The term " New Wave ".

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by WLL, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. SCOTT1234

    SCOTT1234 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Scotland
    Some really tasty choices there by Bob Stanley. No one ever mentions New Musik but they had some fantastic songs with excellent production. Check out that one they've chosen: 'A map of you'. Hidden pop treasure.
     
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  2. Pavol Stromcek

    Pavol Stromcek Forum Resident

    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Your timeline more or less tracks with mine, though I was still hearing "new wave" in some corners as late as '88, though I think it was starting to seem a bit anachronistic. I didn't hear the term "grunge" until the very early 90s, though, not long before Nevermind came out, but that's probably because I wasn't in Seattle and wasn't tuned-in to that scene anyway.
     
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  3. Mr Sam

    Mr Sam "...don't look so good no more"

    Location:
    France
    Not familiar with New Musik. I will check that one out :thumbsup:
    I don't have a single release from the "Stanley/Wiggs Present" series but I consider purchasing this one.
     
  4. misterdecibel

    misterdecibel Bulbous Also Tapered

    Most Americans, including many here, seem to think that "New Wave" is the stuff that was on MTV when they first signed on, that their local radio stations weren't playing. They are wrong.
     
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  5. Holerbot6000

    Holerbot6000 Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    BUT MTV was so starved for content at first that they often played videos by Devo, the Residents and other weirdo bands that were at the forefront of makin' videos before they really became a marketing tool (something called Art I think), so they did provide a little bit of weirdness exposure even if they didn't mean to.
     
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  6. misterdecibel

    misterdecibel Bulbous Also Tapered

    Oh yeah there was weirdness aplenty on early MTV, but "New Wave" was over before MTV ever went on the air. Not that it ever really existed anyway...
     
  7. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    The word "punk" as a musical definer had been around for years, going back to The Seeds. CREEM used the term in the early 70's
    and Lenny Kaye used it in his original liner notes for Nuggets. Bands like The Dolls, Wayne County, Harlots of 42nd St., Suicide (all centered around the Mercer Arts Center) were called "street rock".
    At first the CBGB bands weren't called anything other than bands, not by them or the audience, which mostly consisted of other band members.
    You're right, PUNK magazine had a lot to do with codifying the whole thing, then in 1975 the media came sniffing around and picked up on the term.
     
  8. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    Well said. Basically you had two reference points: London and New York. As you mentioned, the UK was dominated by one form (Punk), largely by the Pistols, and everybody fell in line. It was more of a pure , consolidated movement. The New York scene was more indicative of the city music as a whole, although ironically it seemed to stem from one area (Bowery) due to the media, which was a false narrative. You hit the head with two of your astute comments: 1) punk was a uk phenomenon and 2) art acts like Talking Heads, Television, etc did not exist in the UK
     
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  9. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    I might add: the West Coast was criminally late to respond to either NY/UK “ Punk” . They didn’t really contribute till the advent of hardcore in the early 80s
     
  10. Picca

    Picca Forum Resident

    Location:
    Modena, Italy
    In Italy too.
     
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  11. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    The Germs ,Black Flag, Screamers, Dickies, Nuns, Dils, The Zeros, The Weirdos, The Last, X, Plugz, The Go-Gos, Black Randy,Agent Orange, Angry Samoans, Toiling Midgets, Crime, The Flesh Eaters...all came up during the second half of the 70's.
    LA, San Francisco, Detroit, Cleveland, New York, Boston, Texas, Canada ....all had their own scene during the same period of time .
    When CBGB had their 2 week summer festival of unsigned bands in 1975 there were bands from everywhere, which was the first time everyone knew that this was a big deal.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
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  12. Hiraeth

    Hiraeth Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    It's true that there were a lot of Cali bands-- The Germs, The Weirdos, The Dickies, The Nuns are the ones i remember most--but i would say they were pretty directly inspired by the UK version of punk in style and music, and AFAIK didn't really emerge until after UK punk hit as a media phenom in 77.

    I would distinguish a scene like that from what you had in places like Akron and Cleveland, where there definitely was a "new music" scene happening in the mid-70s, with bands like Pere Ubu and Devo. Even in Toronto where i lived there was definitely an art rock new wave scene happening long before "punk rock" happened. Patti Smith played Toronto in April 76, and things were already cooking scene wise by that point.

    The thing is, from a perspective of the the eastern part of North America, there wasn't really any kind of gap between the small scenes that existed around The Stooges and The New York Dolls and what came after. The final version of the Dolls played Toronto in July 76! Well after punk had hit. The transition from glam and punk just kind of blurred together for us as if it was all part of one big thing....
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
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  13. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    That's very true.
    One of the last Doll's gigs I saw was at the Little Hippodrome in early 1975 when Malcolm McLaren was sniffing around the scene, and the opening band was Television.
    A lot of the NY glam type bands had played at the Mercer Arts Center, and that scene slid over to CBGB after the Mercer collapsed. Blondie came out of the Stilettoes who were part of the glam scene. There really isn't a clear divide between the glam/Dolls/Mercer era and what was punk starting in 1974.
     
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  14. Hiraeth

    Hiraeth Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    This was an important document of the time, not a great film but significant when it came out in 1976.

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    Would you believe I've never seen that movie?o_O
     
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  16. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    This is the first I've heard of it. Seems a must see...
     
  17. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    I heard of it back then but just never saw it. :shrug:
     
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  18. zen

    zen Forum Resident

    The label New Wave was very useful for "new" artists, by getting a clean slate.
    Thus, they wouldn't be compared to rock artists of the past. It also helped the record companies too.
     
  19. Hiraeth

    Hiraeth Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    It's shot on black and white Super 8, so it's pretty lo-def. But then Super 8 has its own kind of beauty, and it is, in its way, quite striking looking. Biggest issue is that none of the live performances have sync sound, so that's a pretty big drawback!

    notcoming.com | The Blank Generation
     
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  20. danasgoodstuff

    danasgoodstuff Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    [​IMG]
    A different use of the term 'New Wave'.
     
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  21. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    Ah, so more of an art thing, especially with Amos Poe heading it. I probably looked at it and thought "why go see these people in a movie when I've seen them in person?":laugh:
    Just a buncha punks, anyway.:)
     
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  22. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    Well aware of those bands, but the West Coast as a whole was behind the uk punk explosion and nyc scene in terms of magnitude, coverage, and influence. Really did not gain widespread traction until the Dead Kennedys.
     
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  23. Carl Swanson

    Carl Swanson Forum Resident

    I think that in reference to post-punk music, it was kind of an affectation, due to the "hipness" of the French New Wave in cinema.
     
  24. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    Note: Aussies had a vibrant scene spearheaded by the Saints that coincided with nyc/uk .

    Bob Geldolf: the only three bands that mattered: Ramones, Saints, Pistols
     
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  25. Phasecorrect

    Phasecorrect Forum Resident

    Location:
    WI
    And then there was Australia....
     
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