Why are the Early 60's so Disliked?

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by bosskeenneat, Feb 6, 2015.

  1. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    Except that it didn't.
     
    sixelsix likes this.
  2. zphage

    zphage inappropriately touching the out of touch

    Oops I love Del, Roy, Dion, Everlies, Ray, etc., I was reacting to the Four Seasons, Ricky, etc.,
     
    ralphb likes this.
  3. ralphb

    ralphb "First they came for..."

    Location:
    Brooklyn, New York
    I sort of figured you didn't mean everybody. We'll have to agree to disagree about the Four Seasons and Ricky Nelson.
     
    zphage and seed_drill like this.
  4. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    There was also a more deliberate targeting to a juvenile market than a lot of the "dangerous" 50's rock and roll or the 60's and later rock. And I would include early Beatles in this. Of course targeting continued to exist, but it didn't dominate the way it did in the "producer" era. In the early 60s college kids tended to gravitate towards folk or jazz, but from '64 or '65 on there was rock for young adults alongside the stuff for kids.
     
    Grant likes this.
  5. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    Well, technically he's right about Little Eva . . .
     
  6. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    I don't remember who it was, but one of the artists expressed their horror at having to drive past sharecroppers picking cotton to get to the studio. This was still the segregated South at the time.
     
  7. Tim S

    Tim S Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Tennessee
    I THINK that was Wilson Pickett. I seem to remember an interview with him where he landed at a small airport near the studio and on the way there looked out on the fields and asked "Is that what I think it is?"

    That sounds like the incident you are referring to.
     
    goodiesguy, seed_drill and sixelsix like this.
  8. sixelsix

    sixelsix Forum Resident

    Location:
    memphis, tn, usa
    Dick Dale, Link Wray and Lonnie Mack also, I reckon.
     
  9. sixelsix

    sixelsix Forum Resident

    Location:
    memphis, tn, usa
    Ricky Nelson was great! Plus he had James Burton on guitar, probably one of the five greatest Tele players ever.
     
  10. zphage

    zphage inappropriately touching the out of touch

    Yeah, It was funny that Wilson was scared of what he feared the south and southerns would be, and they were equally sacred of him being his 'badassness' and it worked out fine, particularly with that hippy kid Duane who was sleeping in a tent in the parking lot. great stuff.
     
    Grant and seed_drill like this.
  11. zphage

    zphage inappropriately touching the out of touch

    Who also presided over Elvis' glorious 70s;), one could see a conspiracy...
     
    sixelsix likes this.
  12. ehtoo

    ehtoo Forum Resident

    Everybody was named Bobby.
     
  13. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    Yeah, it was either in the Time-Life or PBS hustory of Rock serieses.
     
  14. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    That's interesting you mentioned Elvis Presley, because his broad appeal diminished in the early 60s. By 1963, he was already becoming a has-been, and started doing bad movies and Las Vegas.

    Ray Charles' impact also decreased in the 60s. By 1964, he was doing lounge shows. ABC/Paramount Records may have scored big with him because of his "Modern Sounds In Country and Western" albums, but his hit days were basically over.

    If you look at James Brown, his broad appeal only increased.

    If Sam Cooke hadn't been murdered, who knows where he would have been today.
     
  15. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    I don't know if the horn player was making passes at Aretha, but it definately did got racial with her husband, and it eventually involved Jerry Wexler and Rick Hall. IIRC, they fired the horn player, and Wexler never sent Aretha Franklin back there. He flew the Swampers up to NYC for sessions. Good thing they accepted! Those guys, plus Duane Allman and Bobby Womack created a hell of a backing band!
     
  16. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    That was Wilson Pickett.

    When Jerry Wexler and Jim Stewart (owner of Stax Records) had a falling out over Sam & Dave, Wexler decided to send all of his artists to Fame.

    The first Atlantic side cut at Fame was "Land of 1000 Dances" by Wilson Pickett.

    Sam & Dave continued to cut at Stax, however, even though they were always signed to Atlantic.
     
    seed_drill likes this.
  17. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States

    Don't forget guys like Dan Penn!

    The good thing is that the townspeople of Muscle Shoals left them all alone.
     
    sixelsix and zphage like this.
  18. seed_drill

    seed_drill Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tryon, NC, USA
    Ben E. King said that James Brown's appeal was too black to be negatively effected by the changes in the pop marketplace caused by The Beatles and the British Invasion.
     
    Grant likes this.
  19. eddiel

    eddiel Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    How did it get racial with her husband? Don't remember the story beyond what I posted.

    Yeah Wexler had to get them up to NYC. Too good not to use them. :)
     
  20. eddiel

    eddiel Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    I tell you I would've loved to have been a fly on the wall when he walked into the studio and they both saw each other for the first time. Then...magic.
     
    sixelsix and zphage like this.
  21. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    I can't post it here, but, i've read books, and other biographies about it being racial. Ted White and the horn player were the ones who were drinking, and the horn player progressively made lewd comments about Aretha as the session rolled on.

    The had recorded "I Never Loved A Man The Way That I Loved You" first, and it was a success. Then, they tried to do "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man", and all they got there was the backing track. According to accounts, after the messy ordeal, and the attempt so smooth things over, Aretha and her husband disappeared for days, and couldn't be found to finish the song for a single release.

    One interesting fact: Aretha Franklin is deathly scared of flying, so every time she travels, it's by car, train, or boat.
     
    Jim Walker and eddiel like this.
  22. Grant

    Grant Audiophile and Music Fan

    Location:
    United States
    Except that Wilson Pickett was from Prattville, Alabama. He already knew what it was like.

    Someone who worked with him once described Pickett as "one of them crazy Alabama boys". That's funny because Pickett also used to call himself crazy!
     
    seed_drill and zphage like this.
  23. Needmore Wax

    Needmore Wax Member

    Location:
    Indy
    :wiggle:ROCKABILLY! INSTRUMENTAL! YEAH!:wiggle:
     
    Mylene likes this.
  24. Sternodox

    Sternodox SubGenius Pope of Arkansas

    There was some nutty stuff in the early 60s. This was one of the most insane. Check out those shrieks! These girls were seriously ON in 1963!

     
  25. sixelsix

    sixelsix Forum Resident

    Location:
    memphis, tn, usa
    Hahaha. I'm not going to disagree. I've heard him sing! (I'm a fan.)
     

Share This Page