Songs That Seemingly Have No Precedent

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by stanleynohj, May 13, 2022.

  1. Spaghettiows

    Spaghettiows Forum Resident

    Location:
    Silver Creek, NY
    You are right. I've heard it described before as if an alien spaceship had landed in 1978, and Eddie appeared from the spaceship playing this sound that had never, in its' totality, been heard before by humans.

    Many have copied it since, and some did rudimentary tapping before, but nobody did anything like "Eruption" prior to Eddie in any way close to how Eddie Van Halen did it.
     
  2. walrusz

    walrusz Forum Resident

    The Doors
    The End
     
    DrJ likes this.
  3. bagofsoup

    bagofsoup Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York
    Everybody Wants to Rule The World. I can’t think of another song that sounds like it.
     
    Mark L. likes this.
  4. walrusz

    walrusz Forum Resident

    The Knack
    My Sharona
     
    Mark L. likes this.
  5. mbd40

    mbd40 Steely Dan Fan

    Location:
    Hope, Ar
    What else sounded like this in 1971? I think this is the first song to have a new wave sound.

     
  6. DrJ

    DrJ Senior Member

    Location:
    Davis, CA, USA
    The Spangle Maker is definitely one

     
    Last edited: May 14, 2022
    veloso2 and spindly like this.
  7. Also, "The Murder Mystery"
     
  8. Brian Kelly

    Brian Kelly 1964-73 rock's best decade

    I would say "Tomorrow Never Knows" was the start of getting to songs like "I Am The Walrus" for the Beatles.
     
  9. DrJ

    DrJ Senior Member

    Location:
    Davis, CA, USA
    I remember hearing this one on the old MTV program 120 Minutes and thinking it felt like something more or less completely new:



    Lush certainly didn’t invent shoegaze or whatever box you want to categorize them in but this song, released in 1990 (a year ahead of My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless album another classic I’m that general realm), really transcends all such labels and is just totally out of left field (and amazing). They had a few killer tracks approaching that level - Scarlet for example - but none quite as unique as this one.
     
    veloso2 likes this.
  10. Brian Kelly

    Brian Kelly 1964-73 rock's best decade

    Loreena McKennitt's "Mummer's Dance" being a top 40 hit certainly came out of nowhere.
     
    Jarleboy likes this.
  11. Jon-A

    Jon-A Forum Resident

    Location:
    Madison, WI
    Highly anecdotal, and perhaps more indicative of my own limited frame of reference, but recordings that seemed unique to me when I first encountered them: Are You Experienced, Lady Madonna, Trout Mask Replica, Hot Rats, Glad All Over, Stand Up, Dirty Mind, My War, Ramones, This Year's Model, B-52s...
     
  12. DrJ

    DrJ Senior Member

    Location:
    Davis, CA, USA
    One more then I will stop - Throwing Muses Call Me also struck me as very much it’s own thing. I sat there with my jaw on the floor after spinning it the first time - after happening across a NM used copy of the LP shortly after it had been released and buying it purely to explore something new, with no preknowledge about what I would hear - just because a) it was a UK import on 4AD and b) like so many releases on that label the packaging was incredible. It quickly became a favorite. Staggeringly brilliant (and they never did anything else to touch this debut album in my opinion).

    Who else was writing and playing this kind of stuff in 1986???

     
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  13. JSUB

    JSUB Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    The first wide release of stuff in the No Wave genre - No New York lp
     
  14. DeafDumbAndBlindKid

    DeafDumbAndBlindKid Forum Resident

    Location:
    Stranded in Iowa
    Metal Machine Music A-4

    The first time I played the vinyl and it hit the locked groove...well, there's certainly no precedent for that I said to myself.
     
  15. Rich-n-Roll

    Rich-n-Roll Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington State
    Cat food- King Crimson
     
    Dalziel53 likes this.
  16. Zappateer

    Zappateer Forum Resident

    That’s Alright Mama - Elvis Presley
     
  17. Joy-of-radio

    Joy-of-radio Forum Resident

    Location:
    Central ME
    This record by Chuck Holden titled The Cave released in 1956 is really out there!
     
    Brian Doherty likes this.
  18. zen

    zen Senior Member

    IIRC, Joseph Haydn heard Beethoven's 5th during a rehearsal and the compelling energy of the entire first movement
    (being derived from only a short opening motive of 4 notes), scared him.

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Joy-of-radio

    Joy-of-radio Forum Resident

    Location:
    Central ME
    Released as a single in 1967, this song, if one may call it such, has no precedent in terms of strangeness especially part II!
    Googy & Joe's Workshop To Fernanda With Luv Part I
     
  20. Joy-of-radio

    Joy-of-radio Forum Resident

    Location:
    Central ME
    Googy & Joe's Workshop To Fernanda With Luv Part II
     
  21. Joy-of-radio

    Joy-of-radio Forum Resident

    Location:
    Central ME
    Rosemary Clooney Come on-a My House released in 1951. When I first heard this, I could scarcely believe my ears! A harpsichord doing a rock 'n' roll?!
     
    Patanoia, sixtiesstereo and Jarleboy like this.
  22. UnderTheFloorboards'66

    UnderTheFloorboards'66 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    John Lennon - Mother

    Very honest, emotional, and raw, especially for an artist of his stature. It wasn't until a few years later that you get a handful of artists that are that honest about their drug, family, money troubles etc.
     
  23. central616

    central616 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rosario
    Yes.
     
  24. The Dark Elf

    The Dark Elf Curmudgeonly Wordwraith

    Location:
    Michigan
    Fleetwood Mac's "Oh Well", Parts 1 and 2. An immensely entertaining blues song shuffling between Delta acoustics and monstrous electric riffs, paired with what is perhaps the greatest Spaghetti Western composition that never made it to a Lee Van Cleef/Clint Eastwood soundtrack. Peter Green's genius was tragically cut short at the pinnacle of his career. That "The Green Manalishi" was his titanic final song with Mac just shows how sad his mental decline cut off what could have been.
     
    Dalziel53 and CliffL like this.

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