Rubellan Remasters Hype/Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Erick Haight, May 11, 2022.

  1. Scott Davies

    Scott Davies Forum Resident

    Too late!

    My primary contact is the top of the food chain, and one of those who has blown off 95% of my infrequent messages over the years, and is the one who said the TPE issue was going to be handled this past week, and is the one often out of the office. I did once send a message about their subordinate who was being snappy and problematic, and the response was brief and clearly not interested, and I'm sure it was never brought up to the person. So yeah, the top doesn't always mean getting things done, sometimes it just shows those underneath how to respond (or not respond to, as in this case) to your clients. I've learned from my 'corporate' years that company behavior is often learned at the top and trickles down. So if the top is considerate and believes in customer relations, it resonates down. If the top chooses to ignore most messages and dismiss concerns, that has also shown to trickle down.
     
  2. Scott Davies

    Scott Davies Forum Resident

    Thank you. If the manufacturer tries to be difficult, I will gladly send him a link to these thread pages.
     
    longdist01 and patient_ot like this.
  3. patient_ot

    patient_ot Senior Member

    Location:
    USA
    The problem with off-center records is that the problem becomes worse as you reach the end of a side.

    Off-center can happen for a variety of reasons. Stampers can be punched off-center but that is rare as long as the plant has basic procedures in place when doing metalwork.

    Another more common reason is stampers are not properly centered when installed on the presses. Frequently this happens when stampers are changed from one job to another.

    Another way is the stamper collar splits during the pressing process, causing the stamper to shift. Once it happens the rest of the run after the split will be off.
     
  4. Platterpus

    Platterpus Senior Member

    Just like Harrison Ford said for his character (Allie Fox) in the hardware store for the movie, The Mosquito Coast, "I just work here, that's the attitude."
     
    longdist01 likes this.
  5. JBozzioHam

    JBozzioHam Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Las Huevos
    RUTH is not her best song, I'm not into the show or Netflix at all, but nice to see the revival of 80's bands. Once the masses hear 80's stuff, the will realize the music today is mostly garbage.

    I hope your health gets better Scott, maybe the 80s' and CD revival will revitalize your Label eventually.
     
    jamesc, longdist01 and Platterpus like this.
  6. Pavol Stromcek

    Pavol Stromcek Senior Member

    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    That's so funny - as someone who was buying lots of new vinyl throughout the 80s, in my experience vinyl in the 80s was significantly better than over the past 12 or so years. I have encountered way, way, way more problems in the past decade with LPs that have been badly (or even mildly) warped, off center, and noisy than in the 80s. While there is quite a bit of circumstantial evidence to suggest that quality control should be worse nowadays (e.g., fewer pressing plants, aging equipment and fewer people who know how to service it), maybe it really is just luck of the draw, and I happened to have better luck in the 80s?
     
  7. Dazbuff

    Dazbuff Forum Resident

    Hey Scott,
    Maybe go back to your original passion, making a better cd for your fans. Seems to me although it’s bigger covers and colored vinyl are nice, the overall product sound suffers, esp when so many factors can mess it up. I remember back in your faq column a while back when you told customers you only were focused on cds, for the time being.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2022
    ispace and Theacademyinperil like this.
  8. SJP

    SJP Forum Resident

    Location:
    Anaheim
    I disagree, as long as Scott's heart continues to be in vinyl. I like both CDs & vinyl and the Rubellan vinyl issues have been a ton of fun. They sound nice overall and are great to look at which makes them worthwhile additions to any vinyl collection. Looking forward to the corrected Missing Persons LP and whatever vinyl might come down the road (with a strong nod to Split Enz).
     
  9. Tom H

    Tom H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    I am not a vinyl guy - I sold my collection in the late 80's to convert to CD. But that tonearm is moving way too much in your videos for these to pass QC. You are not being picky or perfectionist. That's got to be fixed, period. Whoever pressed that should be begging you to send it back so they can fix it.
     
    patient_ot, longdist01 and SJP like this.
  10. JBozzioHam

    JBozzioHam Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Las Huevos
    Imagine all 3 Altered Images albums on Colored Vinyl remastered by Scott, esp Pinky Blue on Pink/Blue swirl vinyl

    Bite on clear black/grey
    Happy Birthday in Confetti!
     
    Pavol Stromcek and SJP like this.
  11. Dazbuff

    Dazbuff Forum Resident

    SJP,
    I understand what your saying, but if too many more errors occur, Scott may hang it up for good. And while the license thing happened on the cd end (it wasn’t a stamping issue, a center issue or a warping issue, so the sound quality wasn’t effected), most of the other problems are vinyl related. Every cd I have received from Scott has been amazing.
     
    ispace likes this.
  12. Slim Pickins

    Slim Pickins Forum Resident

    Way off.
     
    patient_ot and longdist01 like this.
  13. SJP

    SJP Forum Resident

    Location:
    Anaheim
    I will respectfully disagree and offer my support for both CD and vinyl Rubellan issues. Scott will be the one to judge his staying power. With our collective support across both formats, I think we all can agree that we are voting with our wallets for him to stay in the game.

    Regardless, we are witnessing two consecutive major issues, one in CD land and the other vinyl, which would test the resolve of any small business.
     
  14. Tom H

    Tom H Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    IMO Scott should do what is best for his business. Whether it is CD or vinyl or both. But two recent vinyl jobs were unacceptable due to manufacturing problems. The CD problem had nothing to do with the format.
     
  15. Scott Davies

    Scott Davies Forum Resident

    Personally, I'd like to keep vinyl in the mix of my catalog, but I can't keep being put in situations like this. I had the worst time trying to get to sleep last night, racing mind and uncertainties. If I do ever get another vinyl clearance, I'm going to try another manufacturer, for sure. It's a shame because I've had two sales guys at Precision, both of whom have been really good guys and I had built relationships with them. I've even had a few good phone calls with the most recent rep, but these aren't the people controlling the presses so they suffer the loss of clients because of others. Your reputation is built by the quality you provide, and I cannot let Precision's lack of quality bleed over into customers hesitating to buy my vinyl reissues because of being burned in the past.

    Since my first vinyl clearance, I wanted to use Gotta Groove Records in Cleveland. They are very local to me and I wanted to give them the business. Plus, they have a good reputation. They've been very friendly during correspondences, but their turn time has always been longer than I wanted, so I looked elsewhere. But with the delays caused by rejections and re-doing jobs, the time to get a quality product in hand would likely even out. Part of the reason I initially liked Precision was because they (allegedly) do Direct Metal Mastering, which I've liked from the 80's. One benefit of DMM is that you are not supposed to hear any bleed through of the music before the song actually starts, which can happen with lacquer cutting. But I've also read that Precision/GZ will occasionally farm out their mastering to lacquer cutters, and I believe it. If you listen to the Missing Persons album (mainly side 1), you can clearly hear several rotations of bleed through before the music starts. My Divinyls LP is the same way. I don't believe those were DMM cuts.

    As far as 80's vinyl vs modern vinyl, I also feel the opposite. I found 80's vinyl generally problem free, even in the later 80's when people say a lot of it was recycled. I have seen UK pressings where one side is very off center, and I used to carve out the holes so I could center it on the platter, which should never have to be done. But with US pressings, I can't say I recall any off center pressings, or at least none to such a degree even approaching my current issue.
     
  16. Slim Pickins

    Slim Pickins Forum Resident

    I think first time buyers will eat up the bad cost, but you know how that will end up biting your reputation in the ass. Destroy the bad pressings.
     
  17. Slim Pickins

    Slim Pickins Forum Resident

    We're seeing more CD pressing issues as well. I'm curious what these compact cassettes are going to sound like in a decade.
     
  18. patient_ot

    patient_ot Senior Member

    Location:
    USA
    A friend of mine had a record done at Precision. The vast majority of their jobs are DMM which is cut and plated at GZ in the Czech Republic. I would guess that they ship mother plates to Precision, or maybe even sets of stampers. I'm not sure offhand about Precision's metal plating facilities. My understanding is that Precision can do lacquers but they prefer not to do them and would only do them if the client rejected a DMM cut. GZ cuts have a very particular look to them especially at the runout groove, so it should be easy to tell if it is a DMM cut.

    Re: 80s UK pressings, I have had some that were not good as far as centering. One of the worst offenders was the plant Damont. A lot of stuff was pressed there in the UK and they weren't the best at keeping records centered. Many records for the UK market in the 80s were actually pressed elsewhere - such as plants in Germany or France.

    I think using a plant that is more local to you is a good idea. At the very least you can communicate more directly before issues arise, let them know your expectations, and avoid shipping charges for records if you can pick them up yourself.
     
  19. JJAM

    JJAM Forum Resident

    Location:
    South East
    I've heard worse - but not much worse. That's unlistenable to me.
     
    Scott Davies likes this.
  20. jamesc

    jamesc Senior Member

    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Agreed 100%. I very rarely had issues with vinyl in the 80s which shouldn't be surprising since the pressing plants had been refining the process for decades. Now, you go on Discogs and 90% of the comments are about pressing quality of current vinyl.

    I don't buy modern vinyl very often but did grab a couple of RR's releases and will probably buy some more, especially if Scott has any slow moving titles.
     
    Pavol Stromcek likes this.
  21. eclecticfiend

    eclecticfiend wavy air aficionado

    Location:
    New Orleans
    Scott could press a field recording of a Long John Silvers bathroom on vinyl and I’d probably buy it at this point. If it hits his store, it’s gonna be of ridiculously high quality, as his last few posts have proven.

    To the people who believe that releasing the exact same digital master to a digital and analogue format is silly and any benefits of the analogue would be voodoo nonsense, I have to say I agree. However…when dealing with art, sometimes voodoo nonsense simply makes sense, or at least is fun.
    For example, the original cd for the (partially?) digitally recorded Abba The Visitors sounds flat, clean and excellent, barely different from the OP vinyl. But I’d be lying if I said the vinyl doesn’t have a punch to it that I prefer. Film is the same as audio in this sense. I saw 2 screenings of The Social Network (shot with a 4.5k Red and mastered in 2k) years ago, one in a 4k theater and the other a 35mm print of that 2k master. While it looked the same 80% of the time I swear the 35mm somewhat “corrected” the wonky motion blur of the Red for a few scenes. But then again, I’m sure there’d be people who saw both and all they’d notice is some annoying dust and scratches on the 35.
    One of the fun and unique elements of collecting music is you have that choice at home. With film it’s near impossible to get and play back a 35mm or even 16mm print, and if you do it’s gonna cost an arm and a leg and your copy will likely be as beat up as any used vinyl. Not that HD or UHD blu ray isn’t perfect as is, but it’s the only game in town. For music, you can get a pristine analogue copy of your favorite albums for anywhere from 10 to 200 bucks most of the time.
    The digi vs analogue debate is a fun subject to be an agnostic on. When dealing with RR, you should consider being agnostic too. Comparing his Boingo pressings to the CDs, there’s barely any of that analogue coloring I was just rambling about, but in a very good way. They’re crisp and tight sounding, almost like a Bernie Grundman. But as someone who’s ears are a tad sensitive to digi high end, I find them slightly more crankable. His CDs are analogue lover friendly and his vinyl is digi lover friendly imho.

    Concerning 80s vinyl, I agree that there’s way more catastrophic failures in modern pressings, without a doubt. More off center pressings, abnormally loud cracks, skips, crappy mastering, etc. I joke with my music buddy that you can only sound as good as 80s vinyl, never better. But just to play Devil’s advocate, I only own a single 80s pressing (many of which I bought unopened or “““NM”””) as dead quiet as my RRs or the other bests of my modern releases, the quiet 80s record being a Japan ELO Secret Messages. I’m sure other Japan and also the Quiex pressings are, from what others here have said. Just from my experience a lot of 70s and 80s pressings can have quite the gnarly noise floor, which is only a problem during quiet passages and sparse mixes.

    Anyways, got the super secret prize for my *ahem* DONATION and it’s sounding great. Too bad they didn’t let you finish the other.
     
  22. Bob C

    Bob C Forum Resident

    Location:
    So Cal
    Now accepting donations? Maybe I missed something...
     
  23. eclecticfiend

    eclecticfiend wavy air aficionado

    Location:
    New Orleans
    This one.
     
    longdist01 and Bob C like this.
  24. veloso2

    veloso2 Forum Resident

    no way these album sucks, but each taste are different! just love TPE and prefer them to undertones!!
     
  25. Scott Davies

    Scott Davies Forum Resident

    All of my test pressings come from the Czech Republic, which is where all the cutting and plating is done. I believe Precision is purely a manufacturing facility. I've wondered if the fact that stampers are made overseas and shipped to Canada could be the reason those quirks end up in the final pressings that were not in the test pressings, or if it's just careless handling of the parts on either end. Either way, two nights of randomly popping awake feeling like I'm in a nightmare is not what I signed up for. I hate loose ends and until this is rectified I'm going to feel unsettled.

    I started sending a few of the Oingo Boingo LP pre-orders out today and will concentrate on those orders that don't include the Missing Persons LP for now while I wait to see what the next step is and how long. I've been assured the issue is expedited and that I should hear something this afternoon, as in if their "quality" department is satisfied with reviewing their catalog copies of the LP for the error or if they need me to ship a batch back to them for review. Since I've found it on every copy from every box I've sampled, they should have no problem seeing it on their end with what they have on hand. I'll find out later today.
     

Share This Page

molar-endocrine