Dismiss Notice
We are making some updates and reconfigurations to our server. Apologies for any downtime or slow forum loading now or within the next week or so. Thanks!

Was the late 90s post punk revival the last great rock movement?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by humanracer, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Ups.... you don't remember stuff you wrote? Who brought up "New Romantics, synth-pop"? And dismissed it as "farts"? Spoiler alert: One @Purple Jim, yesterday at 8:19am. My talk about Donna and Giorgio and Ralf and Florian was a reaction to that. Can we stop this now please and go back on topic?
     
    MHP likes this.
  2. cyril sneer

    cyril sneer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Exeter, UK
    I agree, landfill indie is a cringy hipster term, but in essence the term was true. Once the initial breakthrough from the likes of the white stripes, the strokes, the libertines was made, you then had a melee of bands who were not so great such as razorlight, kaiser chiefs, pigeon detectives, etc, who followed in the wake and saturated the 'scene' and made it decidely uncool.
     
    Man at C&A likes this.
  3. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Forum Resident

    Yes. No more talk about Disco, or Electronica please go back on topic
     
    Neonbeam likes this.
  4. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Well... both actually. The 2001 to 2008 period had an enormous amount of fantastic and exciting albums. Obviously most of these bands didn't reinvent the wheel and were certainly revivalists but it all seemed fresh and amazing. Even though it now seems hip to refer to it as "landfill indie" :crazy::bdance:
     
  5. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Forum Resident

    Sounds like every movement that has ever happened.
    Though truth be known I'm more likely to like some of the so called not so greats more than the designated greats.
     
    ARK likes this.
  6. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Forum Resident

    I'm pretty sure that the wheel has seldom been reinvented by a rock movement.
     
  7. Evethingandnothing

    Evethingandnothing Forum Resident

    Location:
    Devon
    I agree that some of it did seem fresh at the time, even if it wasn't a huge departure from the past. You might have to go to Japan for anything new these days.
     
  8. Purple Jim

    Purple Jim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bretagne
    Yes, that's true and it reinforces what I said about Grunge being merely a follow-on of big trends that had preceded it (which certainly wasn't the case with punk).
    I remember when I first heard Smeels Like Teen Spirit on the car radio, I imagined it to be a long hired, leather clad death metal band.

    Well they sold well in the UK but as you say, very little in the US. Aside from sales however the influence of punk was colossal and not only in music.
     
  9. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Not everything has aged well unfortunately. But I recently revisited albums by Rakes, Cribs, Fratellis (those names :whistle:) and still loved them.
     
    Man at C&A likes this.
  10. Terrapin Station

    Terrapin Station Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC Man
    For my money, nu-metal was. Plenty of great rock after nu-metal, but nu-metal is the last thing I'd describe as a "movement" that produced a lot of stuff I love. Although really I see the roots of nu-metal as going back to 80s and early 90s rap rock, funk metal, groove metal, etc., but other 90s developments I love, like technical death metal, have older roots, too, of course, as do grunge, britpop, etc.

    Re "post-punk revival," I can't say that ever seemed like a "movement" to me, but even the term "post-punk" was very foreign to me until not too long ago via the Internet. I don't recall anyone ever using the term "post-punk" for any of the relevant music at the time it was being made. The term seems to have been used more in certain locales.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
  11. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    I guess Interpol might be to blame for the "post punk" tag because I remember when "Turn On The Bright Lights" came out in 2002 that people started to use this - and Joy Division - to describe their sound. The same happened in 2003 when Franz Ferdinands "Darts Of Pleasure EP" arrived and got compared to.... errrrr.... Josef K.. Which in my opinion has more to do with their Scottish heritage than the actual sound. I love FF but I'm not hearing any Josef K. here.

    And, no, definitely not a movement because one would be hard pressed to describe similarities between.... say.... the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Or The Kooks and Interpol.
     
  12. Hatchet Jack

    Hatchet Jack Forum Resident

    Location:
    Europe
    Ok, alright, i 'll admit it: i wasn't there either! I was either at school learning useless stuff or at home playing Final Fantasy IX.

    Could those of you who were really there in the eye of the hurricane tell us how it actually was, please? Was it cool? Was it nice? Was it chill? Was it spice?
     
    Evethingandnothing likes this.
  13. carlwm

    carlwm Forum Resident

    Location:
    wales
    I agree with this.

    Prog, a genre I dearly love, has never been more exciting. Old stagers like Marillion & IQ are still making a wonderful noise and there is so much great new music being made (see Svetonio's New Prog Releases thread!), it's hard to keep up.
     
  14. Evethingandnothing

    Evethingandnothing Forum Resident

    Location:
    Devon
    I was talking about Punk Rock in the 70's. My tea had got cold by 2000. At that time I was on a bus through Alt Country.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
  15. The Modfather

    The Modfather Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Add White Lies alongside The Editors & Interpol. I always thought the likes of, fellow Scots, Franz Ferdinand belonged to the early 00’s post britpop indie scene. Certainly in the UK it was a great time for the guitar, even if they weren’t re-inventing the wheel.

    That 00’s UK scene was my time, I was 15 in 2000 so spent that whole decade at gigs and listening to that music in the clubs I liked. Bands like Arcade Fire, Bloc Party, British Sea Power, The Courteeners, The Cribs, The Doves, The Enemy, Franz Ferdinand, Jamie T, Kaiser Chiefs, Kasabian, The Long Blondes, The Maccabees, The Rakes, Reverend & The Makers (first album), The Rifles, The Ting Tings, The View, The Zutons etc etc

    Shame I’m too old and boring now to spell nightclub never mind go to one but was good reminiscing as I listed the kind of bands I’d go see on a weekly basis.

    Apologies if more of a tangent than the OP intended.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
  16. Neonbeam

    Neonbeam All Art Was Once Contemporary

    Location:
    Planet Earth
    Some of them are - or probably were - fantastic bands. I remember how the first Berlin show of The View managed to get an excited two page review in Mojo or how fantastic The Long Blondes were live. The excitement surrounding Bloc Party in the weeks before the album arrived, the reaction "Banquet" received on Berlin dancefloors that December (2004). Most of it long gone. And nowadays one has to take a repeated slagging off from a certain SHF member just because one made the "mistake" to admit to like Kasabian. Landfill indie. :crazy:
     
  17. cyril sneer

    cyril sneer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Exeter, UK
    What stood out to me from this period of time was how many bands seemed to be a debut album wonder, who then failed to deliver any other releases worthy of note.

    I'm thinking:

    The Strokes
    The Vines
    The Fratellis
    The Kooks
    The View

    As I have previously posted, i loved this period in guitar music. I was at uni in 2003 so I was about 19 or 20 years old at the time. This time for me was my first proper exploring into guitar music after growing up on late 90's ministry of sound compilations and doing the clubbing scene. It did feel like a scene as such was going on 2002 onwards. These bands were on the mainstream radio one and mtv in the uk. I also seem to remember people dressing like in the strokes with ripped denim jeans, converse trainers. Going to festivals and everyone wearing peter doherty trilby hats, etc. I haven't seen this sort of cultural impact from guitar music ever since anyway.
     
    WilliamWes, Neonbeam and zphage like this.
  18. The Modfather

    The Modfather Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Yep, I’ve often discussed whether I’d like the 00’s scene as much as I did if I wasn’t lucky enough to be in my late teens at the start of it. I’ve come to the conclusion that I would still have liked it as simply put I like that kind of music even if I accept they didn’t revolutionise anything, nor where they trying to.

    As for Kasabian, I was a big fan of their early work, less so as they’ve gone on. That first album reminds me of Oasis’ debut, Definitely Maybe. Nowhere near as good but that same kind of, “boom, we’ve arrived”. 90% of the music discussed on here isn’t for me, but I don’t see the point in slagging off other people’s tastes so wouldn’t pay those posters much attention.
     
    Neonbeam likes this.
  19. Hardiman

    Hardiman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Hartlepool
    Agree 100% I don't listen to any of these bands anymore. But growing up as a teen and young adult I needed them and I'm grateful for them. But now I need something else and I'm thankful I have jazz to keep me company. I'm sure in years to come I'll be needing something else. But maybe that music doesn't exist yet?
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
    Hatchet Jack likes this.
  20. cyril sneer

    cyril sneer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Exeter, UK
    I always felt Kasabian were harshly treated by music critics and music snobs. Yeah granted they weren't going to win any away Ivor Novello awards for creative songwriting but they delivered some great radio friendly hits and they were always fun to watch live. I remember them second on the bill at Glasto to Arctic Monkeys one year and for me they blew away Arctic Monkeys.
     
    Neonbeam likes this.
  21. bad_penny

    bad_penny Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Simple. First, I would never consider any of the bands I mentioned as "modern day punk revivalists" because they are not punk bands; however; they do carry the post punk banner quite nicely. Second, I was answering the question regarding "the last great rock movement." Aside from the initial bands listed not falling under the post punk umbrella, I listed current bands who I feel do fit that category and are going strong. To sum it up, I do not consider those bands from the late 90s to be the last great rock movement when you've got current bands carrying that torch quite nicely.
     
  22. friendofafriend

    friendofafriend Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Jordan, UT
    I’d agree with the premise of the title. I have to admit that my very favorite bands through the 2010’s, Spector and White Lies, were pretty much just keeping on with the feel of my favorite 2000’s bands like The Killers, Interpol, Franz Ferdinand, and The Editors. I’ve never cared a bit about originality in sound - if a band has a sound I like, I listen and judge them only on the quality of their songs themselves. I’m fine if you want to sound exactly like a previous band as long as you write good new songs.

    I think there were a whole lot of very good bands from the mid to late 2000’s that seem to have been mostly forgotten, such as The Rakes, Forward Russia, The Boyfriends, The Long Blondes, and Luxembourg.

    Do newer bands like Shame belong to a new rock movement or just a continuation of the post punk revival? I think Shame’s new album this month will be really great based on the pre-release tracks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
    Neonbeam and RobNeil like this.
  23. friendofafriend

    friendofafriend Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Jordan, UT
    Including The Stokes in your list makes no sense for two reasons : 1. Room On Fire is as good or better than Is This It. 2. The New Abnormal is just as good and is one of the very best albums of 2020. You can’t say that a band that’s made three great albums over a 20 year period was a flash in the pan as far as greatness is concerned.
     
  24. Vox78

    Vox78 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Cork
    The post punk indie guitar revival of 2002- 2006 was huge in the UK ... the last stand of white guys with guitars.
    Judging by various publications’ albums of the year for 2020, we won’t be hearing of too many white male guitar bands for a while.
     
  25. bad_penny

    bad_penny Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn
    This is completely subjective. I don't think The Strokes made a good record after This Is It. Room On Fire has a couple of great songs, but doesn't even come close to This Is It and The New Abnormal is awful.
     
    friendofafriend and Man at C&A like this.

Share This Page

molar-endocrine