The Kinks - Album by Album (song by song)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by mark winstanley, Apr 4, 2021.

  1. Wondergirl

    Wondergirl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    It's very likely I'm misinterpreting. I am not known as an optimist. LOL
     
  2. malco49

    malco49 Forum Resident

    thanks never heard this before! i love the strangers , and of course the kinks! got to see the first ever show by the stranglers here in the states when they played philadelphia!
     
    mark winstanley and Wondergirl like this.
  3. FJFP

    FJFP Host for the 'Mixology' Mix Differences Podcast

    I completely forgot to highlight that incredibly prechorus. So short, so simple, but man, what a build!
     
  4. Fischman

    Fischman RockMonster, ClassicalMaster, and JazzMeister

    Location:
    New Mexico
    All Day and All of the Night
    "Satisfaction" is the most iconic of the early Stones tracks, but through the years I have grown to appreciate "Jumpin' Jack Flash" a bit more. Similar style, but when you listen repeatedly, there's just a little more to it. All Day and All of the Night is The Kinhs Jumpin' Jack Flash. I loved You Really Got Me from day one, and I always will, but this has extra dose of special.

    I Gotta' Move
    Lyrically and stylistically not much here to hold my interest. The key modulation is most welcome and keeps this from being an autoskip.
     
    BZync, Aftermath, Purple Jim and 5 others like this.
  5. Endicott

    Endicott Forum Resident

    All Day And All Of The Night -- An interesting early version of "Destroyer". :D

    The second of the Kinks' unassailable early classics, this one is even rawer and punkier than "You Really Got Me". An absolutely flawless rock and roll record -- strong, aggressive, building up to the Kinks' most explosive outburst yet. A boiling cauldron of sexual energy than only the Animals could match at that point. A big hit on both sides of the Atlantic, and deservedly so. It's unusual for a record this unabashedly primal to make the top ten in the US, but the Kinks pulled it off.

    I never thought "Hello, I Love You" was a particularly egregious ripoff. Popular songs influence and quote each other all the time. The Doors do borrow the Kinks' verse melody, but then take their song in a completely different direction and give it its own feel and atmosphere. There are many more "matched sets" of songs that are similar to each other.

    I Gotta Move -- A good, straightforward (if spare) rocker, and a worthy caddy for its monumental A-side. "I'm going to fill my gap" is the line that stands out to me -- it's unusually personal.
     
    BZync, Jon H., pablo fanques and 14 others like this.
  6. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Thought this would be an appropriate moment to post entertaining clips from the Kinks Feb 1965 appearance on Hullabaloo, a flying first visit to the US where they plugged their first two big hits, but also did a few skits that are of note for featuring brief bits of the members talking (particularly the lesser spotted Quaife and Avory). Also the contrast between the still very Kennedy era vibes of this edition of the show (presented that week by Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello no less!) and the strange mod queerness of The Kinks is very palpable

    The intro, with the group camping it up, which Ray remembers being unsettling to the shows producers:

     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2021
  7. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    mime to All Day And All Of The Night with surfboards and doll-like dancers:

     
  8. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    The Kinks educate the youth of America:

     
  9. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Dave has a somewhat awkward interaction with Frankie and Annette:

     
  10. Wondergirl

    Wondergirl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    All Day and All of the Night - absolutely brilliant. "Leave me never" - what a great and insidious lyric. And I don't play 'air instruments' but I nearly always play the drum when it starts after the initial guitar riff. It's a compulsion. :D
    and didn't know the Stranglers covered it. Well done, but they pretty much left it alone which is fine. there's no improving on it.

    I Gotta Move - I believe I've heard this one before - probably saw the live Shindig version online. and if I didn't, then I felt like I knew it. If I had bought the single and flipped it over to get this as a youngster, I would feel I got my money's worth.

    this is the best pairing we've had in awhile. I'm very satisfied.
     
  11. Wildest cat from montana

    Wildest cat from montana Humble Reader

    Location:
    ontario canada
    'All Day And All Of The Night ' is every bit as demented as 'You Really Got Me '... but even more so.
    What a great song .
    This is where The Kinks start to take off.
     
  12. Wondergirl

    Wondergirl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    this is awkward to watch with that woman just lying there. WTH! surprised Ray didn't kick her.
     
    mark winstanley and ajsmith like this.
  13. Wondergirl

    Wondergirl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    No doubt that Americans had no idea what any of them said, particularly Pete!
     
  14. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Neither can I except for '1000 madrigals'! I love his sarky, aloof grin to the camera at the end though.
     
  15. Zack

    Zack Forum Resident

    Location:
    Easton, MD
    Pete is a wag. He did a little John Lennon imitation there at the end.

    In a BBC interview, the host tried to make a joke about the Kinks growing their hair long, and Pete responded "We're growing our eyebrows long next."
     
  16. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    I also enjoy in the same interview he when suggests that The Kinks might revive Cliff Richard's 'Move It' if they can't come up with original material.
     
  17. Orino

    Orino Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK
    Re The Stranglers cover, I wonder if there's a comparable artist - Dylan? Carole King? For whom so many original songs seem to have reached big(er) audiences as hit single/cover versions by prominent acts. The Stranglers was how I first heard the present song, then there's Pretenders, The Jam, Kirstie MacColl, The Fall.. maybe Bowie.. crikey, I nearly forgot Van Halen!
     
  18. FJFP

    FJFP Host for the 'Mixology' Mix Differences Podcast

    Maybe/maybe not, but Herman’s Hermits and Dandy!
     
  19. Martyj

    Martyj Who dares to wake me from my slumber? -- Mr. Flash

    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    All Day and All the Night

    This follow-up embracing of the band’s new-found stop-and-go/back-and-forth power chord formula is the Rock and Roll equivalent of The Godfather Part II, where the sequel is just a good as the first. Not as earth-shattering, but it built upon the first and depending on your taste could even be considered an improvement.

    I have a sentimental memory around this song. It is the only 1960’s-era Kinks track that I first experienced on a) the radio and b) outside of my own home. When I discovered the band at the time of Sleepwalker every Kinks song was new to my ears and was experienced in my bedroom or dorm room listening to the vinyl LP’s I snapped up as I could afford them from used record shops. This one came to me very early in my Kinks-discovery curve. A friend had the radio on one morning as a group of us were preparing for an outing. I didn’t know what I was hearing but loved it instantly. I can still remember the people I was with and the time of day, and the room of the house, and even the fact the DJ followed this with the Who’s “Squeeze Box.” It’s a bit like the way people remember where they were and what they were doing when they get news of landmark news, such as 9-11 or the death of Princess Di. (By the way, there are only 5 Kinks songs I heard on the radio or TV first. Everything else was experienced first in solitude, normally in my bedroom with headphones on.)

    Regarding the “Hello, I Love You” controversy. Per the Kink’s predilection for Kontradictions, over the years I’ve read in various places that there both was and wasn’t a lawsuit. On a radio interview in the 90’s Ray denied it. He shrugged it off with the explanation everybody borrows from everybody, so they didn’t sue. He knows this all too well as the Ray Davies catalog is rife with examples of bits and pieces taken from other people’s melodies, which I anticipate will be addressed on a song-by-song basis as they come up.

    I’ve heard many Kinks live concerts bootlegs. An interesting thing about ADALTN is how it has been accommodated in their set list. In the late 60’s/early 70’s it seemed rushed through, performed rote, simply to appease expectations. It reminded me of a kid being forced to recite the same Christmas poem written in the 1st grade at every subsequent family Christmas gathering. By the RCA years they were combining it in an abridged medley with YRGM. Punctuating the arrangement with brass horns didn’t do it any favors, either. It took their late 70’s Arista-inspired rebranding as an arena band for this song to be re-invented as a live set-piece, with Dave moving to the fore with guitar-God posturing and extended solos. And then there’s Ray playing to the crowd, leading chants of “Day-O!” It adds about a minute to the song. And, it seems like finally the band enjoyed playing it on stage.
     
  20. Martyj

    Martyj Who dares to wake me from my slumber? -- Mr. Flash

    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    You beat me to it.

    This single line—while not defining the song—makes it specifically about Ray Davies. (For those who don’t know, the back story is this is a reference to the congenital wide gap between Ray’s two front teeth. In the first half-year or so of the band’s success the management felt this was an unsightly disadvantage to his image and encouraged him to “fill his gap” with something—I was never clear with what or how—to cover it up. I’ve only seen one or two pictures where this is evident, and after a short while the effort was discontinued.)

    Nearly every song Ray writes lends itself to cover versions that allow an artist to interpret the lyrics on their own terms. While Ray often writes in personal terms, they are usually around universally relatable themes. Even something as specifically autobiographical as “Come Dancing” connects with the listener for its relatable nostalgia. It’s rare his lyrics are so directly personal. Only his most recent-years solo stuff that I can think of. And while it’s treated almost as a single line throw-away, it does predate (as far as I know) other examples of singer-specific songs of the era, such as Lennon’s “Ballad of John and Yoko.”

    By the way…how does an artist cover this very specific personal reference? Here’s Tom Petty’s version on The Tonight Show, where he simply substitutes the line with the wording from a later verse.

     
  21. Pawnmower

    Pawnmower Senior Member

    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    "All Day and All of the Night" - What more can be said? Lightning striking twice. "You Really Got Me" was so unlike anything else on the singles, album, or EP, that one may cynically determine they went back to that formula for ADAAOTN. They improved upon it and it worked well, though it was kept from the #1 slot in the UK by the Supremes' "Baby Love."

    "I Gotta Move" - Another gotta song. There's something about this track that just doesn't allow me to remember it soon after I've played it. Just now, I played it.. had to take a phone call, and now I can't remember it again. It's probably me, but these takes on repetitive bluesy styles kind of have that effect.
     
  22. palisantrancho

    palisantrancho Forum Resident

    "All Day and All of the Night"- The Kinks are here to say they are not gonna be one hit wonders. This one blows the doors down. What a fantastic guitar sound. I also love the drum sound. Ray is feeling very sure of himself and you can tell in this performance that they all know this will be another massive hit. Nothing much left to say, but this is one of The Kinks most important songs.

    "I Gotta Move"- I don't listen to this one very often and I'm not sure why. Another very solid tune with a nice little guitar lick. They are really starting to sound like one of the most confident bands of the era.
     
  23. Lance LaSalle

    Lance LaSalle Prince of Swollen Sinus

    Wasn't there some 2 Live Crew cover of this? Anyway, that's how I was introduced to it.

    It's obviously a classic and what can I add to what the others have said? It's just so jam packed full of energy and is so creatively arranged. I love that they took their formula and actually made it better, that NEVER works, but here it does. And even more than "You Really Got Me" I hear this in songs like "I CAn't Explain" or "Clash City Rockers" or whatever. Those backing vocals are pretty good too.

    The other one is all right and again makes a good "album track" in my all-original 64 playlist.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2021
  24. Wondergirl

    Wondergirl Forum Resident

    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Didn't know about the Tom Petty cover of the song.
    It's a COOL song, so good pick for him.
     
  25. Steve E.

    Steve E. Doc Wurly and Chief Lathe Troll

    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY, USA
    The album was in the can by mid-August, and there's usually a bit of lag time getting an album pressed and packaged. So the album was released in October, but if the EP and "All Day/Night" single were recorded in late August and September, they were not going to be contenders for the album.

    backtracking: I think Shel Talmy recently claimed on Facebook that "Don't Ever Let Me Go" was recorded for the debut album, which would put its recording date earlier, if true. (This would be in the link I posted a few pages back.) I wonder what IS true? He's allegedly been working from his old notes. If so, starting the record with YRGM (or ending side 1) and ending side 2 with that, would have worked, IMO. Almost like a reprise. They've set the riff against the Peter Gunn theme as counterpoint. It's wonderful.
     

Share This Page

molar-endocrine