OLED TV/Monitor Owner Thread ver. Dolby Vision is neat

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by White_Noise, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Just keep in mind that the meat of a display is its panel technology and there are only two panel manufacturers that supply to Sony and all the other competitors and those two are Samsung and LG. What makes other competitors like Sony more expensive are the picture rendering adjustments which can be quite sophisticated, sturdier construction using higher quality materials that integrate and electronically keep stable the panel display quality over longer use.

    It's just like a $3000 camera lens over my $80 kit lens for my DSLR. Both can capture pretty much the same image in rendering quality but the higher priced lens is most likely made of metal parts with weather, dust and water proof seals, slightly better lens coatings and glass design to reduce lens flare and chromatic edge artifacts compared to my cheap lens that is made of plastic, no seals, but with pretty much the same glass design quality except in some shots flare and chromatic edge artifacts might be more pronounced and the focus ring is a bit loose requiring constant manual readjustment.

    Basically the devil is in the details and no consumer can know everything about why one product that functions the same as another is at a higher price.

    I know from experience that I won't buy a Vizio over a Samsung even if both are below $300. Really, there's that much of a difference even in the cheap stuff. I'm a digital photographer and am very picky about color and sharpness for obvious reasons and I saw huge differences in a recent purchase of those two competing HDtv model brands.
     
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  2. Jerry Horne

    Jerry Horne The Division Bell 1994|25|2019

    Location:
    West Coast
    I just purchased a C9 and I’m very satisfied thus far. It’s my first OLED so I don’t have much to compare it to. More as I dig in.
     
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  3. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    I'm doing it - I've got my Craiglists ad up selling my 65" OLED so I can get some cash toward the 77".

    Someone talk me out of this.

    Serious question: Could I just move my chair 12" closer to my existing TV and get the same effect for less money??
     
  4. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    I'm not the right person to talk you out of this as I skipped the 65" altogether and went from a 60" Kuro to a 77" C9.

    No one ever complained that their screen is too big. If/when they make wallpaper OLEDs that cover the entire wall I'll be first in line.
     
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  5. SamS

    SamS Forum Legend

    Location:
    Texas
    Although I do have a 65" C7 in my living room, my media room is still rocking a 10 year old 60" Kuro :) Curious if you considered a projector, instead of the 77"? It's a decision I've been struggling with.
     
  6. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Or maybe just view with 1.50x power reading glasses. I tried this out moving closer from 7ft. to 3ft. to my Samsung 720p 32" watching Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" BD. See below...

    [​IMG]

    Don't see why it wouldn't work on your OLED screen.
     
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  7. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    HDR is a lot more difficult to do with projection, but anything is possible given enough time, money, and room.
     
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  8. Kiko1974

    Kiko1974 Forum Resident

    What is the highest nit level achieved by the best home projector? I think projectors have always been for a minority and demanding kind of videophile but it seems this is changing because of TV sets bigger and bigger sizes and better technology that provide high light output (there's a Sony LCD set that has a light output of around 3000 nits or higher, I don't know if this is true) with high contrast. It looks like home HDR wasn't conceived with projectors in mind.
     
  9. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    "Home projector" is kind of a loose subject. I think the reality is that the amount of wattage and light output required to hit HDR numbers is going to be elusive for anything under $10,000. And then getting that calibrated to any kind of known standard will be difficult. The reality is that only laser projectors can do 100 nits in a theatrical (dark) environment, particularly with a big screen; the Christine 6P 4K Laser projectors at the Chinese Theater cost in the neighborhood of $750,000, but they're lighting up a 90-foot screen. And I was told they suck something like 20 amps of power and require lots of cooling, which you're not going to be able to easily do in a house.

    I was a home projector guy for a long time, but I gradually came to the conclusion that an OLED screen yields much better performance for less money (and less noise and space). Even if you spent $10,000 for a 100" OLED TV set, that's a lot cheaper than trying to get a comparable projector that could really do 4K HDR at home. I don't think anything more than 1000 nits is practical for home use -- bear in mind that's ten times the brightness of a conventional TV set.
     
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  10. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    After watching my TV more this week I'm keeping it. I don't need the 77" right now.

    Maybe in a year or 2 and then then this TV will go to my mom's house.
     
  11. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    Ugh, upgrade-itis hit me.

    Sold my OLED65e7 for $1100 locally.
    Bought an OLED65e9 for $1999 + tax. (Will be delivered Thursday - or later - I don't trust FedEx.)

    So I spent $1000 to get a 2 year newer TV - probably will look the same.

    But many peopel on this forum have done similar things for speakers/turntables - so I figured I'd do it to "fit in."
     
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  12. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV - US
    I bought an LG OLED 65" earlier this year, after seeing the 77" model thought about upgrading for a couple of minutes the price was more than
    double the 65" model. Guess I will stick with the 65".
     
  13. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
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  14. Al Kuenster

    Al Kuenster Forum Resident

    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV - US
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  15. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    I recently replaced an ancient JVC with a 2018 55" B8 OLED LG. No buyer's remorse (I extremely pleased with my 55" B7), but I'm curious about the note over at rtings that the B8 is not 'future-proof' as the B9. Is that in reference to B9's HDMI 2.1 advantage over the B8?
     
  16. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    How does HDMI connection have an advantage and what would that advantage comprise. The only special advantage I could see with my Samsung HDtv was between my two HDMI ports where one is connected to my rather old Sony BD player and the other to my Spectrum cable box in that I can adjust the HDtv picture settings when playing a BD and it saves those settings separately for the player after switching back to my cable box which has different picture settings, but that implies theres some kind of ROM chip for each port which I'm guessing requires HDMI updating for better communication with these chips.

    Maybe there's better down mixing surround sound Dolby audio to stereo that communicates better with newer Dolby standards for disc media that has it. I have so many BD discs with varying Dolby standard iterations I don't even bother with making it work.

    The original Star Trek movie BD which is has older Dolby standards is the only disc so far that attenuates vocals against loud effects so I don't have to reach for the volume control. Newer BD's with newer Dolby standards don't read the audio DRC settings I set on my BD player.
     
  17. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    I was ref
    I was referring to the increased bandwidth that HDMI 2.1 is capable of, almost 3 times that of HDMI 2.0 , will improve 4K frame rate when all of the proper equipment is available. I think I answered my own question actually. The 2019 are 'future-proof' with the 2.1 even though it may be a while before it can be used.
     
  18. tomhayes

    tomhayes Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
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  19. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Wow! Bandwidth issues with 4K requiring an HDMI pipeline upgrade. Is that with the 32bit/96K audio? Pushing that much data through hair thin wires I'm surprised there hasn't been a fire.
     
  20. I got a B8 65 inch about a year ago. It got calibrated by Kevin Miller from the old "Perfect Vision" days as he lives about 15 miles from myself.
    When it came between the B8 vs. C8 the better chip in the latter caused the C8 to be $400 more at that time and the longer stand bottom was problematic for me, and Best Buy also gave me $200 credit so the whole price difference was about $600. It works with my Oppo 203 perfectly and a higher hdmi spec of 2.2 does not affect me.
    I came from a Samsung j5500 so any oled was to be revelatory. Its a great set and during calibration I asked Kevin in all honesty what does the C8 offer more in quality. It has a higher chip, the 9 chip, and in quality it has about 75 more nits in brightness and can be a better WebOS match for the future. Its a great set and in a few years Ill get the next Lg set with a 10 ? chip. Take care, John M.
     
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  21. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    For these HDMI updates, will all HDMI cables still work and use all the advancements made by 2.1, etc?
     
  22. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    Absolutely not. You need new cables, but good ones are very affordable.
     
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  23. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    I naively thought an HDMI cable is an HDMI cable, and it's the hardware/software the allows for the actual upgrades. How can I tell if the new cables deliver the HDMI upgrades? Will they be labeled as such?
     
  24. GregM

    GregM Senior Member

    Location:
    Daddyland, CA
    I think there is a way to tell from the cable markings but in my case I had cables that were nearly 10 years old, so I knew they were outdated. Initially I only bought new cables for my new components (OLED and Apple TV 4k), but it resulted in such severe handshake issues that I then upgraded all my other cables as well as my TiVo and preamp. The issue is that HDMI is a two-way technology and I wasn't very diligent about turning off the CEC, resulting in major headaches. Even when (I think) all CEC options were set off, I still had handshake issues. It's an exercise in futility to try to dial in your system when there are older HDMI cables involved, at least for me. These are the ones I went with.

    https://amzn.to/2IFRZ0w
     
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  25. supermd

    supermd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Campbell, CA
    Thank you!

    Edit: This article seems to be saying what I initially thought, that new cables probably aren't necessary for most people.

    Why you probably don't need to upgrade your HDMI cables
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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