UK Charity (Thrift) Shop CD Hunting

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by MC Rag, Jan 17, 2016.

  1. Dave S

    Dave S Forum Resident

    I suspect it went to someone who scanned the barcode. Thankfully, a lot of CDs I buy don't have barcodes.
     
    Man at C&A likes this.
  2. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    You must be collecting very early CDs. I think I only have one CD without a barcode, The Stranglers Collection 1977-82.
     
  3. Rufus rag

    Rufus rag Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK
    Found an excellent copy of Ambrose Slade LP at a Car Boot sale many moons ago. Car Boots have downsized & you don't see them on every Pub Car Park on a Sunday like to you use to!
     
  4. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    For somebody who's supposed to be one of the great artists of today and gets a nauseating amount of reverence, a lot of people want to get rid of Beyonce's albums.
     
    Erik B. likes this.
  5. JP Christian

    JP Christian Forum Resident

    Wish I had luck like that! I'm still missing several RCAs including that one!
     
  6. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    Trust me, it's not a common occurrence. I should've bought it for 99p... If only to see if it sounds better than the SACD. Which it probably does.:)
     
    JP Christian likes this.
  7. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    All her albums seem to have about 80 songs on them. Perhaps it's too much of a 'good' thing?
     
    Man at C&A likes this.
  8. beccabear67

    beccabear67 Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Victoria, Canada
    Boom! Boom! I want that rekkid! :cool:
     
    stepeanut likes this.
  9. stunner2020

    stunner2020 Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK
    Never found anything good in a charity shop. Get the odd Harry Nilsson or something like that in Oxfam but have you seen their prices? I saw them charging £60 on their website for a copy of Queen's A Day At The Races, when I paid something like £7 for my VG+ copy a couple of years back.

    The other charity shops only ever seem to have James Last or ethnic folk tunes.

    I can also relate to the sheer lack of anything electronic. I did all the charity shops near me a few months back to see what popped up - the only one that had any electronics had a couple of stereos and a PlayStation 2.

    It is, to further echo most other posters, fairly decent for CD's and DVD's though.
     
  10. irwin69

    irwin69 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London UK
    If you collect and deal in classical it generally still makes visiting many charity shops worthwhile. If you don't come across that elusive Vertigo Swirl between The Thompson Twins and The Sound of Music LPs you might still walk out with 3 or 4 classical records or CDs which could help towards buying that Vertigo Swirl you had hoped to find in the first place.
     
    Dave S, Robert C and JP Christian like this.
  11. LivingForever

    LivingForever Always one more tomorrow...

    I've stopped paying attention to CDs but up until a year or so ago it was definitely a fertile time for collecting those in Charity Shops - I had some early Floyd CDs for a couple of quid and hundreds of albums for £1 or £2 that I was just happy to bring home, check out and bring back if I didn't like them.

    Discovered some really great music that way.

    For the last year I've been looking at vinyl pretty much exclusively, and- wow, it's mostly depressing. Novelty LPs, classical and easy listening, like everyone else is finding. If I do find anything genuinely worth having, it'll be priced accordingly (got a nice collection of near mint Jazz/Prog Rock albums in original pressings in the Oxfam in Sevenoaks recently but I paid proper record store prices for them all.)

    Occasionally I get really lucky and find something very cool - got both of the two early Van Der Graaf Generator albums on Pink Scroll Charisma for £15 each recently, not an earth shattering bargain but certainly below what they go for online.

    Otherwise, the pickings are usually so slim that I will pick up anything that's even vaguely interesting, if I find it in a charity shop. Chicago, Joe Jackson, Abba, Sister Sledge.

    It was amusing when I ummmed and ahhed over a VG copy of an album in my local Oxfam on Saturday because it was the only thing of even remote interest; then, having decided against it, flipped right past 5 NM copies of the same thing in the nearest proper record store because there were hundreds of other albums I was more interested in. It's like my interest threshold is much much lower when the pickings are so slim!
     
    hamicle likes this.
  12. Bowland

    Bowland Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    A few years ago in a charity shop in Buxton (England) I found a box of absolute treasures that must have only just been put out on display. It was mainly Rolling Stones LPs from the 60s and 70s, originals and in good nick, plus a few other good late 60s/early 70s LPs. Unfortunately, I already owned every single one - but I still leafed through the box's contents eager for something I hadn't got. There were a couple of people hovering behind me dying to get to the box, and when I moved away they were in it quick as a flash.

    The box even contained a 12" single of the Stones' notorious "C********r Blues". I didn't buy any of the records, but if had I would have been embarrassed to have to take that one up to the nice old lady at the counter!

    The most ubiquitous items I see in charity shops are "Friends" DVDs; and before them "Friends" videotapes.
     
    Louise Boat and LivingForever like this.
  13. Bowland

    Bowland Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    For us British, what is an "op shop" please?
     
  14. Alexlotl

    Alexlotl Forum Resident

    Location:
    York, UK
    It's what Kiwis (and Aussies?) call Charity Shops.
     
    Louise Boat likes this.
  15. qwerty

    qwerty A resident of the SH_Forums.

    Yes, as Alexlotl put it. FYI, "op shop" is the abbreviated form of "Opportunity Shop".
     
    Louise Boat likes this.
  16. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    The cover looks horny so why not. :)
     
  17. Leepal

    Leepal Forum Resident

    Location:
    Swindon, UK
    Almost my entire vinyl collection of The Fall has been bought online (bought over the last 10 to 15 years). I hardly ever see their albums at record shops and never at charity shops.


    I know that feeling! I expect many other do too. When there is very little choice suddenly that 80s synth pop album becomes almost interesting.
     
  18. harmonica98

    harmonica98 Forum Resident

    Location:
    London, UK
    I had given up looking for vinyl in charity shops when I found myself standing next to a guy who was crate digging in one of my local shops. He came away with about a dozen rare 90s R&B albums. I felt he must have earned them!
     
  19. Harvest Your Thoughts

    Harvest Your Thoughts Forum Resident

    Location:
    On your screen
    So one can assume that you returned to the shop and gave them £149.50?
     
  20. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    I think the hours and money spent in charity shops if you find something rare, then that's your entitlement treat.
     
    eddiel likes this.
  21. Jim B.

    Jim B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    UK

    My best score was I went in one day and there were a couple of new boxes of 7" singles. I started to go through them and realised they all dated from 1979/1980 - like it belonged to some kid who had bought a load of singles during this period. It was all good stuff as well, not rare or anything, but quality stuff worth owning, lots of new wave etc.
     
  22. Alexlotl

    Alexlotl Forum Resident

    Location:
    York, UK
    This comes up a lot in this kind of thread (I also frequent videogame and boardgame forums with bargain threads), and I disagree with the sentiment. My mum has worked in charity shops for years, and while they try and spot treasures and mark them up a bit, they accept that some of what they sell is bound to be undervalued, and know that the promise of hidden bargains is key to getting people through the door. The guy who got a £150 record for 50p will be a regular return visitor, and probably buy some more records, some books, some chocolate and cards come Christmas, etc - it all adds up over the years.

    A charity shop where everything was priced at the eBay rates would be rubbish, and no-one would go there.
     
    norliss, therunner, Jim B. and 5 others like this.
  23. The Killer

    The Killer I'm Gonna Get Your Gumbo

    Location:
    UK
    I picked up an armful of country and rock n roll recently for about £1 each, the stuff was obviously all from one collection and in beautiful condition.

    Also recently Rusty Wier - Black Hat Saloon/ Stacked Deck on CD, already had it but couldn't pass it up for £1.99, it's outrageously difficult to find normally.
     
  24. JP Christian

    JP Christian Forum Resident

    I don't often sell on, but this was an album that I had bought a few years earlier before realising how rare it was - normally in these circumstances I would keep it for myself but I thought there was no harm in seeing what it would go for - and it was quite a surprise, when it sold for what it did.

    The only other time I 'flipped' was when I bought two box sets of Maria Callas - the boxes were £2.50 each and I think in the end I sold both for a total of about £75, so that was a nice find also, not something I particularly needed to hold on to.

    I don't feel particularly guilty as I have bought and donated a huge amount of vinyl and CDs from charity shops over the years - it all balances out.
     
    eddiel, Jim B. and Robert C like this.
  25. distant_light

    distant_light Active Member

    Location:
    UK
    It has been that way for a long time now - even in the early days of the internet you could go to charity shops and car boot sales and find all sorts of excellent records from The Kinks to Miles Davis to random house singles for next to nothing. People died and their relatives just got rid of everything to the latest charity shops or had a stall at car boot to flog recorcs for 50p each.

    These days? Go to a car boot and the dealers are there before it even opens, hovering and buying anything useful up to sell online at a profit. Charity shops are also combed daily by dealers, and even the shops themselves have caught on to the hipster vinyl revival and are selling all the decent records on their website for £10 a pop. All to fund the salaries of the likes of David Miliband who gets paid 300k a year to work for a 'charity' which flies its staff business class everywhere and pays salaries to a load of virtue signalling talentless idiots out of the donations of ordinary people. People who gave money on the pretence that it would be helping the needy not lining the pockets of a silver spoon 'environmental media studies' graduate...

    So yeah, charity shops are full of cheaply pressed nonesense that sold by the bucket load in the 70s and was soon discarded...it is where Ed Sheeran and Adele would be ending up in twenty years, if most of their sales were digital and could thus be disposed of without landfill. Probably the only way to get rare vinyl these days is to be in business dealing with the artefacts of the dead when their families can't be bothered.
     

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