as a naive soldier and her as a White former wife of a Native (would-be shades of 'The Searchers'). She is brash and brassy, he's an insufferable prude, and while the material is trying to make points about "different cultures", the net result veers close to terrible sit-com level at times.
    The pacing is slack, the acting very uneven, and the first 50 mins or so of the film is basically them bickering their way through Indian Country. Donald Pleasence shows up and adds life as a sleazy tradesman, but then it's back to our 'heroes'.

    The film finds its purpose and tone in the massacre at the end. The grotesque sequences are over the top, in the way reality can be; yet even here we have to listen to Strauss's character as the voice of outrage.

    "SB"'s reputation rests on the bold revisionist statement it wants to make about the Real West. It is a fascinating study piece: so many things clash and contradict in its making that both as entertainment (if one can call it that) and as a vehicle of criticism it is severely weakened.
    It's from 1970; Buffy Sainte-Marie is on the soundtrack, yet the Native chief is played by a Mexican. The real "hero" is, ultimately, not the Natives, but the whiny jerk played by Strauss, while Bergen's woman, for moral convenience gets to "find her place" at the end of the film.

    Kino's blu-ray is the uncut release. The master is clean throughout, but sharpened in post.

    C.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2020
    Al Kuenster likes this.
  12. Rachael Bee

    Rachael Bee Miembra muy loca

    I like soldier Blue. I saw it in the cinema. I'm sure it only stayed one week. When it came out it didn't do at all well. It just wasn't the kind of western that folks wanted to see. The public had a romance with gunfighter stuff. Realism, screw that! I got the Kino BD too....
     
    Claus LH likes this.
  13. Claus LH

    Claus LH Forum Resident

    "Krakatoa, East of Java" (1969, Kowalski) (Kino BR)

    Yes, Krakatoa is west of Java, as has been mentioned a thousand times over the years, but that's the least of the problems with this lumbering epic.

    With a story involving one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in human history, you'd think drama would be plentiful, yet, the film manages to be a tedious slog for most of its runtime, even including the eruption itself.
    Directed by Bernard Kowalski, and scripted, seemingly, by multiple writers, the framing story is about a treasure-diving expedition aboard a ship commanded by Maximilian Schell. Inevitably, no one heeds the natural warnings along the way as they approach the island.

    The film has an "Airport"-load of melodramatic characters aboard the ship, none of whom make any difference. Scenes are dragged out beyond belief, as if they carry real meaning. The two actors who register a bit are Brian Keith as a Laudanum-addicted diver and JD Cannon as a prisoner, but any good moments are stolen and short.
    One scene in particular drives home the insanity of the script: Keith's diver has a girlfriend on-board and at one point she breaks into song (with the score playing along) while doing a clumsy strip-tease. You sit there thinking: "Did I forget? Is this a musical?"

    Even the Big Boom at the end gets sidelined a bit. Sure, the waters roil and the fireworks blow, but in no way does it drive home the enormity of the actual event. There is a demarcation between the effects work in this: the ship-and-water scenes are mostly impressive, but the travelling-matte composites are rather poor, not because "it was done then" (as people are so quick to add), but because it wasn't done correctly.

    Shot in 65mm Super Panavision (when it was still marketed as 'Cinerama'), the film looks clean and colorful on Kino's BR, but it could have looked even better if it had been derived from a 65mm master. Then it could also have had 6-track sound...

    C.
     
    Rachael Bee likes this.
  14. HorseyAnn

    HorseyAnn Equine-loving rhyme-artist

    Location:
    Britain
    I've just watched Calamity Jane.
     
  15. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  16. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

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    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

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    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  19. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  20. John B Good

    John B Good Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    NS, Canada
    Just watched Last Year at Marienbad. I know its supposed to be incomprehensible, but the man is trying to talk this woman into leaving with him, and I was expecting the husband to shoot the wannabe seducer but it wasn't that clearcut.

    Fine looking visual and I liked some of the music, anyone know if any of it is on cd anywhere?

    Another plus, gave me a chance to improve my French hearing. :)
     
  21. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  22. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

    Re-Visit:

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  23. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  24. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

  25. Kaskade10729

    Kaskade10729 Forum Resident

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