The Rolling Stones "Time Is On My Side"?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Evan L, May 27, 2003.

  1. Evan L

    Evan L Beatologist Thread Starter

    Location:
    Vermont
    Time Is On My Side?

    I recently pulled out an old cassette a friend had made for me of the Rolling Stones' greatest hits package Hot Rocks/1964-1971. It kicked off with a different version of "Time Is On My Side", one with just an organ(instead of the organ/guitar combo of the "hit" version).

    Does anyone know if this is particular to a certain version of the album(say, the English Decca release)? Are there two "official" versions of this song(like, say, "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place" by the Animals)? I actually prefer the "hit" of Time better, but this version is interesting enough.
     
  2. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    This version, usually called the "organ" version for its four organ chords before Mick sings "Time is on my side...," is the original single version and also appeared on the LP 12 x 5.

    The other version, usually called the "guitar" version for its guitar lick before Mick sings, made its first appearance on the original Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass) LP in 1966. It also was used on the original Hot Rocks (the U.S. version, anyway) and was used erroneously on the 1989 version of Singles Collection/The London Years, as it was never released as a 45.

    Both were recorded in 1964 and are completely different recordings.
     
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  3. Matt

    Matt New Member

    Location:
    Illinois
    Wasn't the guitar-intro version originally used for Rolling Stones No. 2 (UK only, of course)?

    BTW, anyone know where to get the US version of "We Gotta Get Out Of This Place"? EVERYONE who's heard of it says it so much better, but I've never, ever heard it anywhere.
     
  4. Steve Hoffman

    Steve Hoffman Your host Your Host

    MatrixDude,

    That "Organ Alone" version IS the hit version.
     
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  5. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    The single(mono only)version of "Time" was, IIRC, recorded in England; the alternate take(mono and stereo versions exist)was recorded here, likely at Chess Studios(without my book handy, can't be sure--outside chance it was in L.A.).

    At any rate, organ-only intro = hit version. And there is no stereo for it.

    ED:cool:
     
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  6. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    Find a nice, clean MGM original 45.
     
  7. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    For those that have never heard it, I recommend a listen to Irma Thomas' original version of Time Is On My Side . Its gospel influence makes a great segue into the Stones' You Can't Always Get What You Want
     
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  8. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    Agreed! And if you want to hear a great overview of Irma's career, check out SWEET SOUL QUEEN OF NEW ORLEANS: THE IRMA THOMAS COLLECTION, on Razor&Tie. Remastered by some guy named Feinblatt....:D ;) Indeed, another SH masterwork, hopefully some copies are still floating around in case any of you missed it(for shame).

    ED:cool:
     
  9. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    Or, nice, clean MONO copies of either MGM Lp ANIMAL TRACKS or BEST OF THE ANIMALS. I believe by the time Abkco started reissuing this material in the early '70s, the UK version was substituted, and has been ever since.

    ED:cool:
     
  10. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    And if you can't find the SH Irma, the EMI compilation will do. But well, you might want the best if you can snag it....:)

    ED:cool:
     
  11. chip-hp

    chip-hp Cool Cat

    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Irma's is a great version ... and it is her "original" version ... but there is a version that predates her version by several months that was recorded in New Orleans that probably gave rise to Irma's version ... anybody know the version to which I am referring?
     
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  12. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    Kai Winding's version on Verve 10307....I have a stock on that one. Promo would be nicer, though, but I'm a greedy man....

    ED:cool:
     
  13. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    thanks for the info. Another one to track down. BTW, the Irma track is also on the great OOP Rhino History of New Orleans Rhythm and Blues Vol. 1
     
  14. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    In mono, too, IIRC. I haven't got all my Rhino stuff sorted out yet:rolleyes:

    ED:cool:
     
  15. chip-hp

    chip-hp Cool Cat

    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    That would be the version ... obviously, Kai didn't do the vocal ... I have it on a CD-R and Irma's version is very similar to the female vocalist's version on Winding's 45 ... Is there a vocalist credit on the Verve 45?
     
  16. Ed Bishop

    Ed Bishop Incredibly, I'm still here

    No(it just says 'with Vocal Group'), but the EMI disc's liner notes tell us: the Enchanters, who backed Garnet Mimms on "Cry Baby," among others. The lead vocal is, I would guess, by Zola Peamell.

    Interesting record, but Irma and the Stones did a lot more with it. And the first two recordings were, IIRC, B-sides; amazing the Stones heard of it at all. Somebody's radar was up.

    ED:cool:
     
  17. peter

    peter Senior Member

    Location:
    Paradise


    While we're talkin about the Animals, I recently got a nice UK mono of The Twain Shall Meet. I had a US mono once, but is sounded awful, so I dumped it. Question: are Twain, Winds of Change and Love Is in mono fold-downs. I'd love to know. UK monos of thes three LP's have been on my want list for years!
     
  18. chip-hp

    chip-hp Cool Cat

    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    To which "EMI disc" are you referring?
     
  19. Evan L

    Evan L Beatologist Thread Starter

    Location:
    Vermont
    Thanks for the answers. I was only one year old in 1964, so don't remember that being the "hit" version. However, one question is still unanswered: My U.S. Hot Rocks vinyl has the guitar/organ version. Did the "hit" version appear on non-U.S. versions of this album?
     
  20. mudbone

    mudbone Gort Annaologist

    Location:
    Canada, O!
    Excuses, excuses.....

    mud-:D
     
  21. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    Does anyone have a copy of Bill Wyman's book Rolling' with the Stones ? In it there is a little sidebar about TIOMS. I think that there is another song with a similar title upon which TIOMS is based. I can check the book when I get home tonight and report back tomorrow
     
  22. stereoptic

    stereoptic Anaglyphic GORT Staff

    Location:
    NY
    oops! - wrong song - I was thinking of "This May Be The Last TIme" by The Staple Singers.
     
  23. d.r.cook

    d.r.cook Senior Member

    As many of you probably know, Irma Thomas was quite bitter about the Stones covering TIOMS just a few months following her climb up the chart with it. Can't really blame her, given that they even then were worldwide stars and quite capable of writin hit records.

    I love both versions and the Stones, but can't help feeling it's not unlike the covers Pat Boone knocked out of Little Richard hits such as Tutti Frutti, draining sales from the first hit version.

    The Stones, of course, made an authentic cover of it with a genuine feel for the materal--there's that difference; but still, for someone like Irma Thomas who had few major hits, anyway, it was a devastating blow.

    I've knew of, but have never heard, the winding original.

    I know for years she resented requests for it in live performance. I saw her in a free performance here four years ago, and she was still bringin' it strong!

    doug
     
  24. tim_neely

    tim_neely Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    Central VA
    Not exactly true. Irma might have been upset about the Stones stealing her thunder, but the Stones were not exactly a household name in late 1964 -- "Time Is On My Side" was their very first Top 10 single in the States. And the Stones were not yet prolific songwriters; of all the A-sides of singles before TIOMS, only "Tell Me (You're Coming Back)" was a Jagger-Richards original. In fact, they seemed to give away more of their self-penned tunes than they recorded themselves in 1964 ("That Girl Belongs to Yesterday" went to Gene Pitney, "As Tears Go By" went to Marianne Faithfull, for two examples).

    But after "Time Is On My Side," every Stones single for the next 10 years was written by the band members; not until "Ain't Too Proud to Beg" was a single in 1974 did that streak end.
     
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  25. d.r.cook

    d.r.cook Senior Member

    Well, I was actually thinking it was a year later than it was--after Satisfaction in the summer of '65, everything changed for the Stones.

    But the point remains the same. There were tons of blues things they could've picked up to cover w/o plucking this hit from under Irma Thomas. I've never seen anything where they expressed any regrets, or even acknowledged that maybe it wasn't the most kosher move they ever made.

    doug
     

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