Listenin' to Classical Music and Conversation

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by bluemooze, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    Listening to CD 7 from "Gilels - Complete EMI Recordings."

    Rachmaninov - Piano Concerto 3 with the Orchestre de la Societe des Concerts du Conservatoire led by Andre Cluytens
    Saint-Saens - Piano Concerto 2 with the Orchestre de la Societe des Concerts du Conservatoire led by Andre Cluytens
    Shostakovich - Preludes & Fugues 5 & 24

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  2. ibanez_ax

    ibanez_ax Forum Resident

    CD 1.

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    1. Symphony in C, G. 515:
    2. Symphony in D Minor, G. 517:
    3. Symphony in A, G. 518: Conductor: Michael Erxleben
      New Berlin Chamber Orchestra
     
  3. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
    This is still my favorite recording. Some newer ones might have a bit more transparency (although this LP still sounds pretty good), but I love this interpretation and performance.

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  4. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
  5. ibanez_ax

    ibanez_ax Forum Resident


    Interesting. I plan to listen to Haitink's 1981 recording with the Concertgebouw today or tomorrow.
    Love the Karajan also.
     
  6. ibanez_ax

    ibanez_ax Forum Resident


    I still have that one from the Magazine days. I haven't listened to it in forever. Do you think it's worth another spin?
     
  7. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
    Yes the joining of these two works, was right, the Sibelius is so romantic.
     
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  8. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
    Henk Neven, got a nice voice this bloke.
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  9. ibanez_ax

    ibanez_ax Forum Resident

    CD 4.

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    William Wordsworth’s Third Symphony was one of a number of good British symphonies premiered by Barbirolli and the Hallé at the Cheltenham Festival in the 1950s. It’s the sort of piece that would have suited JB very well. I particularly enjoyed reminding myself of the first movement which is effectively and attractively scored and founded on good ideas. The slow movement – it’s a three-movement score – is eloquent.

    In such a collection as this it’s inevitable that not everything will appeal in equal measure and I’m afraid my blind spot is Humphrey Searle’s Second Symphony. I’ve tried with this piece before and still I don’t ‘get it’ – though I must say that I found the middle movement, a Lento, more rewarding than previously. Perhaps I should continue to persevere but I’m afraid that so far it’s an unequal struggle overall and yet again I’ve been defeated. I hasten to say, though, that my reaction is entirely a matter of personal taste.

    The set concludes with John Joubert’s First Symphony. This performance was originally issued as a CD “single” to mark the composer’s 80th birthday. It’s a very good piece including a rhythmically vital first movement and an intense Lento, ma non troppo. The last of its four movements has a very substantial slow introduction in which the music is tense and dramatic. It’s not until 4:18 that the mood changes to lively good humour, in which vein the symphony ends. Once again Vernon Handley is on the rostrum; what a servant he was to British music.

    British Symphonies LYRITA SRCD.2355 [JQ] Classical Music Reviews: January 2017 - MusicWeb-International


    he Symphony no.3 by William Wordsworth that begins the set’s final CD is another three-movement work, though unusual in that it is in the central movement, Andante espressivo, that the centre of gravity lies. The scoring of this fine movement is notable for a most telling use of the celesta, which enters to play a tune of almost nursery rhyme simplicity. The effect is disturbing, even sinister, and suggested the influence of Shostakovich, something felt strongly at the opening of the symphony as well. The finale, Allegro deciso, is dominated by a splendid string melody, and resolves the tonal conflicts of the earlier movements.

    Humphrey Searle worked for a time at the BBC, and was an important early influence on the corporation’s promotion of new music. (Later he apparently contributed music for a ‘Dr.Who’ serial – sadly lost. True distinction!). His Second Symphony dates from the mid-50s, when he had become heavily involved in film music, writing scores for such movies as ‘Action of the Tiger’ and the brilliant comedy ‘Law and Disorder’. But it was a time of personal tragedy too, with his wife’s death from cancer at the end of 1957 while Searle was in the midst of the composition of this symphony.

    Searle’s music is an unusual amalgam of Romanticism and modernism; he was a life-long admirer of the music not only of Franz Liszt, but also of the Second Vienna School, and indeed studied with Anton Webern before World War 2. Both those strands of his work are well demonstrated in the Second Symphony, which is based on a tone-row presented in the brief but imposing slow introduction. A powerfully rhythmic allegro follows, then a slow movement which is both lyrical and dramatic, with long, elegant lines for the strings often accompanied by terse fanfares. The third movement begins with a return to the rhythmic propulsion of the first allegro, but concludes with a lento solenne of almost brutal finality. Throughout, Josef Krips draws playing of total commitment from the LPO, fully conveying the burning intensity of this work.

    What an appropriate gesture to complete this final disc with a symphony by John Joubert, his first, who is the only composer in this collection still to be alive – and still composing, having had his St Mark Passion premièred earlier this year. This is a four-movement work, with a superficially conventional profile. The opening Allegro energico is a compelling affair, skilfully blending dancing woodwind, expressive string melodies and emphatic descending scales, dominated by brass. The slow movement, beginning with a cry of despair, opens out into a deeply-felt elegy, while the Presto that follows offers contrast without losing the tensions that have pervaded the first two movements. Those tensions persist into the slow introduction of the finale; but they are dissipated in the brilliant and entertaining final allegro vivace, which develops an almost Beethovenian energy and positivism. It’s an encouraging way to end this set, so many of whose tracks have dwelt on the darker side of human emotion.


    British Symphonies LYRITA SRCD.2355 [GPJ] Classical Music Reviews: August 2016 - MusicWeb-International
     
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  10. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
    That post demands more than the normal like.
     
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  11. crispi

    crispi Vinyl Archaeologist

    Location:
    Berlin
    No love for Karajan’s later recording, done with the Wiener Philharmoniker shortly before his death? It’s a-mazing! (along with an equally great 7th done around the same time)
     
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  12. royzak2000

    royzak2000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London,England
  13. Mr Bass

    Mr Bass Chevelle Ma Belle

    Location:
    Mid Atlantic
    Debussy: Preludes for Piano Book 1 and 2. Yuri Egorov. EMI Angel promo

    Ah back to back Debussy Monsieur Royzak.

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  14. crispi

    crispi Vinyl Archaeologist

    Location:
    Berlin
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    Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
    6 Harpsichord Concerti

    Andreas Staier, harpsichord
    Freiburger Barockorchester
    Petra Müllejans


    HARMONIA MUNDI HMC 902083.84, (P) 2011

    Just finished listening to both CDs back to back and I cannot recommend them enough. This is inventive music, wonderfully played. The lower register of the Freiburger orchestra is to die for, those woodwinds sound absolutely magical. Very well recorded, too.
     
  15. Wes H

    Wes H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    I know the music (delightful concerti, in this case) and I know that Harmonia Mundi has released some terrific recordings, so this must be a great CD. Thus my "like," even though I've not heard this actual recording.

    Another for the big "wish list." :sigh:
     
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  16. NYMets41

    NYMets41 Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA

    Her voice seems so...effortless —
     
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  17. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
    I haven't listened to it in a long time. At some point I'll compare them. The "wing" series of LPs was my introduction to Bruckner--perhaps it's nostalgic.
     
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  18. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    I've not listened to this since back when I bought it - must remedy that. :)
     
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  19. NYMets41

    NYMets41 Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA

    I ended up also buying her Carmina Burana release—it’s something special.
     
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  20. hvbias

    hvbias Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    I have it in my listening queue, currently working my way through his songs. I can see why Takacs are critics favorites.
     
  21. Mr Bass

    Mr Bass Chevelle Ma Belle

    Location:
    Mid Atlantic

    Those are very fine well regarded performances. The only criticism I've seen has been the sonics.
     
  22. misterjones

    misterjones Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    The Takacs' Bartok? I don't think so, but I will if it's on Spotify. I have the Emerson String Quartet's version, which I thought was good when I listened to it. But some comparisons would be interesting. I'm a fan of the Guarneri String Quartet, but there's quite a bit of heavy breathing on their version.
     
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  23. ibanez_ax

    ibanez_ax Forum Resident

    Time to enter the cathedral.

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  24. ubertrout

    ubertrout Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Sad story, about how Egorov died much too young. I actually discovered him because a friend lent me an off-air tape he made of Egorov playing the Beethoven 3rd Piano Concerto accompanied by the Milwaukee Symphony and a young David Zinman conducting.
     
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  25. bluemooze

    bluemooze Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Frenchtown NJ USA
    Thanks for the tip! :tiphat:
     
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