SH Spotlight Recording and Mastering Questions---Answered here. Any more?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Steve Hoffman, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. Sgt Pepper

    Sgt Pepper Forum Resident

    Location:
    United Kingdom
    We have been reading much debate in various threads about the Sgt Pepper 2017 Stereo remix performed by the team at Abbey Road headed by Giles Martin, just wondering if you have heard it and if so what is your opinion on the mastering etc.?
     
  2. youraveragevinylcollector

    youraveragevinylcollector Forum Resident

    Location:
    Commerce, GA
    I haven't any time to read the forum, but, if there was any album that you'd want to remaster, what album would you do? One that deserves a proper remaster, or one you think you'd have fun with? Also, what would you consider your "definitive work?"
     
  3. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    White Album. Second question, I don't play Sophie's Choice with my babies.
     
  4. Sgt Pepper

    Sgt Pepper Forum Resident

    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Steve, did you see my post?
     
  5. Grant

    Grant That really swings!

    Location:
    United States
    It's Tuesday. He's probably in the studio today.:shrug:
     
  6. spice9

    spice9 Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY
    I don't speak for our host, of course, but he has been asked this several times in other threads and has declined to comment. He does not comment on the mastering or remastering efforts of others. Professional courtesy.
     
    Bern, izgoblin, showtaper and 7 others like this.
  7. Grant

    Grant That really swings!

    Location:
    United States
    Well, he has, and he does, but he chooses his words carefully. It is indeed a professional courtesy to not criticize or get personal about a peer's work. That is because they have to sometimes rely on each other. How professional would it be for these pros to go at each other, especially in public?
     
    McLover, Sgt Pepper and snkcube like this.
  8. Claus

    Claus Eating is a need, enjoying is an art.

    Location:
    Germany
    ...maybe Steve don't want answer the question
     
    DRM likes this.
  9. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    Not cheaper. Many studios and their clients preferred it for their recording sessions. Nobody knew then that SSS was going to be an issue, until those tapes got age on them. 3M also had a few formulas which did the same issue. 226 and 996 known offenders also.
     
    Grant likes this.
  10. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    They are not. Want a LA2A, you need a real one. Want the real thing, you need the real thing. None of the DAW versions are even close.
     
    CrankSomeFrank likes this.
  11. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    Yes, Scotch 226 was a major offender for sticky shed. As bad or worse than Ampex 406 or 456. Never had issues out of Scotch 206 or 250, both solid reliable tape which has so far stood the test of time.
     
  12. Grant

    Grant That really swings!

    Location:
    United States
    The formulas even hit consumer prerecorded tape stock. I had a couple of cassettes that had the problem. It took about ten years for the problem to manifest itself. I tried to bake one of the tapes, but I guess I didn't cook it long enough or hot enough, as I didn't know exactly how it was done.
     
  13. Litejazz53

    Litejazz53 Enjoying the Beauty of "Crystal Clear" Digital

    Steve, from what I have seen, mastering for vinyl is an unforgiving process, placing songs with a robust high end at the beginning of records, and songs with less high frequencies in the middle of the record. Some have said juggling all the precautionary stuff to insure a vinyl recording is as close to perfect as possible, takes a mastering artist, limitations that you don't see on digital. What are your thoughts on mastering for records VS mastering for digital?
     
    ParloFax and DRM like this.
  14. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Nonsense. Was that way in 1960 maybe, not any more. Records are cut so well now (hopefully) that there really isn't any "shuffling" at all. The limitations are GOOD for the sound. You cannot boost the treble too much, you cannot boost the bass too much, you cannot make it too loud, etc. These are good rules, not limitations. This is one of the reasons that vinyl can sound better than digital, a deaf operator can't go crazy.
     
    McLover, Dmann201, Shiver and 12 others like this.
  15. lrpm

    lrpm Forum Resident

    Location:
    Barcelona, Spain
    Bumping my couple of questions
    Of course please delete my post if the question is not appropriate for this thread, thanks!
     
  16. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    Not all cinema theatres are dead. The Chinese here in LA is the opposite, giant room echo smearing all the details in the music score. In the old days, movie music was recorded dry as was recorded music. In the early 1950's, the Hi-Fi craze started to add reverb to make the music sound more exciting, etc.

    Studios are dead acoustically as they should be. We can't know how the listener is experiencing the music, I personally just hope for the best.
     
    showtaper likes this.
  17. lrpm

    lrpm Forum Resident

    Location:
    Barcelona, Spain
    Ok, Then I suppose dead is better. Many thanks
     
  18. latheofheaven

    latheofheaven My Pants are FULLY Analog...

    There you go... Keep as much crap as possible OUT of the signal path. That's the way my listening setup is (or tries to be...)
     
    Dave likes this.
  19. latheofheaven

    latheofheaven My Pants are FULLY Analog...

    Axiomatic...
     
  20. onlyacanvasky

    onlyacanvasky Forum Resident

    Just a quick one, maybe a bit more technical - In the early days of tape, say, 1950-51, were most major companies running machines at 30 ips? The reason I ask is that over time we'd sort of gotten used to careless reissues of things, and original releases that sometimes didn't always show all of what was on those tapes, and then years later we hear re-releases made from the masters - say, Louis Armstrong's Decca cuts or Perry Como at Victor - and they sound amazing, both rich and sparkling at the same time, without a breath of tape hiss.

    I'm sure they had great engineers and equipment to achieve such amazing sound, but did they also have 30 ips tape helping them out?
     
  21. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    1948 to about 1953, 30 ips, yes. As the second generation of Ampex machines came out, the speed slowed t0 15 ips. All companies slowed with them except Decca who continued to record "B WIND" 30 ips until the machines were replaced around 1966.
     
    rxcory, Dave and onlyacanvasky like this.
  22. onlyacanvasky

    onlyacanvasky Forum Resident

    Thanks! It's great that they were using it to capture the amazing sounds everyone was making.
     
  23. dartira

    dartira rise and shine like a far out superstar

    Roughly, an ideal room will be largely dead, with some live elements (wood is great) so your ears don't go crazy.
    Its dimensions should be so that frequency dips and peaks are mostly avoided (rectangular-ish, high/sloping ceiling).
    Any remaining imperfections can then be addressed by using absorbing and diffusing materials.
    Easier said than done, but doable.
     
  24. youraveragevinylcollector

    youraveragevinylcollector Forum Resident

    Location:
    Commerce, GA
    I've got another question, I'm not sure if it has been answered. What was the first album you ever remastered/remixed/worked on?
     
  25. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Mastering Engineer Your Host Thread Starter

    1982, a Milton Brown and his Brownies LP.
     

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