Slade & Glam Rock...

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by siebrand, Feb 12, 2019.

  1. The Lone Cadaver

    The Lone Cadaver Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bronx
    Ya'll are forgetting the best one.
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  2. dvfmlfc

    dvfmlfc Scouse, Socialist and by the Seafront

    Location:
    Liverpool
    Slade were massive in the UK - another self-contained band with a great songwriting ethos, and a stand-out image. They weren't exclusively Glam Rock, but they embraced the era. Like a lot of UK pop-rock acts of the early 1970s, they meant nothing in America, but by god did they try??? Cheap Trick owe their name to Slade, and Kiss wouldn't have existed without them. Glam Rock in America was a different beast to what was happening in Britain.
     
  3. misterdecibel

    misterdecibel Bulbous Also Tapered


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  4. Troy4

    Troy4 Forum Resident

    I went to see this excellent movie back in the day at the Victoria Odeon London.
    It has some great one liners in it.
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    Fun times they had touring in the back of a van.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2019
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  5. redfloatboat

    redfloatboat Forum Resident

    I was born in '59 and Slade were the first band i got into in a serious way, around '71 or '72. For a long time i was buying every single they released.
    Slade Alive! was the first lp i ever owned.[mum had to buy it plus all the singles of course!] It's the only live album i've ever liked tbh.
    I even had a denim jacket that i painted with silver paint, it never properly dried out!
    Slade in Flame was the first lp of theirs that disappointed me, lost interest in them gradually. I still have 4 of their albums and still play them.
    Years later i got into Play It Loud and this is my favourite album of Slade.
    I think if they hadn't of worn such ridiculous clothing they would've been taken more seriously in the America and by many critics. Plus Daves' stupid haircut didn't help!
    Holder/Lea were really talented songwriters and found it so easy to write hooks.
    Noddy would of got bored in AC/DC after a while, unless he'd of taken them in a slightly different direction? The Young brothers were fans of Slade.
    Favourite song of theirs is Take Me Ba'k 'Ome. I really love their cover of the Janis Joplin song Move Over too.

    I had singles by Wizzard, Gary Glitter, Alice Cooper, Slade, T.Rex, Bowie, Alvin Stardust, The Sweet. Never considered Mott or Queen as glam as i became aware of those two just a little later than the rest. As for Roxy, no way were they glam, there's more to glam than Eno dressing up.

    The American version of glam was boring and the songs were no where near as good, shouldn't be associated at all with the British Glam Rock scene.
     
  6. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
  7. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    Bryan Ferry had the glamour of classic Hollywood.
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  8. Ditmasduke

    Ditmasduke Forum Resident

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    I’m from New Jersey and just like another poster, this style was called “glitter rock” out here. Harlow were the biggest glitter act here in Jersey, they’d pull in about 500 hard partying fans whenever they’d play. They started playing out as early as ‘71 under the name Satan. Around ‘74 they became Harlow.

    Only other glitter band I recalled here in Jersey before them was called Trix but they really just dressed the part, their music was a little light.
     
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  9. Javed Jafri

    Javed Jafri Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Was listening to an online radio station as I read this thread and what come on but this song which I guess was a Canadian contribution to glitter rock. The Wackers may also qualify somewhat to that label.

     
  10. klockwerk

    klockwerk Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ohio USA
    I love Slade. Mama We're All Crazy Now got lots of radio airplay.
     
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  11. quarl23

    quarl23 Queen Crimson

    Location:
    Berkeley, CA
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    Glam is more than just Brian Eno "dressing up" but he did it well. If Eno in Roxy Music is the standard for "glam" then few of these bands mentioned would qualify. I would suggest glam is both an aesthetic and a musical genre which seems broadly defined. T. Rex started as an experimental folk band and morphed in to pop although Marc Bolan did dress the part. David Bowie was glam for Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, Pin*Ups. but his music isn't that narrowly categorized. Mott is often mentioned as glam but that has more to do with their association with Bowie than their music or their stage personae. And I there is no American glam, save Lou Reed, briefly and the Dolls notwithstanding. And Alice Cooper is just good old rock and roll with a theatrical stage performance. Todd Haynes' Velvet Goldmine is not a documentary but it makes a good argument for the genre.
     
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  12. dpv2008

    dpv2008 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ukraine
    I was born in '59 too. I began to listening to rock music after hearing "Coz I Luv You", in 1973. There were no SP at the black market in the USSR, LP only. That why many Soviet fans of Slade did not know about "Merry Xmas Everybody".
     
  13. siebrand

    siebrand Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Italy
     
  14. Orthogonian Blues

    Orthogonian Blues Forum Resident

    Location:
    London, UK
    Nowadays, when people think of Slade, they think of Dave Hill's teeth or 'silly old brummie cuddly uncle Noddy'.

    But, like Ace Frehely, I bet Dave Hill inspired thousands of kids to pick up a guitar.

    And by god, Noddy could sing. Check out their cover of Janis' 'Move Over'.
     
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  15. Randoms

    Randoms Aerie Faerie Nonsense

    Location:
    UK
    I think for people to get the "fashion" that accompanied Glam, you have to understand that the UK was in a bit of a mess with strikes, three day weeks and power cuts - Glam helped brighten things up.

    It is a shame that the images of Slade and Sweet seem to put off people from what is some excellent music, with a few early bubblegum singles thrown in by Sweet.

    From very early Sweet wrote all of their B-Side, and these probably came as a complete shock to those expecting Co-Co....

    Slade wrote their own material, and for a few years in the UK charts they were unstoppable and live they were a force to be reckoned with. Noddy was often voted best male singer, Don one of the hardest hitting drummers around, Jim Lea a brilliant musician and the twin guitars of Dave and Noddy very good and very loud!




    Sweet were also excellent musicians, the late Mick Tucker an outstanding drummer.

    More than anything, this music simply put a smile on my face.

    Who cares if Glam was "cool", it was fantastic and Slade rocked louder and longer than most.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019
  16. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    The revisionism is happening so quickly that it's impossible to keep up with it.
     
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  17. Randoms

    Randoms Aerie Faerie Nonsense

    Location:
    UK
    Not all of their A-sides!

     
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  18. siebrand

    siebrand Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Italy
    RIGHT...
    That was so 50 years ago.
    And still ... a smile appears when I hear them.
    OK... now I listen ofter to Jazz and other kind of pop/rock.
    But... could they play!
     
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  19. Randoms

    Randoms Aerie Faerie Nonsense

    Location:
    UK
    If I've had a bad day at work, I often put on something like Slade, Sweet, T. Rex, in the car and yes, 45+ years later, this music will quickly put a smile on my face.

    I like most music, but have never lost my love of Glam Rock.
     
  20. Cameron.39

    Cameron.39 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nottingham, UK
    I think the Sweet are one of the most underrated British bands ever. They were all superbly talented musicians, coupled with the showmanship of Brian Connolly. They were musically ahead of everyone else on the Glam scene, stifled by the "hit factory" that Chinn/Chapman who kept them in the charts but bubbling away behind the scenes was a superb writing team in Connolly/Priest/Scott/Tucker. This is the kind of thing they were writing on their own...

     
  21. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    Fantastic band and I love this, but a songwriting duo that gave them Blockbuster, The Ballroom Blitz, Hell Raiser, Teenage Rampage and The Six Teens can hardly be accused of stifling them. They were fine songwriters, but never as good as those, though Set Me Free, The Lies In Your Eyes, Fox On The Run and more are fantastic self written songs. I agree about them being very underrated.
     
  22. Randoms

    Randoms Aerie Faerie Nonsense

    Location:
    UK
    Yes, those later Chinnichap penned songs are really good and written specifically for Sweet instead of the generic early bubblegum material (which is still fun!).

    Action was another excellent band written single - 1975 and not so glam!

     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2019
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  23. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    I've read that they wrote Dyna-mite for the Sweet but they turned it down. Mud recorded it and had a huge hit and from then on Chinn / Chapman prioritised Mud. I don't like all of Mud's records but that's a great one.
     
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  24. dvfmlfc

    dvfmlfc Scouse, Socialist and by the Seafront

    Location:
    Liverpool
    Like Slade, Sweet weren't Glam Rock, they just went along with the image (starting with "Wig Wam Bam") to see what would happen. Between the years of 1970-1974, it did them no harm but any act associated with the Glam era in the UK would find success in the second-half of the 70s elusive. Going from a seemingly novelty bubblegum act to a serious rock band was always going to be tricky going.
     
  25. Randoms

    Randoms Aerie Faerie Nonsense

    Location:
    UK
    What revisionism?
     
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