What Are Some Affordable but Efficient & Worthwile Graphic Equalizers

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by AcidPunk15, Oct 16, 2018.

  1. AcidPunk15

    AcidPunk15 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Austin TX
    I am looking to buy my first Graphic Equalizer. What are some trusted brands that made or make Graphic Equalizer? Companies that built equipment that can last a lifetime. Needs a little repair. If any repairs must be done. I will have to be able to complete them at home. Spare parts don’t cost more than the equalizer. Is there any features I should be looking for. I’m looking to add more bass and to hear the drums better (Rhythm Section). I’m not trying to spend a boatload of money. I don’t mind spending $100 if I could find a steel that will last me a long time. Any advice for first-time graphics equalizer buyers. What are some models that usually come up for a relatively cheap price but is very good first-time graphics equalizer? I don’t really care if it looks ugly or doesn’t match my system. As long as it gets the job done it doesn’t really matter me. I am assuming the more Frequency band the better the Equalizer. Is a Parametric Equalizers necessary for a Novice "Audiophile".
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2018
  2. Spin Doctor

    Spin Doctor Forum Resident

    Most of the folks around here are not into equalizers. I imagine there are a few out there still being made, but for the most part they will make the sound worse overall. If you have a terrible system to start with, then they may help.
     
  3. Bill Hart

    Bill Hart Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    Go visit the guys at the Sound Gallery in Austin and see if they have anything used and cheap that you could try (buying but able to return if you don't like it). Use some decent RCA cables- nothing fancy, but I'd avoid the cheapie give away molded plastic jobs.
    Most of us were schooled in the old days that tone controls and equalizers caused more problems than they fixed. I know some folks who use very high quality ones but they are quite costly. BTW, the guy at the Sound Gallery who I usually talk to is, wait for it:

    Robert Johnson.

    Have fun. They have a lot of cast-offs from yesteryear that are relatively cheap.
     
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  4. Billion$Baby

    Billion$Baby RIAA AWARD COLLECTORS on Facebook

    Equalizers are essential with setups from the 1970's/80's. Are you using Vintage receivers or modern day stuff? If your using Vintage gear I would highly recommend Pioneer SG-9800. Will run you $200-300 for one in nice shape. Easy to find on EBAY and you might ask around on the AudioKarma website. They certainly don't make the system sound worse nor do tone controls on modern day equipment like $15,000 Luxman amps.
     
  5. The Pinhead

    The Pinhead SLEAZY SOUTHAMERICAN CAVEMAN

  6. 33na3rd

    33na3rd Forum Resident

    Location:
    SW Washington, USA
  7. ti-triodes

    ti-triodes Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    +1 on the Loki. I have one and it’s a wonderful little unit.
     
  8. AcidPunk15

    AcidPunk15 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Austin TX
    I was looking for a Equalizer from the 80s-90s something in the $50-$100 Range. Will this not buy me anything worth while.
     
  9. Bill Hart

    Bill Hart Forum Resident

    Location:
    Austin
    You might find something that was used for live sound, beat and not necessarily low noise. That's why I suggested you visit the guys at that shop I mentioned. You are in Austin according to your avatar, right?
     
  10. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    Choose low price or quality. Really quality equalizers are not cheap, they never were.
     
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  11. theron d

    theron d Forum Resident

    Location:
    Baltimore MD
    agree not bad at all!
     
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  12. The Pinhead

    The Pinhead SLEAZY SOUTHAMERICAN CAVEMAN

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  13. Brian Barker

    Brian Barker Forum Resident

    Check out some thrift stores in your area, with some luck you should be able to find a decent one there, and you can see if it affects the music the way you want. In my opinion, equalizers aren't really necessary. I got a graphic equalizer in the 80's and it worked fine for the system I had at the time, but after getting a better receiver that had an integrated parametric I took it out of the chain. I tried it again a few years ago in my house and it just wasn't needed at the time. The catch is that you can increase the bass response, but you also have to increase the frequencies around it as well or else it'll sound bad. If you go to the thrifts, maybe you'll get extra lucky and find a sub woofer. I snagged one at a Goodwill near me for $10.00 just a couple of weeks ago.
     
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  14. McLover

    McLover Forum Resident

    Location:
    East TN
    The Schitt Loki is the best you can buy for anywhere near the price or even multiples. A good, very useful EQ, and this one is truly worth the outlay!
     
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  15. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    Yes.

    Old school is good school in this regard.

    It will not buy you anything worth while.

    The beast graphic EQ you can buy is no graphic EQ.

    Simply put.

    Buy a Parametric Equalizer or NOTHING!

    Adding cheap crap to your system is not doing yourself any favors.
     
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  16. allied333

    allied333 TUBE AMPLIFIER REBUILDER - inquire

    Location:
    Fenton, MI
    Careful. Most equalizers trashes the sound.
     
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  17. The Pinhead

    The Pinhead SLEAZY SOUTHAMERICAN CAVEMAN

    Nothing personal against anybody of course and I'm sorry to disagree with all of the above statements. MAYBE, if you owned a super hi-end rig. But hey, boosting the 32 hz band alone will barely affect the rest of the spectrum. Plus, shaving off some harshness at 1-2 or 4 khz, or boosting the 16 khz band a little to give the cymbals some air won't ¨trash¨ the overall sound; affect a little, yeah, ¨trash¨it, hell no. Sure it will affect other frequencies but it's the overall result pleasing the listener what counts, not super-faithful, super-accurate, true-to-source, surgical sound. FFS, the OP's handle is AcidPunk, do you think he listens to Miles Davis ? I don't think so. Cut him some slack. It will help him fix (or at least palliate) a lot of the awfully-recorded stuff around.

    Kid; get the Behringer I linked you to from Amazon and you won't regret it. Total control for under a hunnert with no harm to the sound. Just don't overdo it.
     
  18. head_unit

    head_unit Forum Resident

    Location:
    Los Angeles CA USA
    What do you want to use it FOR? That is my question...which also affects if graphic is OK, or parametric. Or maybe something like Audyssey/Dirac (which are built into receivers)
     
  19. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    OK, since you are offering your considerable guidance and expertise. There are very few things as pitiful as a newbie and his first graphical EQ (knowledge from personal experience and shame).

    The OP's handle is "AcidPunk", "Cut him some slack", you have a point here.

    I do like Behringer stuff. It really is surprisingly good for the money, by a long shot. Their stuff works, does what it is supposed to do and it is hard to beat for the buck.

    I have a couple of Behringer thingies in the portable audio rack with the Crown amps, behind the TV.

    :cool:
     
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  20. AcidPunk15

    AcidPunk15 Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Austin TX
    My understanding is an equalizer is like mixing board for one's stereo system. You choose which frequencies to increase or decrease. i would want to increase the bass. and increase the frequency band responsible for drum sound.
     
  21. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    Beringer, which The Pinhead recommended, makes some good products, and this might work for you.

    The problem with most of the inexpensive graphic EQ's are simply that they are pure crap. The moment that you plug one in your circuit, the noise floor goes up and then it gets worse from there when you start moving the slider's.

    The problem with a graphic style EQ is that you can't just punch up one instrument, withing effecting all of the others.

    My main advice, stay away from the midrange. Add a bit more lower bass if you like. Kick things up above 12-14k, tame things a few dB's between 2-4k, otherwise leave everything else alone, least you throw everything else "off kilter".
     
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  22. The Pinhead

    The Pinhead SLEAZY SOUTHAMERICAN CAVEMAN

    EXACTLY how I use it, in tiny db increments, with exceptions; Slipknot's ¨Iowa¨ suffers from muffled guitars. I hated it when it came out. But it was clear from their first DVD the guitars were intended to shred bigtime. So I gave it another listen with the 4 khz slider up 1.5 db. It worked like a charm. I never use smiley curves.
     
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  23. Chris Schoen

    Chris Schoen Forum Resident

    Location:
    Maryland, U.S.A.
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  24. SandAndGlass

    SandAndGlass Twilight Forum Resident

    There are two main practical uses for equalization. to balance out a system and the room.

    And, like @The Pinhead has said, to correct the deficiencies of any particular source, meaning album or song, as he mentioned.
     
  25. ti-triodes

    ti-triodes Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC

    I hope it’s selling well enough for Schiit to consider a 7 band EQ in the future. :)
     
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