RELEASE (Peter Tork)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by cdice, Jun 20, 2005.

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  1. cdice

    cdice New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    U.S.
    When Peter Tork left the Monkees in 1968, he had a new group--with his then girlfriend--called RELEASE. Are there any demos, home recordings, etc. floating around of this band? Who else was in the band besides Peter & his girlfriend?
     
  2. reechie

    reechie Senior Member

    Location:
    Baltimore
    To the best of my knowledge, and I was a big time Monkees collector for awhile there, nothing from "Release" ever made it to the collector's circuit. Certainly "Release" never got past the recording stage, if it ever actually got that far. Drug problems and other concerns (including a Mexican drug bust which netted Tork some jail time) quickly doomed the "Release" project, and Tork pretty much dropped out of the music scene altogether for a long time.

    I remember seeing a picture of "Release" in Glenn A. Baker's Monkeemania book, but I don't recall if there was a mention of who was in the band.
     
  3. yellowballoon

    yellowballoon Senior Member

    Location:
    Maine
    The other members in RELEASE were
    Peter Tork-guitar and vocals
    Reine Stewart on drums
    Riley Cummings on bass

    Peter disappears into obscurity in 1969. He makes a TV appearance on Dick Clark's Happening, makes a couple of club appearances, photographed for Tiger Beat, and records a few demos. He later gets busted for hash and spends time in jail before retiring to become a teacher before he started performing again in 1977. Peter never had much of a career other then The Monkees and performing live..he's lost in the studio!

    YB
     
  4. cdice

    cdice New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    U.S.
    I'm hoping to see Peter Tork on July 9th. If I get to actually talk to him, I'll see what he says about RELEASE demos, etc.
     
  5. reechie

    reechie Senior Member

    Location:
    Baltimore
    Well, let's be fair here, Peter DID finally get his recording career going, though it took him until 1982 to get his first 45 out, "Higher And Higher" b/w "(I'm Not Your) Stepping Stone". Since then, he's put out a fine solo CD, 1994's Stranger Things Have Happened (featuring appearances by Micky Dolenz and Michael Neamith), a couple of duet CD's with James Lee Stanley, and some releases with his Shoe Suede Blues Band. It took him a while to get his act together, but he's hardly "lost in the studio." :)

    http://www.petertork.com
     
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  6. yellowballoon

    yellowballoon Senior Member

    Location:
    Maine
    LOL!!! wait til you read Sandoval's book.. his starts..stops..re starts..scraps..stops again..oh yeah yet another re-record during his late 67-early 68 dates...one word...LOST!
    Then do this..compare his dates next to Mike's and Davy's from the same weeks... one word...LOST! Even Hank Cicalo, who was engineering for him couldn't stand it any longer and refused to do any more work for him..he went to work w/ Nez instead and never looked back.

    In the end Screen Gems refused him grooves on Birds and Bees. They joked that he spent the same amount of money on "Lady's Baby" that Wilson did on "Good Vibrations". The song still sounds like it could've been recorded in one session had Nesmith been producing.

    It took Peter 24 years to put out his 1994 solo release, and then only with a lot of help from James Lee Stanley. He's promished his follow up since ...LOL!! LOST!

    ;)
    YB
     
  7. reechie

    reechie Senior Member

    Location:
    Baltimore
    Welp, I tried... :sigh:
     
  8. cdice

    cdice New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    U.S.
    For what it's worth, when my wife & I saw The Monkees a few years ago in Reno, NV, Peter gave a little speech about his battles with alcohol, which I had no idea about, and I thought I knew just about everything with regards to The Monkees! He said (at that time) that he had been clean-and-sober for 14 years, and then he pulled a coin out of his pocket and began rubbing it with his thumb. Maybe his alcohol problem, complicated with his use of "chronic" is why he never got much accomplished in his early days after his departure in 1968 (from the original foursome)........just my mind wondering.....he seems to have his act together now. It's funny, no, not really funny, but sad come to think of it: I have a bootleg CD of Davy Jones (recorded live in Circleville, Ohio of all places), where he talks about his demons with alcohol and punching a hole in the ceiling of a house he was renting at the time in England, and I read another story about a time Micky Dolenz appearently was sitting in the middle of the street with a bottle of scotch totally blotto and Harry Nilsson had to literally pick him up and drag him into the house to keep him from getting run-over. (This was when Dolenz & Nilsson were neighbors at 2441 Horseshoe Canyon Drive in Hollywood, or so the story goes.) I've heard Michael Nesmith loves his red wine. It's sad to think the pressures of "the business" could have drove them to alcohol excess....
     
  9. yellowballoon

    yellowballoon Senior Member

    Location:
    Maine
    I think the real truth about Peter Tork is the reason he dropped out of the business was because he's just a musician, not a star. He couldn't keep up with the egos of Mike, Davy and Micky, nor could he keep up with them creatively. It becomes pretty obvious, reading Sandoval's book that no one on the project wanted to work with him because of this. He got his part because he stumbled through his interviews and they knew they had their "dummy", though the ironic fact is, he's not a dummy.

    Tork drove to alcohol in the late 60s because he needed something to fill the emptiness. His story is no different then the millions of people this disease effects every day.
    Still the point is, Peter could play guitar, write a song, but when it came to getting that song to a finished place..it took Peter a long time to achieve this. It still does.

    YB
     
  10. RayistaGeoff

    RayistaGeoff Forum Resident

    Much as this pains me to admit, I gotta agree with this. I completely love his stuff from Head "Can You Dig It?" and "Do I Have To Do This...", but I have yet hear any bootleg/bonus tracks that come anywhere near that. "Tear The Top", "Lady´s Baby", "Come On In", "Merry-Go-Round", they´re all kind of disappointing.

    Having said that, though, let´s not forget what a terrific keyboard player he is too. He "wrote" and played that piano lick on "Daydream Believer", which you can´t cover the song without doing, and his playing on Headquarters in general (and "Shades of Grey" in particular) is fabulous. Not flashy, but always exactly what´s needed.
     
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  11. sotet

    sotet New Member

    Location:
    SE
    What few songs that were written by Tork during his Monkees years were wonderful. His battle with alcoholism is tragic, but unfortunately, rather common. I have heard some of his solo work (those recordings) from the 1970s (Higher and Higher) etc, but I don't care for them that much. Peter is much better as a musician, playing in the band as he wanted all along.

    I enjoy reading about Peter's background: being from a very educated background, dropping out of Carleton college twice, being a francophone, being versatile with many instruments, moving around a whole lot as a youngster, being a teacher for 2 years, being sensitive, being very frank about his own bouts with alcoholism (The 3 Monkees on Sally Jessy in 1987 showed Tork with lots of humor)

    The only thing I have not enjoyed with Tork lately is his commentary on the recent Monkees DVDs, he comes across as bitter, in my opinion.

    Thanks for this interesting thread.
     
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