What are you watching on the Criterion Channel?

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Electric, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. SmallDarkCloud

    SmallDarkCloud Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    This one is another favorite of mine. You can see how the film inspired Guillermo del Toro, particularly on Pan's Labyrinth.
     
  2. Jeff Yerkey

    Jeff Yerkey Any Format You Like

    That’s a good recommendation, Brad. Thanks!
     
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  3. ~dave~~wave~

    ~dave~~wave~ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lincoln, NE
    The death of Jane Birkin announced today:
    Jane Birkin, actor and singer, dies aged 76

    The search function brings up the collections for La Piscine (1969), which I remember, and this one, which I need to watch with the extras from the collection:

    Jane B. par Agnès V.
    Directed by Agnès Varda • 1988 • France
    Starring Jane Birkin, Agnès Varda, Charlotte Gainsbourg

    The interests, obsessions, and fantasies of two singular artists converge in this inspired collaboration between Agnès Varda and her longtime friend the actor Jane Birkin. Made over the course of a year and motivated by Birkin’s fortieth birthday—a milestone she admits to some anxiety over—JANE B. PAR AGNÈS V. contrasts the private, reflective Birkin with Birkin the icon, as Varda casts her variously as a classical muse, a femme fatale, a Spanish dancer, Joan of Arc, and even a deadpan Laurel opposite a clownish Hardy in a fanciful slapstick spoof. Made in the spirit of pure, uninhibited play, this free-flowing dual portrait unfolds as a shared reverie between two women as they collapse the boundaries between artist and subject.
     
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  4. misterjones

    misterjones Smarter than the average bear.

    Location:
    New York, NY
    I'll have to check this out (literally, from the local library, I hope*). I have seen several "live" Pinter plays (including The Homecoming, his best, twice). It's BFI and not Criterion, but I just bought Pinter at the BBC (region 2, 5 DVDs). Looking forward to that.
    ___________
    * Just checked. No dice. :cry: :thumbsdow
     
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  5. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    This is really well done, IMO. I'll have to compare it to the 2023 Oppenheimer film.

    The Day After Trinity
    Directed by Jon Else • 1981 • United States
    Starring Paul Frees, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Hans Bethe

    This essential, Academy Award–nominated documentary offers an urgent warning from history about the dangers of nuclear warfare via the story of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the enigmatic physicist and all-around Renaissance man who led the Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb that America unleashed on Japan in the final days of World War II. Through extensive interviews and archival footage, THE DAY AFTER TRINITY traces Oppenheimer’s evolution, from architect of one of the most consequential endeavors of the twentieth century to an outspoken opponent of nuclear proliferation who came to deeply regret his role in ushering in the perils of the atomic age.
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  6. ~dave~~wave~

    ~dave~~wave~ Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lincoln, NE
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  7. DigMyGroove

    DigMyGroove Forum Resident

    I’m thrilled they’ve offered the Hal Hartley films this month. I’ve seen most of the early films starting back when they were first released. But over the years it became much harder to see his movies in theaters or to track them down elsewhere. Very happy to have this chance to view them all. I started tonight with No Such Thing from 2001 starring Sarah Polley and Robert John Burke. I quite liked this very odd beauty and the beast tale.

    This evening I screened Spike Lee’s 1989 Do the Right Thing for my 16 year old. She liked it a lot, and this New Yorker father had to explain a lot about racial tensions in NYC in the 1980s and how the tragic event seen at the close of the film still frequently occurs today, 34 years later.
     
  8. proedros

    proedros Forum Resident

    Location:
    Athens , Greece
    the soundtrack is fantastic , people who like ambient music should check it out
     
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  9. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    Not bad. Takes it time.

    Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
    Directed by Michael Cimino • 1974 • United States
    Starring Clint Eastwood, Jeff Bridges, Geoffrey Lewis

    Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges are a pair of modern-day outlaws in this bold, tough, and witty crime thriller, the feature debut from director Michael Cimino (THE DEER HUNTER). Thunderbolt (Eastwood) is a former thief whose razor-sharp wits and steely nerves made him a master of his profession, but he’s about to reenter the criminal world with a new partner: Lightfoot (Bridges), a brash young drifter whose energy and exuberance give the veteran a new outlook on life and their target—the seemingly impenetrable Montana Armored Depository.
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    Well done!

    The Blue Caftan
    Directed by Maryam Touzani • 2022 • France, Morocco
    Starring Lubna Azabal, Saleh Bakri, Ayoub Messioui

    With her stirring and sensitive second feature, Moroccan writer-director Maryam Touzani (ADAM) weaves a richly emotional tapestry of love, forbidden desire, and compassion that’s as beautifully wrought as the luxuriant fabrics that fill its sensuous frames. Tailor Halim (Saleh Bakri) and his wife, Mina (Lubna Azabal), run a traditional caftan store in one of Morocco’s oldest medinas. In order to keep up with the requests of the demanding customers, they hire Youssef (Ayoub Missioui). The talented apprentice shows an utmost dedication in learning the art of embroidery and tailoring from Halim. Slowly Mina realizes how much her husband is moved by the presence of the young man, and a delicate push-pull between three hearts ensues.
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  11. Joe Stewart

    Joe Stewart Forum Resident

    Location:
    Florida
    I've been watching some of the Hal Hartley films and love them. I had never seen any of these. I watched the Henry Fool trilogy films and Trust. I watched Ned Rifle first not realizing it was part of a trilogy but I thought it was really good and it led me to the other two. I plan on watching as many of the others as I can. Great characters and dialog and they are very well done considering the very low budgets these movies must have.
     
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  12. DigMyGroove

    DigMyGroove Forum Resident

    Be sure not to miss Amateur and Trust!
     
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  13. palisantrancho

    palisantrancho Forum Resident

    First time seeing this one. I thought I tried watching it years ago and didn't care for it. I was wrong. I don't recall seeing it before and I loved it. It's the only Argento film playing on Criterion, but I have gone on to watch Deep Red, The Bird With The Crystal Plumage, and Tenebre in the last couple of days. I still think Suspiria is the best, but Deep Red comes close. I will probably watch a few more Argento films this week. They can be a bit much for some people, but I'm enjoying his style of filmmaking.

    Suspiria

    Directed by Dario Argento • 1977 • Italy
    Starring Jessica Harper, Stefania Casini, Flavio Bucci

    One of cinema’s most potent hallucinogens, Dario Argento’s witchy freak-out is a sustained spectacle of outrageously stylized violence and eye-popping art direction. When doe-eyed American ballerina Suzy Bannion (Jessica Harper) arrives in Germany to study at a renowned dance academy, she stumbles through the looking glass into a maze of mayhem, murder, and maggots. It all takes place in one of film history’s most outlandish haunted houses: a riot of demonic neon lighting and surrealist-baroque décor complete with a barbed-wire room. Add the eardrum-shattering score by prog-occultists Goblin and you’ve got the most extravagant slasher movie of all time.
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  14. SmallDarkCloud

    SmallDarkCloud Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    I'm a big fan of Argento's Inferno, which doesn't get enough love. It is the only film Argento made for a Hollywood studio (Fox), after Suspiria became a surprise hit in the U.S. (with 20th Century Fox's distribution). I kind of like it even more than Suspiria and Deep Red, and I love those. It goes without saying, I guess, that Disney owns Inferno now, so, yes, the Mouse owns a Dario Argento film.
     
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  15. Jerry

    Jerry Grateful Gort Staff

    Location:
    New England
    Mona Lisa. (1986) Hand Made Films.
     
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  16. palisantrancho

    palisantrancho Forum Resident

    Really enjoyed Inferno. A great looking film. Definitely recommended for anyone that likes the style of Suspiria.
     
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  17. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    Part way through this now. A film made by Handmade Films (George Harrison) in 1986. Very good but you can see how budget conscious they must have been when every time the main character turns on the radio it's Nat King Cole singing the same couple of songs. Also 1 track by Genesis, a song and a band I'm not really a fan of. Well worth watching, IMO.

    Mona Lisa
    Directed by Neil Jordan • 1986 • United Kingdom
    Starring Bob Hoskins, Cathy Tyson, Michael Caine

    The brilliant breakthrough film by writer-director Neil Jordan journeys into the dark heart of the London underworld to weave a gripping, noir-infused love story. Bob Hoskins received a multitude of honors—including an Oscar nomination—for his touchingly vulnerable, not-so-tough-guy portrayal of George, recently released from prison and hired by a sinister mob boss (Michael Caine) to chauffeur call girl Simone (Cathy Tyson, in a celebrated performance) between high-paying clients. George’s fascination with the elegant, enigmatic Simone leads him on a dangerous quest through the city’s underbelly, where love is a weakness to be exploited and betrayed. Jordan’s colorful dialogue and eye for evocatively surreal details lend a dreamlike sheen to MONA LISA, an unconventionally romantic tale of damaged people searching for tenderness in an unforgiving world.
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  18. Looking For Today

    Looking For Today The Crowded Future Stings My Eyes

    Location:
    California
    Try Four Flies On Grey Velvet if you haven’t already. One of my faves.
     
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  19. Looking For Today

    Looking For Today The Crowded Future Stings My Eyes

    Location:
    California
    That DVD set is pretty good. A lot of great Pinter has floating about on YouTube over the years like No Mans Land the 1978 one with Richardson and Gielgud and Party Time. My fave is The Lover :

     
  20. AintGotHalfOf

    AintGotHalfOf Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York
  21. Not available outside the United States, alas. A frequent problem with these thematic collections.
     
  22. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    They must have just recently removed it. I watched it last month and I'm in BC.
     
  23. Electric

    Electric The Medium is the Massage Thread Starter

    This is really interesting:

    Lynch/Oz
    Directed by Alexandre O. Philippe • 2022 • United States
    Starring John Waters, Karyn Kusama, Justin Benson

    The themes, images, and cultural vernacular of Victor Fleming’s THE WIZARD OF OZ continue to haunt David Lynch’s art and filmography—from his very first short, SIX MEN GETTING SICK, to his latest series, TWIN PEAKS: THE RETURN. Arguably, no filmmaker has so consistently drawn inspiration—consciously or unconsciously—from a single work. Is David Lynch trapped in the land of Oz? If so, can we derive a new appreciation for Lynch’s body of work from taking a closer look at how it intersects and communicates with THE WIZARD OF OZ? In turn, do MULHOLLAND DR., LOST HIGHWAY, and THE ELEPHANT MAN have something to say about the enduring resonance of one of America’s most beloved classic movies? Viewed through six distinct perspectives and narrated by some of contemporary cinema’s most exciting voices, LYNCH/OZ will take us down the proverbial rabbit hole, help us re-experience and reinterpret THE WIZARD OF OZ by way of David Lynch, and deliver a whole new appreciation for Lynch’s symbolism through the lens of his greatest influence.

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  24. Phantom Of The Paradise (1974): While occasionally a bit too broad and cheesy in that particularly ’70s manner, this early Brian de Palma film is overall a fun, deliriously OTT riff on rock grandiosity. It takes Phantom of the Opera, Faust, and The Picture of Dorian Gray, mashes them together, and drags them through Rock Dreams and Alice Cooper. If you’ve had a couple of drinks and/or tokes on a Friday night and are in a silly mood, this should hit the spot. 8/10.
     
  25. palisantrancho

    palisantrancho Forum Resident

    Watched it about a week ago. I agree with you. De Palma can get pretty wild, but his earlier films are usually entertaining. Sisters is great if you haven't seen that one.
     

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