Recent used vinyl price increases: what are the most surprising titles?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by rain_king, Jun 22, 2022.

  1. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    Are you sure about one runs on Buffett? After his big hit and a couple of lesser hits WSCPC, A1A, Livin' & Dyin' certainly got represses and big bumps in their total sales. I remember some were pressed with the either "Best Buy" or "Nice Price" whichever MCA used. Also, john Prine's resurgence occurred a few years before his death. He got a real resurgence from the Americana crowd and his catalog as best I can remember has remained relatively high for years. I don't think any of his albums have ever been $5 records on the used market. But heck, my memory ain't what it use to be so I could have that all wrong.
     
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  2. zbarbera

    zbarbera A stereo's a stereo. Art is forever!

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Agreed. I’ve sort of been saying I don’t think he translated to young listeners so much and they’ve been cheap so long I think most of the existing fan base that wants it on record already has what they want. I’m sure there will be a bit of a jump but he still doesn’t have the alt cred that Prine did. Prine’s first has always been valuable and the rest were never cheap but not like they are now.

    If I had to bet, I’d say there will be a few of his albums that end up topping out at around $20 and will stick there. Everything else will remain in the $5 bin. I don’t think any of the 80s albums will reach $10.

    Of course, as always these days, there’s a chance a song gets “rediscovered” and that album could skyrocket. Especially with the lack of reissues.
     
  3. zbarbera

    zbarbera A stereo's a stereo. Art is forever!

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    You’re giving me homework on Thanskgiving?! Ok, went back through. A1A got a 2016 reissue. Nothing else since the early 80s (81 for Living and Dying in 3/4 Time).

    Agree 100% on Prine. For a long time only the first fetched over $20. A lot of the others hovered around $10. Then he was rediscovered and they all shot up.
     
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  4. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    That's what I was talking about. Those albums were repressed throughout the 1970s, not just an initial pressing as someone said in the thread. They sold as new records for a decade or so, thus there are a bunch of used copies out there, keeping prices down to a reasonable cost. I wasn't referring to "vinyl resurgence" reissues.
     
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  5. zbarbera

    zbarbera A stereo's a stereo. Art is forever!

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    But it is what I was talking about. No new pressings in circulation in over 40 years. There are not a bunch of used copies out there. The more I look the more odd I find this for someone with such huge hits. The numbers for sale are miniscule. On Discogs:

    White Sport Coat: 31 vinyl copies for sale
    A1A: 46
    Living and Dying: 73
    Havana Daydeamin’: 69
    Changes in Latitudes: 120
    Son of a Son: 172
    Volcano: 170

    Round out the 70s with 6 vinyl copies of Down to Earth. And that’s a decade of albums and less than 700 total for sale. Back to our Jacksons and Prince comparison. There are 1670 vinyl copies of Victory and 1640 of Around the World for sale.

    Update: I’m an analyst by profession so once I start looking at these things I like to dig more! Anyway. eBay has smaller numbers than Discogs. Seems like Buffett albums are actually kinda quietly scarce.

    I’m going to corner the market and become the Buffett vinyl tycoon!

    Update 2: I didn’t include Rancho Deluxe because it’s a soundtrack. But just checked. There is one vinyl copy for sale on Discogs and 2 on eBay. For $240 and $400!!!! That’s some wishful thinking. Except looking at the history it looks to be going for anywhere from $15-80. Crazy stuff.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2023
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  6. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    Crazy stuff indeed. I saw Buffett for the first time in 74 at a local college and the auditorium was maybe half full, probably 300 in attendance. And around that time I got tickets to a club for my brother to see him (I was 16 at the time so underage) that holds maybe 400. It was actually the club where he dubbed his backing band, just a 2nd guitarists at that point I think, "The Corral Reefer Band" as a joke. The next time was around 1980 and he was a co-headliner with The Outlaws at the basketball arena at ECU. It was oversold, maybe 8 or 9K packed in there. It was only after he started touring the Shed circuit that the Parrethead following got huge. My point being that he was more of a steady draw that gradually built up to become huge I guess in the mid to late 1980s(?) and the same thing held true for his record sales. His albums from 1973 to 1976, his best albums didn't ever even go gold. Changes (1977) and Son (1978) went platinum and Volcano (1979) went gold. Nothing in the 1980s sold big but maybe the boxset (?) and a compilation but he was huge as a touring draw and investing in his businesses. Then in the 1990s those less significant albums were pretty much all Gold or Platinum but of course these would have been almost all CD sales not vinyl.

    Those records are mostly sitting in folks like me, in their 60s and 70s record collections. They don't flood the used market but come in slowly as people die or sell their record collections.
     
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  7. zbarbera

    zbarbera A stereo's a stereo. Art is forever!

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    That alone can’t explain how few copies there are out there for sale. It would be the same for every band that was moderately popular at the time.

    And I realized those Discogs numbers include the “not available in the United States” copies that I assume are dead inventory or inactive sellers. Which upon double checking means there isn’t a single copy of Rancho Deluxe on vinyl available on Discogs.

    Numbers available that low and prices that low and a distinct lack of reissues just says there is no demand. For someone that had such a live following it seems like an anomaly.
     
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  8. Limopard

    Limopard National Dex #143

    Location:
    Leipzig, Germany
    "Prostitute", a rather minor Alphaville album from 1994 was re-released last week (the first time) on vinyl. The average price is about 65 € for the 2 LP-Set. Simple black vinyl, nothing coloured. For anyone who thought, New Order's Substance is expensive...
     
  9. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    A friend worked as engineer on that album! If this isn’t mega limited prices are going to come down eventually. It’s not an especially well known Alphaville record.
     
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  10. Limopard

    Limopard National Dex #143

    Location:
    Leipzig, Germany
    Bought the DoCD for 23 €. I really loved the album at the time of release. This has diminished a bit, but there are some worthwile cuts on it, the last two tracks (Euphoria/Apollo) are still great.
     
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  11. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    I think much of his fan base were CD buyers not vinyl collectors (we are relatively small subgroup) and / or there for the party, content with a compilation or the boxset.
     
  12. zbarbera

    zbarbera A stereo's a stereo. Art is forever!

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Most of his discography wasn't released on cd until '87 or later. Songs You Know By Heart was released on cd in 85. Beyond that if you wanted to own his music you were listening to cassettes or buying vinyl that hadn't been pressed since '81.
     
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  13. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    It’s hilarious how many recent titles are currently fetching good money and one literally would have to check their collections every few weeks to stay on top of the game.

    Only last night I’ve discovered this:

    The Sounds - Living In America

    In 2002 there was no vinyl version of Swedish synth poppers The Sounds great debut album “Living In America” so when Music On Vinyl did one in 2018 it was more than welcome.

    They also reissued - equally great - sophomore set “Dying To Say This To You” which did have an US only vinyl pressing in 2005 but that always had been not especially easy to find. Now the MOV is even more expensive:

    The Sounds - Dying To Say This To You
     
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  14. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    Wasn't that (1990s to 2010s) his peak in popularity as a live performer? If so then CD buyers would have been most of his merch sales. The vinyl records released from 1973 to 1979 or so were the original fans favorites and these fans would be those most likely to be crate diggers. The folks that became, "Parrotheads" were mostly those that came later and for the party. They probably had / have less of an emotional connection with vinyl and the album cuts from those early great records. That Boxset he put out and that sold well probably was all most of them needed. Unless Buffett is rediscovered by a later generation of vinyl enthusiasts I don't think vinyl reissues / represses / remasters / RSD / UHQRs are in the cards.
     
  15. rain_king

    rain_king Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    California
    I wouldn't say the vinyl resurgence is purely a boomer thing. Boomers more than anyone else abandoned vinyl in droves in the '90s; my sense is that it was largely Xers and Millennials, nostalgic for the connection they had with physical media in their childhood, who originally spurred the revival in the 2000s. I'm sure it's true that the audiophile reissue stuff skews heavily boomer, but that's only part of the overall resurgence.

    The other technologies you mentioned are different in that they are truly obsolete; aside from a few eccentrics and hobbyists, no one uses floppy disks, multi-volume encyclopedias, or rotary phones. No one is producing these things or their accessories anymore on any kind of scale. Vinyl appeared to have met a similar fate for about 15 years, until it started selling again, and kept selling.

    That being said, I do think it's all a bit of a bubble and despite the revival having lasted for almost 2 decades at this point, I still think it has faddish elements that are sort of hard to see because its continued popularity has surprised pretty much everyone. I do think vinyl sales will go down significantly over the next 10 years, and will eventually settle to a level higher than, say, 1998 but lower than any time in the past decade. However, I actually think the decline will have more to do with Millennials and Zoomers, rather than Boomers, losing interest.
     
  16. lazydawg58

    lazydawg58 Know enough to know how much I don't know

    Location:
    Lillington NC
    You just never can tell.
     

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