The Kinks - Album by Album (song by song)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by mark winstanley, Apr 4, 2021.

  1. All Down The Line

    All Down The Line Senior Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Forced, yes.....forced!
    That was the word I was looking for when I was reading @pyrrhicvictory 's excellent post!
     
  2. Martyj

    Martyj Who dares to wake me from my slumber? -- Mr. Flash

    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    Then it's true what they say: every dog has his day...
     
  3. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    Attitude.

    stereo mix, recorded 20-30 May, 1979 (backing track), early Jun 1979 (vocals) at Power Station, New York (backing track), Blue Rock Studios, New York (vocals)

    You go down the pub
    You wear make up
    And old dads trousers
    Why don't you tidy up
    You talk like a docker but you act like a queer
    You drink champagne then complain it's too dear
    You try so hard not to follow any trends
    Then you cry in your beer and say you've got no friends
    But is it any wonder that you've got no friends
    But it's not the make up
    Or the way you dress
    It's not your appearance, that they all detest
    It's not your manners, that you gotta improve
    ooooo--it's your attitude.

    Chorus
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude

    Take off your head phones
    Hear what's going on
    You can't live in a time zone
    You've gotta move on
    But before you get there
    There's one thing you've gotta do
    Oh change your attitude
    It's your attitude
    It's your attitude

    Chorus
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude

    The '80s are here, I know cuz I'm staring right at them
    But you're still waiting for 1960 to happen

    You might have the illness, but you've got the cure
    You've got the answer, you will endure
    You're the only person that's gonna pull you through
    Ooh, with your attitude

    Chorus
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude

    You gotta learn to be positive, it's your only chance
    You mustn't be so defensive, you gotta join in the dance
    But it isn't your dancing that you've gotta improve
    Ooh, it's your attitude.

    Chorus
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude
    Attitude, Oo Oo Oo
    Your attitude

    It's all in the music
    It's all in your brain
    You've used all the old licks
    Now it's all gotta change.
    Change your attitude
    It's your attitude
    Attitude

    Written by: Ray Davies
    Published by: Davray Music Ltd.

    I've always loved this song. There is nothing subtle about the lyrics, but sometimes that's what's required. I had a good mate that spent all of his time complaining about how hard things were for him, but he had spent most of his life avoiding putting in any effort whatsoever. Everything was always someone else's fault, and sadly it was just a case of he grabbed and clung to this victim mentality that essentially destroyed his life. He became bitter and mean, and after being mates for thirty years, and having spent ten of them trying to persuade him to try a different approach, or however you want to describe it, he turned on me, and I walked away... it was sad, but you can only expose yourself to that kind of toxicity for so long. ..... and it was all about his chosen attitude.

    To some degree with this song, I get the feeling, and I am not sure what specifically makes me feel this.... it seems like Ray may be addressing himself to some degree...
    The first verse only has snippets, and most of it really doesn't seem to point to that theory, but the "You drink champagne then complain it's too dear" line certainly could.
    To some degree "You try so hard not to follow any trends" could also relate to Ray ...

    More than that though, the general direction of the song lyrically is about moving on with your life, rather than dogmatically clinging to childish delusions.
    Also, particularly in the last verse we get these lines
    It's all the music
    It's all in your brain
    You've used all the old licks
    Now it's all gotta change.
    Don't get stuck in a rut. Don't do what you think you need to do to appease a certain group of people. Move on, try something new, approach things from a different perspective. Get on with it and stop spinning your wheels.

    To some degree it gives me the same kind of feeling that No More Looking Back and Life On The Road give me. It sort of comes across as a slightly cryptic announcement of intent.

    Well that's one perspective anyhow.... I'm not sure where it came from, but when reading through this morning that is what came to mind.

    From a more straight interpretation, we have a sort of diss song, but not naming the target, and not really mean, but an attempt at strong persuasion.
    The first four lines seem to address presentation issues, and it isn't that there is anything particularly wrong with that presentation so much, as it is a front, a facade, a pretentious costume to make some kind of obscure statement that nobody cares about.
    I guess folks are going to be upset about the "You talk like a docker but you act like a queer" but I don't think this is any kind of slur on homosexuals, I think it is another pointer to the pretensious nature being presented. The play acting.... which is a fun thing to do sometimes, but very tedious if it is the only show in town....
    Maybe I have the wrong end of the stick here, but it makes me think of a guy I used to know.... He was gay, and quite obviously so, and that's fine, but there was nothing particularly authentic about anything he did... If he was with one group of people he would speak quite normally, and act quite normally, but then with another group of people he would develop this very obviously manufactured set of mannerisms and speak like some seventies comedian making fun of homosexuals .... perhaps I'm missing something, but that never made any sense to me. It wasn't that one was an act, and one was natural. Both presentations came across as forced and insincere ....

    On the whole the first verse seems to come across like a friend addressing someone they have cared about who is spiraling down this path of conceited pretentiousness, because they feel it is clever, or hip, or whatever.... and it may seem odd to say it's a friend, but someone who isn't a friend wouldn't say a word, they would just move away from you, and stay away. A friend will tell you if you have snot hanging off your nose. Someone who isn't a friend will say nothing, and then likely go and tell someone else you have snot hanging off your nose, with a laugh of conceit.

    Take off your headphones .... there is something sort of insular, and isolating about wearing headphones. The rest of the world doesn't exist anymore, and all you can hear is whatever is channeled through them.... I know because they used to be my favourite way to listen to music, before I got Meniere's Disease...Meniere's causes one of your ears to shut down to some degree.... So I really like the picture Ray paints, just with this one line he is essentially painting a vivid picture of what we are looking at here.
    Hear what's going on .... don't completely isolate yourself from the wider reality. It may not work for you, but if you just sit in the corner with your hands over your ears blathering some la la la la la la's, you aren't going to know...
    You can't live in a timezone, you've got to move on..... again it is about just being realistic. If you're pretending it is still 1955 in 2022, there is something seriously wrong, because even if you prefer that time, or your perspective of what that time was or means, you still have no realistic perspective of the here and now, which is all any of has.
    It's fine to have preferences, but those preferences need to be based in reality.

    Then of course in between we get the straight forward "you need to change your attitude".... and the reality is that most of us to some degree need to change our attitudes ... certainly to varying degrees, and certainly not perpetually, but I feel pretty confident that we all have bad attitudes toward certain things, that could do with some adjustment.

    Ray moves on to suggest that our protagonist here, whether himself or someone else, is living in an unhealthy timewarp.
    But he also moves on to encourage them.... Look, you may have this problem, but you also have the answer to this problem...
    You're the only person that's gonna pull you through
    Ooh, with your attitude...
    This is somewhat a defining moment in the song for me. It has this straight forward and true idea that you have the ability to fix this attitude issue, it is a matter of looking at the broader picture, and stop picking and choosing what you pay attention to.
    For example, the phrase "count your blessings" is actually a really good and healthy thing to do. I have stood on the precipice, and came close to jumping, in a manner of speaking, and I went into a deep reflective thought stream, and the pain that caused the situation was one small part of my reality, that isolation and somewhat of an obsession over that negative thing, had caused me to completely disregard all of the positive things.... it is a form of psychological unreal reality, and very easy to fall prey to.... It is a good exercise to count your blessings. To look at the positive things in your life.... particularly in a time full of bs, because the harder you look the more you'll find... anyway, sorry about the pop psychology, but it just came up... these are stream of consciousness kind of posts and I know they meander sometimes ....

    Ray starts off the next verse with "You've gotta learn to be positive, it's your only chance", and that looks back to the verse before really, it is about adjusting your perspective to see a bigger more realistic picture.... but he moves on to say
    You mustn't be so defensive, you gotta join in the dance
    When we are being defensive, we need to really take stock of why. Is it because we are clinging to something unjustifiable, because it's comfortable? When dealing with addicts, you need to really be careful how you approach certain issues, because due to the self-inflicted shame and guilt, it's really easy to back them into a defensive corner. Once someone is in a defensive corner, they quickly become unreachable ... Sometimes we are defensive purely because we are being attacked, but sometimes it is because we are clinging to a nonsense that we don't want anyone to touch.
    Even here though Ray manages to turn it around into something humourous.
    Join in the dance. Don't sit on the wall being miserable, get up and dance.
    Quickly he comes in with the, but it's not your dancing that you gotta improve, it's your attitude :)
    that line always gave me a chuckle.

    The final outro verse could be seen as a different way of saying the same thing, but I can't help feeling that it is a subtle inference of where Ray is heading with the Kinks.

    Anyway, for me this is a great lyric that can be taken in many many ways. It isn't that it is too vague to pinpoint at all. It's really that it's going to depend on your attitude as to how you want to interpret the lyrics....

    Musically we open with a very rock and roll riff. Dave has a great rock guitar sound. That beautiful saturated crunchy rock guitar sound. It has energy and attitude, the bass comes in and we get some accents on the toms leading us into the first verse.
    One thing I have noticed from around the mid seventies somewhere the band moved to using ascending scaler ideas rather than the descending scaler ideas that we all seemed to notice were so prominent in the sixties.... and here again we get this ascending chord pattern, that gives us this forward thrust.
    We literally open up here with, what I guess would be termed as, a straight chromatic run of chords. G, A, B, C ...
    The last run through the voicing of the chords changes, and Ray sings it differently, but it is the same pattern. It is a really nice simple tool to give it a different sound and feel, and it works really well.

    From the start here the vocal delivery is in your face and sort of aggressive, but I prefer to hear it as intense.
    It seems like the band decided to jump out of the gate here, with no dillydallying around. Just punch the gates open and run.
    Although the opening verse may seem like we have a big shouty song, it is basically only there for the opening verse.
    To me it is a great way to start the album. It is a statement of intent, it isn't a reflective ponderance, it is a straight forward smack in the face, saying hey pay attention.
    It probably isn't going to work for everyone, but it works well for me.
    Certainly Ray puts on his broad Cockney accent, and there could be many reasons for this, but it seems to me that the working class are generally more straight forward about things. there isn't generally a show of airs and graces, you are generally going to be told straight up.
    There could be an influence from punk, I'm certainly not saying there isn't, but I don't really hear this as punk.

    We actually move through a few different phases between that opening assault and the pre-chorus and chorus, and that opening to the song isn't repeated through the course of the song, which is interesting in itself.

    The way the song is structured it is almost like initially there is this burst of annoyance.
    Then when we move to the pre-chorus, or perhaps it is just the beginning or the chorus, there is a sympathetic change of tone. Look it isn't these things that are wrong, you just need to adjust your attitude.

    Then we move into the chorus, and it in itself is a beautiful piece of writing with that great halftime feel dropping in, and the super singalongable chorus with the backing vocals adding a lot of texture and melody, and just a generally good vibe about it.
    To some degree the Attitude chorus is related to the Who's Who Are You, but not in such a distinct way as to distract. In fact it is only today that this even appeared to me, after forty years of hearing the song.
    Later on in the song when the drums drop out and we get the handclaps section and it is a little closer.

    The next verse we are essentially singing over the song's opening riff. The pre-chorus is removed and we go straight into the singalongy chorus.
    This moves into a chord change that at least gives the feel of a key change.
    It gives the feeling of moving along, and in that regard matches the lyrics perfectly.
    We also have these backing vocal ooh's, that almost sound like they are mocking the Beach Boys.

    We modulate back towards the opening key, and we get the opening riff section again for the verse.
    Then we move back into the chorus, and we open it this time with no drums, but the backing vocals and a nice rhythm guitar that has a few nice lead licks thrown in. The drums accent the beat and come back in with the half time feel.

    At this point we get this really cool sounding chord riff that is something new again. It's a really excellent sounding dirty guitar, and the way the guitars play off against each other rhythmically is excellent.
    The next verse starts over this chordal riff and then we get a held chord that leads us to the out section of the verse and runs us into the chorus.

    Then we get the last verse sung over the chorus structure but without the halftime feel, and with the backing vocals in the rear.

    We end the song with a nice jam-like section, and after a staggered descending line we get some synth just adding a bit of sonic flare, and for me it sounds really excellent in its context.

    The song fades off somewhat unresolved, but not totally.

    This is a really excellent opener, and there is much more to it than a casual listen may suggest.
    As much as the Hard Way was a nice return to some rock stylings, and as much as there were some nice rock tracks on Sleepwalker and Misfits, here the band bury any of that in the dust, with this feisty rocker that has a lot more going on in it than one may initially feel.

    For me this gets the album off to a great start and it sets a partial tone for where we are going here. There is more to the lyric and the music than one may initially see, and it all works together beautifully as a song .... and it also continues the great tradition of Kinks songs marrying lyrics and music together beautifully.

     
  4. croquetlawns

    croquetlawns Forum Resident

    Location:
    Scotland
    The song starts off well, I'm liking the riff (a bit Sex Pistols - please remind me which song!) and the music generally, and then Ray starts barking at me, and the first time was a real wtf moment! He calms down in the chorus, but overall the vocals in this are pretty forced and awful, preventing me from enjoying the song. I suspect that some will say that Ray's vocal may have been inspired by punk singers, as I can see that, but I'm not sure if that's the case. Whatever the reason, I don't like it!
     
  5. Fortuleo

    Fortuleo Used to be a Forum Resident

    I was a little boy when punk came and went, so I missed out on it (even was afraid of it). Later in my teens, I decided it wasn’t something that should be embraced after the fact. Nor something that could be done properly from a central Paris middle-class angle.
    Because of that, I’m probably the least qualified person to address the current debate on this thread : is Low Budget punk or not punk? But I’ll give my two cents anyway. I say not punk at all, and not trying to be either. Not in the least, judging by this first song alone. You don’t put those piano chord and female “ooh ooh”’s when you want to “punk out”. The opening riff is a bit Pistols Pretty Vacant, but much more Van Halen proto-metal (my first encounter with the Kinks was on an older cousin’s cassette of Van Halen's first record. I instantly loved one song on it, I bet you can guess which one…). But the opening “Barky Ray” (bravo @Brian x, sorry @ARL!) is no punk, it's bad amateurish garage bar rock. No doubt in my mind that it is 100% deliberate. If this is not satire, I don’t know what is, especially since “Funny Ray” then takes over for the remnant of the track, with his high-pitched tongue in cheek poker face delivery. The song could be about any aging sixties know-it-all who looked down on new bands, new trends, new kids. It could very well be about someone like Pete Townshend in a bad night, which would explain why the song at times does sound like a musical extension to the preceding year’s epiphanic Who Are You, Pete’s infamous recount of a drunken scuffle with members of the Sex Pistols. I guess it could be addressed to any of them aging rock’n roll dudes, really, and especially to Ray himself, a self-reminder to stop eying the current culture scornfully, like he was always prone to do, since day one.
    I realize now that I’ve long dismissed this song because like @croquetlawns, I was instantly appalled by the outrageous singing of the first verse (thankfully, it stops altogether after that) but also because I was misled into thinking that it was indeed an attempt at riding the punk wave by both its advocates (because "it rocks") and detractors (because "it sucks"), who seemed to agree that it was at least meant to be punk. I see now that it’s much more interesting than that, it's clearly meant to satirize such an attempt and fail at it. As such, this is almost a novelty song, very timely, extremely kwirky, and 100% Ray Davies : a fascinating intricate lyrics/music/performance meta song, mocking its own attitude or pretence, and making a spectacle (and a success!) out of it.
     
  6. croquetlawns

    croquetlawns Forum Resident

    Location:
    Scotland
    I'll go with this!
     
  7. stewedandkeefed

    stewedandkeefed Came Ashore In The Dead Of The Night

    So listening to this song this morning, I certainly heard what others have referred to as "shouty" Ray but this song begins in that mode and then offers some variety in styles (I heard Beach Boys style backing vocals in there att one point to name one). It is a good opener to the album that offers some different moods. Plus that chorus gets into your brain pretty quickly and plants itself there. I knew this song from the Kinks live tapes I have heard from the Low Budget tour but hearing the studio version today, I found it really impressive. In fact, I may be singing that chorus to myself all day today.
     
  8. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    I suppose with a really broad bow one could say it is similar to Pretty Vacant at the start, but that would be an extremely long bow, as Pretty Vacant is just double hits on octave notes.
    The riff is a straight rock and roll riff. There isn't really anything punk about it.
     
  9. Ex-Fed

    Ex-Fed Not Fed Ex

    Location:
    New York State
    I like Ray's lyrics better when he's not pointing fingers at individuals. What happened to celebrating eccentricity? Chorus is catchy.
     
  10. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    It's not even remotely punk, and the more I listen, the less I hear it.
    To me it's like folks have been hearing the "Kinks do punk" line for so long, that the opening vocal, that goes away very quickly is about the only link at all
     
  11. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Grunge group The Melvins covered this track in 2013 on their covers album ‘Everybody Loves Sausages’ with none other than Clem Burke of Blondie guesting on drums, filmed here playing his bit in impressive isolation. Interesting given the Blondie (amongst other new wave groups) aping accusations being thrown around re: Low Budget to see their drummer staking his claim to this track over 30 years later.

     
  12. Steve62

    Steve62 Vinyl hunter

    Location:
    Murrumbateman
    Attitude

    Is Ray mocking punk? If so why is he doing it when punk in the UK had already waned? Either way, why bother when the album was clearly aimed at America where kids generally didn’t give a bollocks about punk?

    I’m not going to answer any of those questions. But I will argue that Attitude is not trying to be punk or a punk cliché. The song diverges from punk/garage in several ways – it’s on the long side, it changes tempo, a piano is heard, as are handclaps. And there is Dave singing most un-punkishly “oo oo oo”. To paraphrase Siegfried in Get Smart, “Starker, ve do not do ‘oo oo oo’ in PUNK!” :winkgrin:

    But what most differentiates Attitude is its lyrical content. I used the word “mocking” but the lyrics are too obvious to be satirical and too kind to be cruel. The target is vague: the closest we get is the line “the 80s are here ….. and you’re still waiting for 1960 to happen.” This conjures the image of an Eddie Cochran wannabe. I recall a few young rockers in 1978-79 who had a Cochran-esque look but who is Ray singing about and why? I don’t think it matters because whomever the target, the song is ultimately sympathetic, with the last verse saying “you will endure”. Could it be Johnny Thunder I wonder....

    So, to me this is a good noisy rock song with lyrics that are open to interpretation. And Dave’s snarling guitar sounds fantastic. In other words, this is a good Kinks rocker.
     
  13. Vangro

    Vangro Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    To me this sounds like a middle aged rock band's idea of punk, the fact that it doesn't sound that much like punk is because they can't actually play it and have no feel for it. It's like watching your dad trying to dance to some current hit single at a wedding reception. In this period of the Kinks, I keep being reminded of terrible punk parodies in programmes like Not The Nine O'Clock News, they didn't sound anything like punk either because the writers obviously don't have a clue what they're doing.
     
  14. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    This is a rock and roll song. It isn't a punk song...
    Let's not forget that punk was aping rock and roll
     
  15. Vangro

    Vangro Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    It wasn't aping anything, it was its own thing. This is why parodies of punk that just took a R&B tune, sped it up and shouted in a Cockney accent over the top sound like inauthentic crap.
     
    Ex-Fed, DISKOJOE and ajsmith like this.
  16. ARL

    ARL Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    "Attitude"

    I have to say that I spotted the resemblance to the chorus of "Who Are You" very early on - like probably my first listen all those years ago! Which is strange, because The Who are just as much of a blind spot for me as the Stones are, and I've been blissfully ignorant for all these years of the supposed Stones rip-off in the next track.

    This is a track that's disconcerting initially because of Ray's opening diatribe, but after that it settles down into a palatable enough rocker. It's similar to the openers of the next two albums in that it feels longer than it actually is. It's always amusing to hear a lyric that specifically looks forward to the 1980s, and "Attitude" does seem very much based in a late 70s new-wave-but-not-really-new-wave sound. I certainly wouldn't call it a favourite, but it has its moments. My favourite bit starts about 2:40 - you can imagine the video cliche here where Ray is menacingly striding down an alley towards you with the band one step behind him.

    It's a good start to the album, but I think there is much better to come.
     
  17. mark winstanley

    mark winstanley Certified dinosaur, who likes physical product Thread Starter

    Punk was a group of disaffected youth, that were tired of overly complex music from big bands, that took rock music back to its basics.
    They had their own lyrics, from their own perspectives, but the whole musical presentation was rock and roll.
    Even the Pistols when interviewed said they just thought of themselves as a rock band.
     
  18. Vangro

    Vangro Forum Resident

    Location:
    London
    I didn't say it wasn't rock music, it wasn't 'aping rock and roll' though. If that was all it was doing then there was already pub rock for that.
     
  19. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    I came in with GTPWTW in late 1981 so Low Budget was still in the air to some degree. Never heard this track til many years later either on One For The Road or Low Budget itself as opposed to the then consistent airplay on my rock station of the title track and the two big singles. It's good but not a fave necessarily. Like others have mentioned, 1979 was a bit of a reckoning for many veteran acts. I was a devout Blondie fan by this point but had an increasing appreciation for the 60's acts that were still pumping out new material that of course continues to this day. The Kinks were doing just fine even if their most stellar material was behind them by now. I stay on the train til the MCA years. Perhaps this thread changes that
     
  20. ajsmith

    ajsmith Forum Resident

    Location:
    Glasgow

    I kinda agree, with regards to the delivery of the opening bit at least, esp on the line 'you talk like a docker but you act like a queer': NTNO'CN parody bands are a good comparison: I'm also reminded of cash in 'punk' bands made up of ex proggers like The Monks (not the American 60s group but ex Strawbs members) and The Pork Dukes (once upon an early 70s known as Gnidrolog!) who somewhat contemptuously thought they could give this new punk crap a go and that all you had to do with speed up your tempos and start barking out naughty words. The Kinks song isn't that basic though, (naturally) and it starts to improve markedly musically and lyrically from 0.36, even if it still seems written by committee and second guessing at least that form suits the content of the song. I can't say I love it but it's entertaining enough. I never noticed the Who Are You rip before but it's pretty blatant to me now it's been pointed out: with this and the Stones thing on the very next track, I can understand why many take the tack that Ray had completely run out of musical ideas by this point even if I don't agree.

     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2022
  21. fspringer

    fspringer Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
     
  22. Steve62

    Steve62 Vinyl hunter

    Location:
    Murrumbateman
    Rob Brydon doing an impression of Mick Jagger doing an impression of Michael Caine is something to behold. Bravo.
     
  23. fspringer

    fspringer Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York City
    Attitude: I think the whole punk thing was Ray's way of inferring that he, and The Kinks by extension, could do this, too. He doesn't maintain that vocal through the whole song. They could do disco, too, as he'd already demonstrated with the lead-in single. I remember hearing this for the first time, that night it was premiered on the radio and thinking, wow, this is a whole new direction! But in some respects, it really wasn't, just a way of touching up a Kinks' harder rock song. It's a good lead-off track to announce their new harder-rocking intentions, but I really don't go back to it all that much.

    Re: Pickwick. Oh yeah ... I had more than a few Pickwick albums in my collection. Something about RCA artists ... Pear was another of those bargain labels that would pick up RCA artists and repackage their less-successful material. My attitude was if your album was reissued on Pickwick, you knew hard times as a recording artist. I never saw Lou Reed's first album for decades. But ... I had the cheaply-packaged two-disc collection issued by Pear (featuring RNR Animal Lou with shades and peroxided hair on the cover), featuring most of the tracks from that album interspersed with various live takes of early 70s Lou. This is why I never begrudged The Kinks their lates 70s/early 80s success ... they got Pickwicked and knew real pain!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2022
  24. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    "They got Pickwicked and knew real pain!" If this doesn't sound like a lost Ray lyric, I don't know what DOES!
     
  25. stewedandkeefed

    stewedandkeefed Came Ashore In The Dead Of The Night

    Absolutely hilarious. This clip shows at least Mick has a sense of humour about his persona

    https://youtu.be/Bxjfr-cgTL8
     

Share This Page

molar-endocrine