The Late, Late, Late Show

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by ando here, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    The Gospel According To St. Matthew (1964, Pier Paolo Pasolini)

     
  2. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    The Man In The White Suit (1951, Alexander Mackendrick)

    An Alec Guinness classic I haven't seen.
    the film (Internet Archive)
     
  3. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    Little Fugitive (1953)

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    Written & Directed by:
    Ray Ashley
    Morris Engel
    Ruth Orkin

    A young boy is cruelly tricked into believing he has accidentally shot and killed his older brother. Alone and afraid, he runs away to Coney Island.

    You don't really need to worry about the plot. What matters here is that what Shadows did for film acting, Little Fugitive did for indie filmmaking. Shot with a portable, concealed 35mm camera, it went out into the streets using thousands of New Yorkers as unknowing extras. Truffaut later cited it as an influence on the French New Wave.

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    Morris Engel and Ruth Orkin

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    Little Fugitive (1953 film) - Wikipedia
     
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  4. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    [​IMG]
    Brief Encounter (1945, Davis Lean)

    This one used to be a late, late show staple. It's one of Western Cinema's classic romances. Cast and crew we're top notch. And I must confess that, next to the cinematography, Celia Johnson's delivery of the Queen's English is the chief draw. ;)


    full show
     
  5. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
     
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  6. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    :uhhuh:
     
  7. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Since we're heading in that direction...

     
  8. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Paths of Glory (1957, Stanley Kubrick)

    A story of disgrace. Never gets old as vainglory is always afoot. One of Kubrick's best. imo.

    full film (internet archive)
     
  9. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Repost (glad it to see it replaced)

     
  10. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Double Feature:

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    Nothing But A Man (1964, Michael Roemer)

    An unpretentious love story in a Black Southern community, circa 1964.



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    The Emperor Jones (1933, Dudley Murphy)

    An expanded version of Eugene O'Neill's play. Full of low down characters and mugging by Robeson but clearly he's having great fun in this romp about an African American scamp who eventually outwits himself. And that golden baritone gets to shine pretty. One of my favorites.

    The Emperor Jones (YouTube)
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2020
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  11. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    I just learned that this 1967 version is in fact a musical, with music and lyrics by no less than Richard Rodgers:

     
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  12. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
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    Four married couples think they've found paradise in postwar suburbia, but little do they suspect what lays simmering beneath the surface of paradise...

    Dramatically effective and sociologically fascinating soaper. Director Martin Ritt always got solid performances from his actors; NDP is notable as the most successful dramatic role ever for Tony Randall -- the scene where he low-pressure sells the used car is a minor classic. Written by the blacklisted Ben Maddow but credited to the perennial front (and allegedly semi-literate) Philip Yordan.

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    David Bowie letter to first American fan mail appears online from 1967

    I hope one day to get to America. My manager tells me lots about it as he has been there many times with other acts he manages. I was watching an old film on TV the other night called “No Down Payment” a great film, but rather depressing if it is a true reflection of The American Way Of Life.​
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2020
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  13. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Interesting intro. Thanks.
     
  14. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Two For The Seesaw
    (1962)

    '62 has long been my favorite year for films. But I'm checking out some that I've never seen this week starting with this Robert Wise flicker.

     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2020
  15. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
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    Directed by Max Ophuls
    Written by Howard Koch, from the story by Stefan Zweig
    Cinematography by Franz Planer

    A roué concert pianist seduces a girl and immediately forgets her. But she stays in love with him all her life, leading to tragedy.

    Just about the Europeanest movie ever made in Hollywood, as Max Ophuls recreates the prewar Vienna of his youth, in that cynical-romantic manner that is so difficult for Americans to capture. A favorite film of Stanley Kubrick and -- I kid you not -- Elvis Presley.

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    "I will only thank you for the richness of that night, sparkling with desire, hovering in bliss. When I opened my eyes in the dark and felt you at my side, I was surprised not to see the stars above me, I could feel heaven so close — no, I never regretted it, beloved, for the sake of that hour I never regretted it. I remember that when you were asleep and I heard your breathing, felt your body, while I was so close to you, I shed tears of happiness in the dark."

    “But you smiled at me and said consolingly, "People come back again." "Yes" I said, "they come back, but then they have forgotten". There must have been something odd, something passionate in the way I said that to you. For you rose to your feet as well and looked at me, affectionately and very surprised. You took me by the shoulders. "What's good is not forgotten; I will not forget you," you said, and as you did so you gazed intently at me as if to memorize my image.”

    "Only now did I come to life again myself, knowing that I was near you, you, my only dream. I did not guess that in reality I was as far from your mind now, when only the thin, bright glass pane stood between you and my radiant gaze, as if valleys, mountains and rivers separated us."

    - Stefan Zweig, Letter from an Unknown Woman, 1922



    Max Ophuls and Joan Fontaine between takes

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  16. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Nice write-up. I've yet to recover from Lola Montez; the only other Ophuls film I've seen. But Fontaine's presence makes this a promising watch. Thanks.
     
  17. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Whatever Happened To Baby Jane? (1962, Robert Aldrich)

    I wasn't aware that this potboiler featuring the two biggest classic Hollywood queens was originally a 1960 Henry Farrell novel. Studios didn't want to give director, Aldrich, a dime for "those old broads", Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. But the two and Aldrich scored a mega-hit. To the day she died Davis swore Crawford schemed to deny her a third Oscar. Her immortal crackpot performance is the ultimate prize.

     
    Last edited: May 3, 2020
  18. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
    A shot that does not call for tracks
    Is agony for poor old Max,
    Who, separated from his dolly,
    Is wrapped in deepest melancholy.
    Once when they took away his crane,
    I though he'd never smile again.


    -- James Mason

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  19. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
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  20. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dixie
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    Directed by John M. Stahl
    Screenplay by William Hurlbut, George O'Neil and Arthur Richman, based (uncredited) on the story "Letter From An Unknown Woman" by Stefan Zweig

    An earlier version of the story, part of Universal's series of soapers made at the same time as their better remembered monster sagas. The story is reset into the WWI to Wall Street Crash time frame, a popular device of the period. But the big alteration is in the character of the man: he's no longer a caddish scoundrel, but just an ordinary guy looking to get some before shipping out overseas. I'm sure this is a minority opinion, but IMHO this change, intentionally or not, actually adds an emotional dimension missing in the technically superior remake -- at least in this version's best scene, when the girl is reunited with the man in a postwar homecoming parade. The blank non-presence of leading man John Boles also ironically adds to the sequence.

    This was the film debut of the extraordinarily talented actress Margaret Sullavan, who made too few films.

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  21. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Well, it's very late in the life of an old professor featured in Ingmar Bergman's classic, Wild Strawberries (1958).

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    (w/English subs)
     
  22. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Pickup On South Street (1953, Sam Fuller)

    One of the great ones from Fuller. Can it be flawless?

     
  23. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
    Turning in earlier than usual tonight so this is my super late show...

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    Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock)
     
  24. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946, Tay Garnet)

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    the film (Internet Archive)
     
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  25. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    new york, ny
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    Bicycle Thieves
    (1949, Vittorio De Sica)

    Released as Bicycle Thief here in The States it's been a couple of decades since I saw it last. Turning in after a not so late viewing. Night!

     

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