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Was the late 90s post punk revival the last great rock movement?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by humanracer, Jan 6, 2021.

  1. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Strokes and Killers basically struck me as a fake indie rock marketed by major labels for frat guys or something. Never liked either band.
     
  2. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    The Strokes were significant to their fans.
     
    idreamofpikas likes this.
  3. Fullbug

    Fullbug Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    "post punk revival?" I must have missed that one.
     
    Big Blue and m3kcomp like this.
  4. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    What were they supposed to do for you? Take you in the backroom and give you a low lob?

    "I'd go over 12 per cent for that" --- Nice Guy Eddie
     
  5. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Maybe write and record better music?
     
    m3kcomp likes this.
  6. Evethingandnothing

    Evethingandnothing Forum Resident

    Location:
    Devon
    I'll take that first Strokes album over The Ramones. Just more to my taste.
    I like The Modern Lovers album, but hey I guess that was a sham too.
     
  7. Big Blue

    Big Blue Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I thought this was going to be about late-‘90s punk, for some reason (reading thread titles too fast, I guess...). I don’t really think of whatever you want to call the genre the Killers are as a “great movement” so much as a flavor of already-existing pop-rock music.
     
    m3kcomp likes this.
  8. Big Blue

    Big Blue Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wisconsin
    That was definitely my take on the Strokes, as someone who was deeply entrenched in actual indie (mostly punk) rock at the time. I was not impressed or interested.

    I didn’t mind the Killers as much because I didn’t really pick up on the idea that they were being sold as indie anything. They just seemed like a pop band to me, which I didn’t feel was either for me or being pushed on me. I regarded them as kind of inoffensive radio pop, and not nearly as annoying to hear as something like Maroon 5.
     
    Sear, Man at C&A and m3kcomp like this.
  9. m3kcomp

    m3kcomp Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY, NY
    The fact that you're referencing that record shows how derivative the Strokes were from the outset.

    Regardless of the snark, The Modern Lovers were infinitely more significant that the Strokes ever were. Hundreds of bands were.

    I'm not arguing for or against specific records' worth. I'm arguing against a manufactured history that isn't accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
  10. Evethingandnothing

    Evethingandnothing Forum Resident

    Location:
    Devon
    No, the point was that The Modern Lovers record is derivative......if you wanna look at things in that way. But hey ho, it's also a seminal record of the punk era, even though it was recorded much earlier.
    Personally, if I like it I like it. I know lots of people who bought The Strokes album. I have no idea about any manufactured history.
     
    m3kcomp likes this.
  11. jackfruits

    jackfruits Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    I'm surprised to see The Yeah Yeah Yeahs hasn't been mentioned. Fever to Tell had a significant influence on indie and mainstream pop. The '00s garage revival (manufactured or not), and more specifically dance punk certainly wasn't tied to any social or generational movement and its influence is understated and show up in random places eg. Beyonce's Lemonade.
     
    Django likes this.
  12. m3kcomp

    m3kcomp Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY, NY
    No one has mentioned the Liars, either...who made some fine records. A few I still listen to.

    None of this adds up to "the last great rock movement."
     
  13. cloneofkane

    cloneofkane Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Sorry if these were already mentioned, but extensions of the White Stripes were/are pretty darn tasty, so well-past the 90's: Raconteurs, Dead Weather, and by association, The Kills. I'll take all three over Jack's solo stuff, and all three are/were pretty rocking, although The Kills could be considered more pop-ish with electronic beats. I love her (Allison Mosshart) though, and would consider her as having a punk soul akin to Kim Gordon, Exene, Chrissie Hynde, etc.
     
  14. Tristero

    Tristero Touching from a distance

    Location:
    MI
    Sure, but you could say that about any band with a devoted following. The question is, did they impact the broader scene in important ways? Did they influence other bands to follow a similar aesthetic? I honestly don't know the answer to this, so I'm not trying to pass judgement.
     
    m3kcomp likes this.
  15. Django

    Django Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dublin, Ireland
    In hindsight every scene is a bit underwhelming, but I like loads of bands from the time. It looks like a golden age compared to now.

     
  16. Tristero

    Tristero Touching from a distance

    Location:
    MI
    I liked these guys for a while, they checked the right boxes for me stylistically, but they haven't really stuck with me in the same way that the great post-punk bands have.
     
  17. dmiller458

    dmiller458 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Midland, Michigan
    Yes, you are.
     
  18. Tristero

    Tristero Touching from a distance

    Location:
    MI
    No, I'm asking the question. If someone wants to tell me about all the bands that they influenced, I'll listen.
     
  19. idreamofpikas

    idreamofpikas Forum Resident

    Location:
    england
    They still are. Their current album is one of the best received of the year, two decades into their career.

    The New Abnormal - Wikipedia

    It seems so odd to see them lumped in with many other artists who quickly faded into obscurity, while the Strokes and Julian Casablancas, have been one of the few success stories of 21st century rock.
     
  20. idreamofpikas

    idreamofpikas Forum Resident

    Location:
    england
    Tristero likes this.
  21. Tristero

    Tristero Touching from a distance

    Location:
    MI
    This is a bit of an exaggeration. This album scored a 75 on Metacritic, which is solid but not outstanding. There are dozens of albums that surpassed it in 2020. You need to get up well over 80 to be considered one of the most acclaimed albums of the year.
     
  22. cyril sneer

    cyril sneer Forum Resident

    Location:
    Exeter, UK
    I dunno, at the time it sort of felt like to me that Kaiser Chiefs hyjacked the sort of scene that had materialised previous and made it all poppy with their, as you quite rightly note, awful lyrics. You could say Franz Ferdinand's put a poppy sound on The Libertines sound before Kaiser Chiefs, but least Franz Ferdinand had better lyrics than Kaiser Chiefs. Anyway Franz Ferdinand and Kaiser Chiefs were certainly a second wave to this scene from the initial White Stripes, Strokes, and Libertines breakthrough. To me the real scene was 2001-2004.
     
    Man at C&A likes this.
  23. bad_penny

    bad_penny Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Hence the word seminal.
     
    m3kcomp likes this.
  24. RudolphS

    RudolphS Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro
    The Strokes were a clear influence on The Libertines, who in their turn inspired a truckload of british guitar bands, including Arctic Monkeys and many others already listed in this thread.
    For the record, The Strokes were not a strict post-punk clone at all, nor did their music sound like mid-'60s garage rock. They played energetic indie rock, and happened to emerge a the right place and right time.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2021
    cyril sneer likes this.
  25. Parachute Woman

    Parachute Woman Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    In response to Tristero:
    The Strokes were a significant influence on Arctic Monkeys. Their last album literally begins with the lyric, "I just wanted to be one of the Strokes." They were also an obvious influence on Car Seat Headrest and Franz Ferdinand and many others I'm sure.

    The National also mentioned the Strokes on their last album. "The sequel was incredible / Like The Godfathers or the first two Strokes." This in reference to the Strokes' first two albums, two of the most significant records of my life, if that matters.

    In response to the whole, lousy thread:
    I wasn't going to comment in here because honestly, I hate this thread and everything it stands for. I am deeply saddened by these threads (and the responses in them) that crop up over and over again, determined to dismiss and belittle music that means a great deal to me and to my entire generation.

    The rock scene was dead in the mainstream in 2000. It was dead. Limp Bizkit was one of the most popular bands in the world. It was horrific, violent, misogynistic, bone-headed, poorly written, Neanderthal crap. I loved music and I craved rock music and that which was on offer was literally offensive to me.

    I cannot overstate how important it was to me (and many other people my age) to have a wave of great and exciting rock music in the mainstream in 2001. I'm sorry I wasn't some hip adult living in an urban setting who had seen it all before. I was a 13 year old kid (a girl no less) living in American suburbia. The mainstream was what I knew and what I had access to. It was important to have great bands like the White Stripes and the Strokes on the radio, on MTV, where I could see and hear them.

    Before you flippantly post "they suck"... They didn't. I don't care if you like them. I loved them. I still do. They had great songs and great sounds. They were cool and different. It wasn't violent and aggressive bro **** I hated and could not relate to in any way. It was Meg White pounding on the drums and showing me a girl who rocked. It was Albert Hammond Jr. wearing his guitar up high like the 60s and looking so damn cool. It was music that mattered to a young teenager just developing her tastes and has kept mattering to me as an adult.

    I don't care if you think they were derivative of some music or other that you loved from your youth. Do you not understand that there are generations that came after you? Do you think a 13 year old in 2001 had any conception of the Modern Lovers? Who cares about that when you're 13? You need music of your own time and we got it.

    And those songs were new. That spirit was new. I don't think the Strokes sound like anyone but the Strokes. They don't sound like Television, so don't tell me they do. Deadpan, disaffected crooned vocals over hypnotic drums and chiming, repetitive duel guitars is the Strokes sound and that was their sound with great songs and turn of the millennium attitude and concerns.

    I swear people on this forum can't see past their own life experiences. If something wasn't significant to you, that doesn't mean it was worthless and you can mock and look down on those who did love it (I've seen that in this thread too).

    I was born in 1988 and I love music. Do you know how disheartening it is to see people on this forum state that all the music released in my entire lifetime is worthless, derivative garbage? That the music that defined and soundtracked my life means nothing and that it "sucks"?

    You know what sucks? That.
     

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