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Moog minimoog model D

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Jerry c., Apr 8, 2019.

  1. Jerry c.

    Jerry c. Forum Resident Thread Starter

    I happen to have a **** ton of vintage effects... echoplex..memory man.. both MU-TRON phasors..(phasers)... the big 3 button maestro phaser.. EH and a/da flangers...etc
     
    Devin S likes this.
  2. Maurice likes this.
  3. Just be careful with some of those. Many pedals are designed to take the very low output of a guitar pickup, whereas a synth can output a very hot signal that might fry the guts of your more sensitive pedals. When using guitar pedals, it's best to send a very low output from your synth and then fix the volume by turning up the amp.

    Others out there might be able to explain the technical/electronic aspect of this better.
     
    Devin S and Archtop like this.
  4. Theloneliest Monk

    Theloneliest Monk Forum Resident

    Location:
    United States
    The Behringer Model D doesn’t sound anywhere near an actual Moog synth. Does it have to have be a model D? There are lots of options from Moog, several under $1000 (Sub Phatty, Sirin, Grandmother) and ~$1500 for a Sub 37. The Grandmother is only $599 and would probably give you a good idea of if you’re going to be into it long term and you’d have an actual synth and not something that feels just a shade above a toy like the Behringer. I’ve actually been considering splurging on a Sub37 personally, but just can’t seem to muster up the courage.

    Also, as far as amps, I don’t know if I’d send a full range analog synth through a guitar amp, maybe it’d be ok but I suspect the low frequencies of a keyboard could blow your speaker or damage the amp in some way.
     
  5. Jerry c.

    Jerry c. Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Thanks, I’ll keep that in mind. I’m still seeing very little reference to amplification preferences. I’m assuming that guitar amps were common in the 70’s .. but that no longer seems to be the case.
     
  6. Here's a clip of a Moog Minimoog Model D through an analog tape delay:

     
    2141 likes this.
  7. klockwerk

    klockwerk Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ohio USA
    Not enough real minimoogs available to real musicians, so you are just driving up the cost to get one. Yea, I am being something of a downer here. Get the Behringer minimoog knockoff, an eventide effects box and a decent keyboard and enjoy yourself (and the money you save).
     
    Chris DeVoe likes this.
  8. Jerry c.

    Jerry c. Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Yeah, I think it does. I really don’t want to settle because I know how I am. Of course there’s the risk ... but I have the cash. It won’t be the end of the world if it doesn’t work out.
     
    Devin S likes this.
  9. A solid state amp/mixer makes the most sense, since your not likely going to want the tube distortion most of the time, but like @Archtop mentioned, if you have an amp with enough headroom, it shouldn't matter too much. Still, a guitar amp is voiced for a certain frequency range and it'd be better to have a flat, un-colored amp that can reproduce those low bass rumbles perfectly.
     
    gregorya, 2141 and Archtop like this.
  10. Paul Gase

    Paul Gase Everything is cheaper than it looks.

    Location:
    California
    Hey, that didn’t stop Linda McCartney!:laugh:
     
    Stencil, Ryan Lux and Jerry c. like this.
  11. Theloneliest Monk

    Theloneliest Monk Forum Resident

    Location:
    United States
    I mentioned this above but only in an edit, using a guitar amp to amp a synth seems risky to me. I would not do it personally, as the synth can produce really low notes sustained indefinitely and it seems like a recipe for blowing out your speaker in your guitar amp.
     
  12. Theloneliest Monk

    Theloneliest Monk Forum Resident

    Location:
    United States
    I hear you! Of course, the Sub Phatty is only like $799 and the Sub37 is $1499 (IIRC), and you wouldn’t really be settling, they both, especially the 37, look like pretty serious synths. You could always add on the Model D later and then get them going in tandem. Then you could invite me over for a Kraftwerk play date. :laugh:
     
  13. Jerry c.

    Jerry c. Forum Resident Thread Starter

    I’m looking at the reissue. Though no longer currently in production, they’re still readily available.

    Though I’d not want to deprive a talented musician of a Moog, I’ve done 40 + years in the trenches while they were playing with their toys....so... yeah, not going to be losing sleep even if that were the case.
     
    2141 likes this.
  14. Moog + delay = audio bliss

     
    2141 likes this.
  15. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Sorry, it’s simply being untruthful saying that the Behringer “doesn’t sound anywhere near an actual Moog synth.”

     
  16. I agree, it's not fair to call the Behringer a toy. You're getting >85% of the tone of the Moog for less than 15% of the price.
     
  17. Of course, you don't have to actually use a keyboard to play a synthesizer. In the following video, the KorgMS20m is played live on an analog sequencer (Korg SQ1).

     
  18. Theloneliest Monk

    Theloneliest Monk Forum Resident

    Location:
    United States
    It does sound similar on a YouTube video played over computer speakers but from playing it in person I didn’t think that it sounded anywhere near the actual Moog synth. I’m not lying when I say this, it was my impression, you’re welcome to disagree but please don’t quote my post and say that I’m lying. It’s a bit of a dick move.
     
  19. Synthfreek

    Synthfreek Drum machines are not inherently evil.

    Whatever. I say a dick move is calling my suggestion that is less than 1/10 the price of the real deal a toy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2019
  20. The Les Paul analogy mentioned above is correct. A budget $350 Epiphone looks and sounds >90% as good as a $3000 custom shop Gibson. You’re paying for the craftsmanship and prestige (look what I have!). Same thing with a $200 Squier vs a $1600 Fender US pro series Strat. The Moog vs Behringer thing is the same.
     
    Chris DeVoe and 2141 like this.
  21. Todd68

    Todd68 I'm Listening

    Location:
    Pelham, Ontario
    If you want a Minimoog, get it. I have never regretted getting mine. Like I said, it opened up a world of new musical exploration to me. I have been playing music for near 40 years and the Moog is simply an inspiration machine (The Grandmother is superb too). Don't settle, get what you want if you are able. A creative tool like the Minimoog has been priceless to me. the build quality is second to none. You are also supporting an American company that is partly owned by its employees.
     
    2141 likes this.
  22. Devin S

    Devin S Just slightly ahead of my time

    Nothing sounds better than a Moog through a good vintage phaser and some tape delay. Just buy it. You will not be disappointed.
     
    2141 likes this.
  23. Todd68

    Todd68 I'm Listening

    Location:
    Pelham, Ontario
    Agreed. Add some reverb too.
     
    2141 and Devin S like this.
  24. There are many synths with more features, modulation routings and sonic possibilities, but for pure vintage tone - nothing beats a Model D.

    It’s also amazing that Uli Behringer was able to clone it so well for such a great price.
     
    2141 likes this.
  25. SlimLee

    SlimLee Forum Resident

    Location:
    Melbourne
    As an owner of a MiniMoog Voyager, I would never consider selling it to pocket the change from a Behringer. Even if it is ~85% of the sound, there's an aesthetic pleasure that comes from playing a nice piece of gear that can be the tipping point for some solid creative inspiration. And it's such a joy to sit there and explore the sounds it can create. I say go for it.
     
    TLMusic and 2141 like this.

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