THX logo theme song... an observation?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Platterpus, May 30, 2017.

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  1. Platterpus

    Platterpus Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    MPLS
    In 1970, Beaver & Krause released their third album "In A Wild Sanctuary." Contained within this album is a piece called "Spaced" which has an interesting sound effect that caught my ear when I bought the Beaver & Krause twofer CD back in 1994 of this album paired with thier fourth album Gandharva, while thinking back about this sound being played in the movie theater since the 1980s. Listen starting at the 3:09 mark:



    Then about 15 years later or so I found the Digital Domain - A Demonstration CD and the first track contains the THX logo theme song towards then end of the track. This is credited to another group of musicians. I could not find this track online so I just pulled off the THX logo theme song from a random youtube video:

    THX Deep Note - original uncompressed audio

    While very similar in sound there are slight differences between the two above samples. Iannis Xenakis did a composition (Metastasis) prior to both of the above (1950s) and it shares some similarities of what would become of the first two above samples. Listen to the beginning portion of this:

    Iannis Xenakis - Metastasis (Spectral View)
     
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  2. Sweep.
    Something that would quickly give the audience a sence of the 'power' & 'range' of THX.
    May be as old as audio itself; old as radio at least.
     
  3. MikeInFla

    MikeInFla Forum Resident

    Location:
    Panama City, FL
    Also a very similar sound from Styx (1973) at the 1:15 mark or so:

     
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  4. gregorya

    gregorya Forum Resident

    So we can now call this the STYTHX logo sound :)
     
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  5. MikeInFla

    MikeInFla Forum Resident

    Location:
    Panama City, FL
    From Wiki:

    The Deep Note is THX's audio trademark, being a distinctive synthesized crescendo that glissandos from a low rumble to a high pitch. It was created by Dr. James A. Moorer,[1] a former employee of Lucasfilm's Computer Division in late 1982.[2] The sound is used on trailers for THX-certified movie theaters, home video, video games, and car infotainment systems.

    The Deep Note debuted at the premiere of Return of the Jedi in Los Angeles.[2] Since then, it has gone on to be a pop culture icon both in meme and cult nature, and had been redesigned and rerecorded for the 2015 "Eclipse" trailer

    Previous works[edit]
    Prior to the creation of the Deep Note, several other works made use of similar techniques of frequency spread.

    In their book Analog Days, Trevor Pinch and Frank Trocco point to the track "Spaced," from the 1970 Beaver & Krause album In a Wild Sanctuary as the source for Deep Note. They quote synthesizer builder Tom Oberheim as saying the original analog form is much richer than the "digital perfection" used in movie theatres.

    Another recognized predecessor to the Deep Note is a part in the song by The Beatles, "A Day in the Life", using a full orchestra. However, unlike the Deep Note, the resolving high chord is never held, but instead brought to a stop. Moorer has admitted that both "A Day in the Life" and a fugue in B minor by Bach were sources of inspiration for the Deep Note.[9]

    A very similar sound occurred in the Styx song "Krakatoa" on their album The Serpent is Rising,[10] as well as in the soundtrack to the 1979 movie When a Stranger Calls.
     
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  6. Platterpus

    Platterpus Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    MPLS
    Thanks for the info.
     
  7. Jeff Kent

    Jeff Kent Forum Resident

    Location:
    Mt. Kisco, NY
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