The greatest consumer cassette tape deck ever produced?*

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Cowboy Kim, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Rachael Bee

    Rachael Bee Miembra muy loca

    If you're only gonna listen to prerecorded tapes, I would not spend much on a deck. I mostly made my own tapes but the few prerecorded tapes I had didn't benefit much from the way above average decks I had. They might have sounded even worse on a mediocre deck. I would suggest looking for a single well deck under the presumption that most of the double decks have one or two (both) lousy tape mechanisms. Your odds of getting one good mechanisms are likely better with a single well deck. You don't need a 3 head deck. Their advantages are strictly for recording. If you find a deck with dual capstans (tape rollers), it will probably give you better playback and less chance of a tape fouling during playback.
     
  2. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    In 1971. Modern 3 head cassette decks have better frequency response and signal to noise ratio. No Dolby C or S on this. Too old for that. The Dragon was 20 - 22 000 hz +-3 db. The old 1000 couldn't achieve those specs. I suppose the electronics could be superior. And modern 3 head Naks have the automatic azimuth adjustment. That means every tape will sound just as good as if you were playing it back on the deck it was recorded on. Nah! Tape technology was primitive back in 1971. The Nak 1000 is famous for one reason only: It was the first cassette deck ever to achieve 20 - 20 000 hz +-3 db with Type 2 tape. But any good 3 head machine can pull that off. And every VHS / Beta / S-VHS HI-FI VCR did it in it's sleep.

    But quite and achievement for 1971.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019 at 11:35 PM
  3. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    But metal tapes were not available until the 1980's ...
     
  4. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    We still have two at the studio. Uncle Jack used to make copies of the master with them. He purchased two Dragons back in the late 80's. He claims his Metal cassette copies are better than the high definition files available for download.
    Of some albums out now.

    I would take this claim with a grain of salt.....
     
  5. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    Incorrect. My Nak 581 (made in 1979) had settings for Metal tape. But I think you are close. I didn't get the unit until 1980 but it had a 1979 year sticker on it. And it came with me 15 min. Metal tape. And I afraid that trumps anything Wikimedia might say on the subject.
     
  6. john morris

    john morris Everybody's Favorite Quadron

    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    You are right. My mistake of course. Full flat frequency response with Type 2 which is pretty good for 1990 let alone 1971.
     
  7. Lownotes

    Lownotes Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denver, CO
    I had an Aiwa for years and it worked and sounded great.

    But it's hard to beat the auto-azimuth adjustment of my Dragon. :)
     
    macster likes this.
  8. XiaoDe

    XiaoDe Member

    Location:
    Germany
    Thanks a lot for the feedback. Then I might overthink my approach and look into other options, maybe start with recording - everything I have on tape is also available digitally or I even have it stored as FLAC. If I read between your lines and record that on tape with a proper machine, sound quality should be much better?

    Kind regards
     
  9. jusbe

    jusbe Modern Melomaniac

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    In your shoes, I'd look for a NAD deck from the 80s. Two or three heads. Simple looking. Unfeasibly good sound. 6325, 6340 or, if you can, 6300. Even the 616 dual deck is built well in a stealthy way (decent transports).
     

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