The Late, Late, Late Show

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by ando here, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Back in the day there was nothing like kicking back - or waking up - at 2 or 3 in the morning, grabbing a favorite snack and checking out a late show on tv. It was uually black & white, classic Hollywood actors, directors or a corny sci-fi or horror potboiler. Well, there are lots of them on YouTube now. Tell us about the latest great (or not so great) free black & white classic you just saw - or are about to see on The Tube. Preferably one with a good transfer (or HD quality). Granted, none of them stay up forever - but give us a tip about the interesting ones. Post it if you can!

    Tonight I'm checking out an old Rod Serling (of The Twilight Zone) flick from 1956 called, Patterns.

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    Other than the poster I have no idea about what I'll see - which was sort of the charm of the old late shows (Boris Kaufman behi d the camera!). Til next time, Cheers Night Owls (And don't forget to leave a good suggestion if you come across one)!
    :-popcorn:
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
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  2. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Wow. Patterns was much better than I expected - even from Rod Serling. The ending was not entirely believable but the white collar morality tale was a different take on the usual fare from the era. Recommended.

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    The Killer That Stalked New York (1950, Earl McEvoy)

    Watching this YouTube joint tonight. Another first viewing. Diamond smugglers carry smallpox into the city. Should be interesting!

     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
  3. JohnO

    JohnO Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Patterns was first a live TV play on Kraft Television Theatre. It was so good they put it on again, live. Then came the movie which added extra scenes to give a movie length. You have another treat to see....


    Even if this doesn't exactly fit your thread topic, I wish these superior old TV plays were repeated on TV as much as some other stuff is.
     
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  4. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    [​IMG]

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    Peter Ibbetson - Wikipedia

    Peter Ibbetson is a 1935 American black-and-white drama/fantasy film directed by Henry Hathaway and starring Gary Cooper and Ann Harding. The film is based on a novel of the same name by George du Maurier, first published in 1891. A tale of a love that transcends all obstacles, it relates the story of two youngsters who are separated in childhood and then drawn together by destiny years later. Even though they are separated in real life because Peter is unjustly convicted of murder (it was actually self-defense), they discover they can dream themselves into each other's consciousness while asleep. In this way, they live out their lives together. The transitions between reality and fantasy are captured by the cinematography of Charles Lang, as discussed in the documentary Visions of Light (1992).​

    ---

    The film received a positive reception from André Breton and other proponents of Surrealism; Breton commended it as "a triumph of surrealist thinking".​

     
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  5. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Hear, hear! :agree: Thanks.
     
  6. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Queued. Looking forward to this. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
  7. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Oh, and Visions of Light is a great doc.


    (1992, Arnold Glassman, Todd McCarthy)
     
  8. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]Open City (1945, Rossellini)

    I can never catch this film in it's entirety! Finally, I can enjoy it (fingers crossed) before I tuck in a little later. One of the most reknown of the Italian Neo-Realist films, of course. Less sentimental than Bicycle Thief (though it's been years since I've seen that one, too.) The above ad is a peculiar one; never thought of an occupation film as sexy.

     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
  9. ssmith3046

    ssmith3046 Forum Resident

    I grew up in small towns. New Mexico and Wyoming, so we had three channels and after Johnny Carson TV was done. I had grandparents in Long Beach so it was always amazing to go visit for the summer. This was late fifties to mid sixties so nothing like the variety nowadays but back then it seemed unlimited. And, there were the late shows.
     
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  10. Dillydipper

    Dillydipper Sultan Of Snark

    Location:
    Central PA
    The "Late Late Late Show" for me in teeny Terre Haute IN, was Friday or Saturday night, riding my bike back from work. As my parents were already in bed, I could turn on the teevee real quiet, where the local channels were beyond the national anthem and the test pattern, and fire up the antenna rotor. I could pull in channels 3's, 5's and 6's from two, three states over. I could get signals from Evansville, Dayton, sometimes Chicago, and if conditions were right, even Canada.

    It wasn't about the entertainment, it was just about seeing how far I could reach from the antenna on top of our roof. Just another reminder that, there was life outside of our one-horse town.
     
  11. drmark7

    drmark7 Forum Resident

    I miss "The Late, Late Show." Now over half of what's on the late, late night landscape is infomercials.
     
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  12. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Say brother, Can you spare 2 dimes?

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    Rome Express (1932, Walter Forde)

    The plot looks a bit convoluted but this is supposed to be The Grandaddy of all train heist thrillers. We'll see!

     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2020
  13. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    A Night To Remember
    (1958, Bill Ward Baker)

    Can't help it! Whenever I come across it I stop everything and watch. Still the best Titanic movie in my book. And, yes, it's the Criterion print:

     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2020
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  14. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Macbeth (1948, Orson Welles)

    I still watch the streamers that come and go. The production encourages a small screen version of Shakespeare's story. Welles' background in radio and tv helped him in this regard. And, as should happen, school kids fly to this version over reading the text (almost always without context in classrooms) the world over. I first saw it eons ago during some restless late night. It's been my favorite Shakespeare movie ever since.

     
  15. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    House of Strangers (1949, J. Mankiewicz)

    Ok, this one's gotta be good. Edward G. Robinson, Susan Hayward, Mankiewicz direction... unlikely collaboration for a dud. Anyway, it's tonight's YouTube late feature for me. Cheers!

     
  16. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    House of Strangers was good, if not exceptional, stuff from Mankiewicz and Co.

    This one tonight is a legend - that I've never seen. With the exception of Sancho, The Baliff and Ugetsu most of the Kenji Mizoguchi films that I've viewed have dealt with wonen struggling in the very rigid male hierarchy of traditional Japan. He, more or less, deliberately set out to examine a woman's struggle to survive during The Edo period and contempirary life. So this film is something of an anomoly though based on a well known Japanese story:

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    The 47 Ronin (1941)

    I won't go near the Keanu Reeves remake until I've watch this original:

     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
  17. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]
    Night and the City (1950, Jules Dassin)

    Good print. Finally watching it tonight.

     
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  18. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]

    Sometimes a great print will keep me hooked. Like this one of Alfred Hitchcock's 1936 British film, Sabotage:

     
  19. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]
    Odd Man Out (Carol Reed, 1947)

    It's slipped from my top 3 films of all time but I still enjoy watching whenever I see it playing...

     
  20. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]

    Jeez, how'd I find Joe Mankiewicz here? Tonight's late show is the 1933 version of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Apparently, Mank wrote the adapted screenplay. After years of avoiding it I'm just getting around to reading it and thought I'd try the movie - a good version. This poster makes a case for the black and white '33 version over all the others -



    the film - complimentsof the Internet Archive
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2020
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  21. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Did you catch the Godfather parallels?
     
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  22. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Similarities more than parallels, wouldn't you say? With this film the prodigal son runs off with the outsider and forsakes his family. Remaining with them would mean continuing the cycle of violence and resentment. Michael Corleone never leaves the family; symbolically, he becomes the family. But one man can't be that in reality which is why he fails. To me it's a different trajectory than Robinson's son, though the overall flashback to the great immigrant father storyline is similar.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2020
  23. WLL

    WLL Popery Of Mopery

    ...Though this is maybe a little too nerdy (Self-depreciation:angel::cry::shake::rolleyes:!) - I have wished to talk about TV vintage-flick programming of old, " Late Late Shows " both metaphoric and the literal trademark, I think a trademark of CBS and exclusively used by CBS owned-and-operated stations until David Letterman signed with the Eye and they applied it to him:confused:? I grew up in the NYC metroplex, with NYC TV stations.
    Going by info I've seen online, WCBS-TV New York had a " Late Show " and " Late Late Show " but didn't have a branded " Late Late Late Show ":yikes:. Awwwwwwww. I could swear I remember sometimes getting up very early and seeing an I.D
    for the LLL Show on TV. Oh well:rolleyes:. I have read IIRC that CBS had as much as FIVE! movies, with " Late Late Show II " and " Late Late Show III ", tho.
     
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  24. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Four sons (counting Tom Hagen)

    Self made Italian-American patriarch holds to archaic ways of doing business, frustrating his modern-thinking sons

    One son is an unscrupulous lawyer

    One son is weak willed

    One son is slow witted

    One younger son is favored

    One older son is jealous and resents being passed over for the favored younger son

    HoS even uses the famous bit of business where a guy shows (lack of) nerves by the way he uses a cigarette lighter. EGR is smoking a cigar and gets Efrem Zimbalist to light it. EZ's hand is shaking. EGR can tell he's worried about something.

    And what happens in the GF outside the hospital after the hit men drive off? Enzo can't light his own cigarette, but Michael lights it without twitching a muscle. Even he is a bit surprised at his own cool under fire, signaling that he, not Sonny, is the rightful heir.

    I am convinced Puzo saw HoS and maybe even read Jerome Weidman's novel. Puzo, despite his commercial failures, moved in Manhattan literary circles in the '50s and 60s -- they may have even known each other.

    [​IMG]
     
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  25. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Oh yeah, I see what you mean. Ain't the same film, tho. Coppola gets underneath the story to reveal the humanity, ugly and otherwise, in the similar storylines. E.G. Robinson's performance, imo, is the only thing on this level in House of Strangers.
     

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