The Kinks - Album by Album (song by song)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by mark winstanley, Apr 4, 2021.

  1. Fischman

    Fischman RockMonster, ClassicalMaster, and JazzMeister

    Location:
    New Mexico
    Right.... but you said there were no direct flights.... and you talked f diverting around the jetstream. That's where the extra distance comes from by your accounting.

    Oh, and by the way, the diverting around the Jetstream was a red herring anyway. Flights avoid the Jetstream only when flying east to west. When flying west to east, catching the Jetstream gives powerful tailwind, allowing for both increased speed and reduced fuel consumption.
     
  2. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    I can relate to every word Mark.
     
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  3. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    We have both lyric versions on my 1998 CD with bonus tracks so interesting that as assume neither were specifically BBC recordings from the ground up?
     
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  4. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Didn't a very similar thing soon happen again with the Apeman overdub?
     
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  5. FJFP

    FJFP Host for the 'Mixology' Mix Differences Podcast

    Correct - they changed the mono mix for the single so the BBC would play it.
     
  6. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Neither of the versions on the 1998 CD are BBC recordings, and in fact even the BBC session version is just the studio version with a few tweaks. The importance of the lyric change with regards to the BBC is that if the ‘product placement’ lyric wasn’t replaced, the BBC (supposed to be a non commercial organisation) weren’t going to play the record. This was particularly important in 1970, which was between the downfall of the UK pirate stations and the establishment of major UK commercial stations like Capital later in the decade, so getting on the BBC was absolutely crucial to having a UK hit in that timeframe.
     
  7. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Sunny Afternoon 1966
    French EP
    [​IMG]

    Sunny Afternoon

    I am late to the party, so many great points have been made and our protagonist likely has no outdoor furniture to sit on by now either!

    Sunny Afternoon is of course not only classic Kinks but one of their greatest tracks and well really a rock standard if you will.
    I can't tell you exactly when I first heard it but i do know that i was immediately stunned and knew this sounded incredibly special and must be of huge renown and import.
    I was moved to learn it on guitar and sing it (i don't even sing!) playing as many parts as i could as unnacompanied.
    The chromatic run was sublime and finding ways to play it with moving chord shapes just made me more in awe of Ray's genius.
    (Didn't Talmy insist Nicky Hopkins sit down, watch and copy Ray's untutored playing on the introductory line?)
    The melody, progression and arrangement is gorgeous and the music hall feel throughout is sublime.
    I blame Ray that I felt compelled to attempt the vocal (and playing) with so much concentration and precision that I would often go after a chorus, bridge or verse into the wrong section (Laughs!)
    Again I can't quite rationalise how Ray made the giant leap and came up with this glorious amalgamation aside from grappling with a few genres of influence as many here have done already.
    And yes I have never felt any negative feeling to the (once) wealthy man in the song just some relatability or perhaps empathy to his plight.

    N.b. I found an original '66 piece of sheet music and was astounded to find it was accurate!
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2021
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  8. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    I'm Not Like Everybody Else

    Love it, it's like punk pre-punk!
    A little surprised Ray didn't sing it but Dave nails it with his youth, voice & personality to deliver his best and most convincing vocal to date.
    Great simple guitar riff that drives the point home and a wonderful live cut from To The Bone which provides another very welcome angle to this killer B!
    I really identified closely with it despite being about 30 when first hearing it and playing it today 20+ years later it still can transport me if I let it.
    I feel it's simplicity is no personal deterent for me to it's enjoyment (nor my age) as I still relate to not wanting to be pigeonholed or manipulated through assumption or misunderstanding.
     
  9. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    I agree with all the comments regarding the songs greatness and classic status so not much point in echoing those posts. It's a great singalong pub song. There was a time in pubs when if a certain song came on the jukebox most of the punters would join in and sing along with the chorus. Nowadays if you did that you would very likely find yourself being ejected.

    It's also unique in that it was the only Kinks single that knocked the Beatles (Paperback Writer) off the number one spot. And, of course, was number 1 when England won the World Cup. I'm always reminded of Sitting By The Riverside when I listen to Sunny Afternoon.
     
  10. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Yes I was aware of all this except couldn't recall the BBC were playing a mono single and not an otherwise exclusive performance as had often been the case.
    So is either version on the official reissue CD from the single?
     
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  11. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    More ironic than sarcastic.

    Most people would be more than happy to be sipping a cool beer in a stately home on a sunny day but this guy is complaining!

    It all adds to the slightly comic effect of the situation.
     
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  12. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    PYE considered Sunny Afternoon a big enough hit to grant it an album title for their el-cheapo subsidary label Marble Arch records. Our heroes are photographed sitting on a colourful Buick (looks like a sports car) with a cloudless sky (sunny afternoon) in the background.

    I think there were only three such records - Lola, Sunny Afternoon and Well Respected Kinks. My introduction to the Kinks was the Lola Marble Arch album a few years later. Will have more to say about that when we get there. It was the only one I bought in that series although I did buy all of the Golden Hour records. No matter how much the dial was turned up I could never get those GH albums to go loud. Years later I discovered that, due to technical reasons, the longer the LP the more limited the volume is.
     
  13. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    I don't actually own it myself, but it's my understanding that track 14 on the 1998 CD is the mono single with the amended lyric. The BBC would usually play the record versions so the official single version had to be changed to gain sufficient airplay: the exclusive BBC sessions were due to some kind of union rule that a certain amount of music on BBC stations had to be 'live', but as far as I understand it when a record was a hit and in regular rotation it was the regular single version that would mostly be heard on the BBC.

    By 1970 The Kinks (and many other acts) were getting around doing the bulk of this extra session work by sending the BBC only slightly altered performances (say a live vocal over the record) to technically satisfy this 'live' requirement and I think the BBC session version of Lola (available on the Kinks at the BBC set as well as several other reissues) falls into this category.
     
  14. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    I knew I forgot something, the '66 English World Cup win!
     
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  15. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    Both versions on the most recent 2 cd Lola album.
     
  16. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Thanks you for explaining more about the BBC rules circa 1970 and how and what they would play of artists output.
    "Needle Time" was a blessing in disguise, perhaps especially for later generations!
     
  17. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    I wasn't living in England at the time and was young but do remember the excitement the WC in 1966 caused. A friend's dad would be sat in front of the black and white tv chain smoking. That's about all I remember from it and my introduction to soccer.
     
  18. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    So is there three versions then? Album, single and amended lyric?
     
  19. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    that will be new info for me.... my Kinks history is not very strong
     
  20. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    She's My Girl

    I have no idea what thi8s song is, but apparently it is an unreleased song, that appeared on a bootleg.
    If anyone has this, and has the time and/or capability to add it to youtube, and post it on the thread for us, that would be cool

    Listen To Me

    This is another unreleased track, that appeared on a bootleg.
    We have a bouncy kind of track that takes the structure of You Really Got Me and changes the beat accent to give it a slightly different feel.

    I reckon when the listened back to it they realised that it was just too close to You Really Got Me to bother releasing.

     
  21. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    The Kinks ‎– Dedicated Kinks
    Genre: Rock, Pop
    Style: Power Pop
    Year: 1966

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Dedicated Follower Of Fashion
    Till The End Of The Day
    See My Friends
    Set Me Free

    This EP was released in July 1966 in the UK, and in November in the US.....

    These are songs that were all already released, but I guess this was released slightly after the Sunny Afternoon single for folks that weren't really singles buyers.
    There is also a strong chance that all the songs being such high quality, they may have thought that some of the fans picked up with the Sunny Afternoon single, may get this and see that the band had quite a bit more to offer than just the recent single.
     
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  22. LX200GPS

    LX200GPS Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    No love out there for Sunny Afternoon (alternate stereo mix)?
     
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  23. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    Greatest Hits!

    [​IMG]
    Greatest hits album by
    the Kinks
    Released
    12 August 1966
    Genre Rock
    Label Reprise R/RS 6217

    Side 1
    1. "You Really Got Me" released in 1964, reaching #1 in the UK and #7 in the U.S. Also featured on the Kinks' 1965 album Kinks - 2:13
    2. "Tired of Waiting for You" released in 1965, reaching #1 in the UK and #6 in the U.S. Also featured on the Kinks' 1965 album Kinda Kinks - 2:34
    3. "Set Me Free" released in 1965, reaching #9 in the UK and #23 in the U.S. - 2:12
    4. "Something Better Beginning" from the Kinks' 1965 album Kinda Kinks - 2:26
    5. "Who'll Be the Next in Line" released in 1965 in the U.S. as an A-side of a single, reaching #34 there, and as the B-side to the U.K. single "Ev'rybody's Gonna Be Happy" - 2:02
    Side 2
    1. "Till the End of the Day" released in 1965, reaching #8 in the UK and #50 in the U.S. Also featured on the Kinks' 1965 album The Kink Kontroversy - 2:16
    2. "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" released in 1966, reaching #4 in the UK and #36 in the U.S. - 3:05
    3. "A Well Respected Man" released in 1965, reaching #13 in the U.S. - 2:44
    4. "Ev'rybody's Gonna Be Happy" released in the UK as the A-side of a single, reaching #17 there, and as the B-side to the U.S. single "Who'll Be The Next in Line" - 2:16
    5. "All Day and All of the Night" released in 1964, reaching #2 in the UK and #7 in the U.S. - 2:24
    It is interesting that the band release a greatest hits compilation so soon, but we certainly have a good batch of songs on here.

    This album is actually the highest charting Kinks album in the US, reaching number 9 on the US album chart. All the songs were in electronically processed stereo.
    See My Friends wasn't included because although it did well in the UK, reaching number 10 on the UK chart, it didn't do well in the US, reaching only number 111.

    I kind of think that they should have put it on here anyway, because it seems the likelihood of US fans having heard the song would have been fairly small.
    I like the inclusion of Something Better Beginning ... which wasn't even a single, so didn't chart at all, but using the mentality that left off See My Friends, makes it seem like an odd choice.

     
  24. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    We will be looking at that, when we run through the album outtakes.
    We can only look at so much in a day :righton:
     
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  25. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    Well Respected Kinks

    [​IMG]
    Greatest hits album by
    the Kinks
    Released
    2 September 1966
    Genre Rock and roll[1]
    Label Marble Arch MAL 612

    Side one
    All tracks are written by Ray Davies.
    1. "A Well Respected Man" 2:44
    2. "Where Have All the Good Times Gone" 2:53
    3. "Till the End of the Day" 2:20
    4. "Set Me Free" 2:12
    5. "Tired of Waiting for You" 2:34

    Side two

    1. "All Day and All of the Night" 2:24
    2. "I Gotta Move" 2:26
    3. "Don't You Fret" 2:46
    4. "Wait Till the Summer Comes Along" 2:10
    5. "You Really Got Me" 2:14

    This is the first budget priced release in the UK.
    We have a series of popular singles and b-sides ....

    This release is kind of oddly similar to the Greatest Hits release from a month earlier, but we do get a few different tracks on here.... I suppose to some degree it would depend on what the public saw, as to what they may have bought.

    Another really interesting thing about this release is that it spent 35 weeks on the charts, which is the most that any Kinks album had spent on the charts at that point in time.
     
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