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Who originated this style of singing?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by RickH, Nov 21, 2020 at 12:53 PM.

  1. Man at C&A

    Man at C&A Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    Speak for yourself! :)

    I'm a bitter middle aged fart!
     
  2. Glennza

    Glennza Londoner, lost in the back of beyond

    I think the first time I heard an LGV (little girl voice) song was in the Scandi-Noir series Wallander

     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020 at 6:25 PM
  3. Glennza

    Glennza Londoner, lost in the back of beyond

    And then in just about every other Scandinavian crime drama made since then!



    Although I do actually think these are quite good!
     
  4. Glennza

    Glennza Londoner, lost in the back of beyond

    Unusually, here's a bloke doing it!



    Starting to see a pattern?
     
    Eric_Generic likes this.
  5. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    There's nothing really wrong with the style, or the intent....if it's executed well, and has some sort of personality or memorable twist to it. The problem is, too many artists automatically assume that stripping the sound down to them and an acosutic backdrop, while delivering the song with an unaffected affectation is all that's needed.

    Same for those who believe that kind of music is somehow more authentic than others. Authenticity did for popular music in the 90s. Everything was going quite well until then.

    EG.
     
    Sear, BSU and Chris from Chicago like this.
  6. Dillydipper

    Dillydipper Sultan Of Snark

    Location:
    Central PA
    My first thought was Macy Gray.
     
  7. ashiya

    ashiya Well-Known Member

    Location:
    melbourne
    What you mean press the mute button on every other TV advert?
     
    Mechanical Man and Spaghettiows like this.
  8. Dillydipper

    Dillydipper Sultan Of Snark

    Location:
    Central PA
    Interesting take. How did you react to Aurora's cover of "Half The World Away", from two years later?
     
  9. ashiya

    ashiya Well-Known Member

    Location:
    melbourne
    This has really been bugging me for well over a decade and is one of the main reasons I simply don't bother much with new music.

    Like Steve, the earliest popular example I could ever think of was Rickie Lee Jones, but at the time at least it seemed "individual" because every other singer-songwriter in the 70s had their own voice . In the late 80s/early 90s indie scene there were quite a few more with the breathy, occasionally slightly strangulated style, like the Sugarcubes, Sundays, Cardigans etc., then Cat Power, although still there was a (dwindling) sense of individuality and authenticity.

    Then by this century that indie style coupled with a Billie Holiday tinge had become the generic female vocal - the likes of Norah jones, Amy Winehouse (although maybe Amy gets a pass because at least she was instantly recognisable), with the trend exacerbated by TV talent shows in which it was enough to sound like a pop star, rather than have any real soul in your singing. Now with every other TV ad and nearly every busker, you hear this same vocal.
     
  10. drad dog

    drad dog Forum Resident

    Location:
    New England
    It's a contradiction. That's what gets on people's nerves.
     
    bluejimbop and BluesOvertookMe like this.
  11. Mylene

    Mylene Senior Member



    Angie Hart from frente was pretty early in the little girl voiced indie girl genre.
     
  12. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    Precisely.

    EG.
     
    ashiya likes this.
  13. ashiya

    ashiya Well-Known Member

    Location:
    melbourne
    Bit of an unusual thread for this forum in that I can hardly bring myself to click on any of the youtube vids!
     
    Sear likes this.
  14. egebamyasi

    egebamyasi Forum Resident

    Location:
    Worcester, MA
    I'm pretty sure it was Darla.
     
  15. Geee!

    Geee! Senior Member

    Grinding all new music to a halt in 1975 would have solved so much Hoffmanite despair.
    Edit: with the exception of McCartney, naturally.
     
  16. coot

    coot Forum Resident

    I may be off base but it reminds of this gal...:shh:



     
  17. Sneaky Pete

    Sneaky Pete Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC USA
    They sound like Conner Oberst on estrogen.

    I don’t know where it’s coming from but some of them are OK others are too mannered and self-conscious for my tastes. I applaud them for writing original tunes and performing them without a lot of technological trickery and effects.
     
  18. Chris from Chicago

    Chris from Chicago Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes

    Not exactly my cup of tea. But...sounds fine to me. A little variety here and there. A little personality. It's all fine. You're supposed to stamp your own identity into what you do. Some of it will connect with me. Some of it won't.

    Would it really be better if there wasn't a stylistic choice at the vocal buffet?
     
  19. ashiya

    ashiya Well-Known Member

    Location:
    melbourne
    Much of the annoyance is precisely that it is generic. Folk singers in the past, listen to Joni Mitchell, Sandy Denny, Jacqui McShee, Judy Collins, Bonnie Dobson, sound anything but typical.
     
  20. drad dog

    drad dog Forum Resident

    Location:
    New England
    It's not a neutral stylistic choice. Singers can choose to be affected and audiences can choose to make fun of it.

    I don't want to stamp it out. But without criticism they won't get better.
     
  21. bkbk

    bkbk Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville, TN
  22. KaNuckles

    KaNuckles Well-Known Member

    Location:
    USA
  23. Thievius

    Thievius This is my sweet custom title, yo

    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    Its not the style per se that bothers me, its the unoriginality of (seemingly) so many artists that appear to ape it. And yes it permeates TV advertising and quickly becomes irksome. But if you're into it, knock yourselves out. Its nothing I have any interest in listening to, however.
     
    Eric_Generic and Sear like this.
  24. LilacTeardrop

    LilacTeardrop "Roll It Over, My Soul...and Leave Me Here"

    Location:
    U.S.
    I just thought this is how Lana Del Rey sings & I'm not a fan; never thought of it as a thing & don't agree w/many of the other selections. Maybe my ears aren't as discerning, or I am merely fully engaged when I listen & not picking apart & dissecting. I listen to Norah Jones, Ricki Lee Jones, Regina Spektor & Cocteau Twins & never would have thought to bundle them all together nor seque from 1 to another.
    I think maybe Hope Sandoval, who I also listen to occasionally (& also don't seque in w/the others' above) might be mentioned in this, as well, if it's mainly whispery, breathy, little-girl voiced vocals.
    I think she belongs more than some of others posted & if that is the criteria, I think she owns it; but the "originator" might be Francois Hardy &/or Brigitte Bardot.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ulq_jb7MhT0 - Francois Hardy
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LgQcslGtbQ - Brigitte Bardot

    :shrug:
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2020 at 1:25 AM
    speedracer likes this.
  25. Rosskolnikov

    Rosskolnikov Designated Cloud Yeller

    It's not just that. In the example posted by the thread originator, the singer was so blatantly out of tune in multiple spots that it was just intolerable.
     

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