Peter Frampton "For 55 million streams of, ‘Baby I Love Your Way’, I got $1,700,"

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Tone, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Speak for yourself, I'll be releasing grades.
     
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  2. eflatminor

    eflatminor Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kalifornia
    My apologizes if I came across as curt. I take seriously issues of private property and the contractual relationships that define that property.
     
    lazydawg58 likes this.
  3. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Plonk.
     
    TonyCzar likes this.
  4. eflatminor

    eflatminor Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kalifornia
    Not an argument.
     
  5. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    No problem, I probably came across a little snarky myself.
     
    eflatminor likes this.
  6. J_D__

    J_D__ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Mooresville, NC
    I’m sure Peter made some good money from his Stadium show tours?
     
    longdist01 likes this.
  7. Memph

    Memph Active Member

    Location:
    Thunder Bay, ON
    I use last.fm to track how much I listen to different albums/tracks and a friend I follow on there has just crossed 15,000 streams on his favourite album (released less than a year ago). That's equal to about 10 copies of the same album so the artist is going to get a lot more revenue than they would have pre-streaming.

    I will have streamed my favourite albums of the year about 1000 times each for a total of about 23,000 streams this year, which is equivalent to about 16 album purchases in terms of streaming payouts. That's definitely more than how many albums I would typically purchase in a year.
     
  8. BDC

    BDC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tacoma
    Yeah better we do it the modern way, let corporations make all the money.
     
    tages likes this.
  9. Memph

    Memph Active Member

    Location:
    Thunder Bay, ON
    That would be equivalent to something like 12 billion streams a year for the average top 100 act... Actually that's probably not too far off, the #1 act is probably getting about that much, while the average is probably a little under half that for the top 100 acts.
     
  10. Liam Brown

    Liam Brown Forum Resident

    i have a song that got on a spotify playlist and had 1.5 million plays. i've seen not a single penny. not one. certainly makes it seem pointless to bother putting out music. someone made (a little) money somewhere on that song. just wasn't the person who wrote it and played on it. i'm getting screwed not only by record companies, but now tech ones are piling on too. its not only rich old rock stars getting the shaft here.
     
  11. BDC

    BDC Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tacoma
    From where I'm sitting, neither the consumer nor the artist is best served with streaming and 50-$1000 concert tickets. I'd like to see artists get paid for product again. I buy tons of product, but rarely go to shows. For me the product is almost always better than the show, and I came up going to shows for 12 or 13 bucks. I will never come away from a $100 show not feeling ripped off, thus rarely go to them, and I can actually afford it.....Principal

    The music I listen to comes from artists that are almost invariably bad at business.They swim unprotected in a sea of sharks. Without some intervention, supply and demand never favors labor, musicians the labor in this case.
     
    TonyCzar likes this.
  12. I go to plenty of shows and most cost me $15-35. Maybe occasionally up to $50 to $75 and most are in clubs.

    I’ve seen all the legacy acts when they were in their prime so I rarely need to see them again for several hundred dollars.

    There are plenty of great artists to see st reasonable prices and then but their album at their merch table.

    Would rather do this than stream.
     
  13. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    There is probably a guy or gal with an acoustic guitar playing for no cover at your local sports bar, pub or coffee shop fairly often. They are probably as good or better than a lot of high dollar shows you could go see. Put a $10 in the tip jar and if they have a CD for sell get one. Order a burger and a couple of beers, tip the waitress and after all is said and done you've spent less then $60. You'll leave with a full stomach, (maybe a slight buzz), and a head full of nice tunes.
     
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  14. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    It's not an either-or we're talkin 10 bucks a month. Surely you spend more than that on drinks at shows.
     
  15. stollar

    stollar Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bærum Norway
    Like it or not streaming is here to stay, having said that the way artists are
    paid today leaves a lot to be desired.
     
    uzn007 and longdist01 like this.
  16. It’s not the money at all for me. I probably pay 5k a year on physical music formats and live shows. I know the artists don’t always get more but I feel I’ve specifically supported certain acts this way. And I like the quality better. And the artwork.
     
  17. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Virtually all my physical CD purchases these days are from the artist themselves at the merch table.
     
    Mazzy likes this.
  19. nojmplease

    nojmplease Forum Resident

    Location:
    DC
    True, but another way to look at it is: in any other era, you probably would have had at most a few thousand "plays" from people hearing you perform live. And that's it.

    In no other era could everyday artists so easily reach such an enormous, diverse and widespread audience as they can today. That's pretty awesome.
     
  20. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Exactly! There dozens of ways for an aspiring artist to reach their audience without having to give anything up...in fact for free.
     
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  21. Liam Brown

    Liam Brown Forum Resident

    this is a good point.
     
  22. TonyCzar

    TonyCzar Forum Resident

    Location:
    PhIladelphia, PA
    I'm not a starchaser who pursues conversations with artists at their merch tables, but I went to buy some vinyls from the table at a $15 show, and the LPs were on a "pay what you want" basis, which flummoxed me, and, well, there she was. (Now, the label in question was for a "major indie": an indie oriented label with wide name recognition if you've been following the business for a number of years.)

    She offered the explanation that the records were "paid for": she had to buy them from $MajorIndieLabel, and hoped to make back more selling them on the road than she had paid to acquire them. Horrified, I overpaid (I hope), but still felt like slitting my wrists at the reality of it all. When I finally got home, I comforted myself with the idea that, rather than being a traditional album purchase at a store from which she'd see $1.50 (?), she now had one less piece of band candy to dump or schlep back home or make Mom sell at work. So, one less practical burden to answer.

    I didn't solve all of the industry's problems with my custom, but I think I helped somebody.

    Signed, still shockable at my advanced age.
     
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  23. Chris DeVoe

    Chris DeVoe Forum Resident

    Yeah, one of the obnoxious parts of a major label contract is that an artist is compelled to buy the merch from the label at a price far higher than stores. It's definitely a case of adding insult to injury, especially as the promo copies come out of the artists royalties.
     
    TonyCzar likes this.
  24. TonyCzar

    TonyCzar Forum Resident

    Location:
    PhIladelphia, PA
    Do you really think two (let's say three) distinct stadium tours sets somebody up for life, even if they're "careful" and "wise"?

    His first stadium show in Philly was at JFK in 1976... opening for Yes. He came back for 1 round of gravy in 1977 as a headliner.

    Granted, it's a bigger windfall than most working musicians see in a lifetime, but lottery winners end up broke, too.
     
    uzn007 likes this.
  25. snowman872

    snowman872 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wilcox, AZ
    Yes, it is likely much more money than "normal" forks will see their entire lifetime. If rock stars don't have the foresight to invest their earnings properly and realize their career could all end tomorrow, that's their problem. It's called retirement planning. It would help a lot if they stopped snorting half of it up their nose.
     
    Doggiedogma likes this.

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