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Why people prefer physical CD, over high-rez digital version of same release

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Turnaround, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. Pentior

    Pentior Active Member

    Location:
    Germany
    I get the feeling you didn't pay attention to the first part of my post, or this one:


    The main point is, also for one album on a short trip, using bluetooth and THE SAME buttons on your car front panel as you would use with your CD, listening not with earbuds but via THE SAME speakers your car is equipped with, it is basically the same level of convenience.

    Listening via earbuds while driving a car sounds unsafe and uncomfortable.

    This is not about convincing anybody to get rid of CDs, or force somebody into using bluetooth and a smartphone. Nobody wants to take the shinyies away :) I just thought it was unfair to claim it was somehow inconvenient to use music from modern devices.
     
    ARK likes this.
  2. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Only at the point they burn their music files to CDR and forget to choose as in iTunes music vs a file. I've done that at the age of 40 and had to rip it again and toss the unplayable file CDR.
     
  3. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    And I believe you didn't pay attention to what I said on how I played music in a car.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2021 at 7:51 AM
  4. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Again, read my previous posts on how I listen to music in my car. You're not telling me anything new or helpful.

    But I do like this back and forth because folks who have responded favoring the digital file side keep reminding me about all the little gotcha's and PITA aspect of managing individual digital files downloaded or thumb wrangled with a cellphone I had plumb forgotten.

    Keep the PITA comin'!
     
  5. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Hey, once you've gotten used to this electrickery thingie, you'll love it! You old fossil! :D
     
    Tim Lookingbill likes this.
  6. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Here's to typing with your thumbs! :edthumbs:
     
    Vaughan likes this.
  7. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    The good thing about being over 50 is that I’m old enough to remember (likely) the same people NOW saying “but it’s so emotional for me to listen to my CD, whilst I flip through the booklet” once said: “I find that CD’s sound so sterile, just zeros and ones. Where’s the warmth of vinyl. And what’s up with the tiny booklets?” :laugh:

    For the umpteenth time, there’s no universal right or wrong answer here. For better or worse. My beef has simply been with those folks who dismiss something because they don’t have a clue, which they openly justify with bogus misinformation. It’s like steak - some like it rare, some like it well done. But if that discussion was here, you’d have people saying with CERTAINTY: “If you eat it well done, your teeth MAY fall out and you get NONE of the flavours.”

    And remember, in the digital realm, files are files. Anyone’s who’s burned a CD-R will know that. Just a difference in storage medium. But yes, I get it - no glossy artwork or booklets!
     
    ARK and Grant like this.
  8. Crawdad

    Crawdad Detroit Rock Citizen

    You can put nearly five hours of 320kbps audio on a CDr. It's not a bad way to go in a car if you have a cd player in your car. Put it on shuffle and let it surprise you.
     
    ARK and Hammer70 like this.
  9. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I think these two points can be agreed upon by both sides of the debate:
    Managing a digital library (tagging, artwork, backing up) - very much a PITA (assuming everyone knows this acronym - pain in the gluteus maximus)
    Accessing anything instantaneously in my library - (CD’s, hi rez downloads, SACD’s, vinyl rips) - definitely NOT a PITA.

    I remember one of the first times I encountered a formerly 2-LP album that now fit on one CD (when CD’s went from 74 minute limits to 80) and thinking how convenient it was - no getting up THREE (!) times to flip the record. That’s literally all I’m trying to say here. But I fully understand if no one cares, appreciates or wants that convenience. It’s not for everyone. :righton:
     
  10. Crawdad

    Crawdad Detroit Rock Citizen

    Agreed, I was generalizing. I like your analogy as well, but I know way too many people over fifty that have problems navigating a computer, be it a PC, MAC, tablet, or smartphone, to know that you're an anomaly amongst our age group. The overwhelming majority don't care to know how the nuts and bolts work. jThey just want the end result. If you tried to explain to them how it worked, they would be lost even if they cared to know.
     
  11. eric777

    eric777 Astral Projectionist

    Location:
    Tennessee
    I have to respectfully disagree. It’s not about the object for many listeners but rather, the music itself. Most people are not sitting around listening to music thinking about files. They are thinking about the music which happens to be what is most important.
     
    ARK, Pentior and Hammer70 like this.
  12. Pentior

    Pentior Active Member

    Location:
    Germany
    Yeah, the discussion got so sensitive with people feeling attacked just by the very notion that another than their preferred way may also be convenient and feel awesome; it really is similar to when CD came along.
    Regarding the car topic: I was afraid (and somehow excited) the whole time that some cassette-nostalgics might come to join the fun. I mean, it's analog sound in your car! And you don't have to be that careful whenever you insert it. These things feel like real solid music, not these easy-to-warp-or-break pathetic slim discs.
    I remember my parents putting a second CD into their car's player. We had to do a two-hour operation to get it out. Can't happen with the goold old blocks!
    CD-laser skipping or failing? I mean, come on! Cassettes will work while falling down a cliff. Sweet sound until the last second. You don't even have to mind putting it into the player the right way - the cassette is so geniously designed, it will stop you from making that mistake.
     
    Hammer70 likes this.
  13. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I wish I could like your post more than once! You've said it perfectly - as I've failed to do in many posts here. Having my digital library is all about the listening for ME: I have so many sources of music in so many places around the house - on shelves, on spindles, on OTHER shelves, FLACS backed up on data discs (where I can't find a CD for them) - that by amalgamating everything into one place, I can finally appreciate what I have (and I'm not even close to being done). I acquired a Cambridge streamer which also sounds really sweet (thankfully as good as, and in some cases, better than my OPPO). Maybe I get too evangelical about it because it's been such a discovery for me after literally decades of having umpteen albums, then CD's - bridged by cassettes and minidiscs - SACD's, DVD-A, blu-ray audio. Reel to reel, 8-track and DCC are probably the only formats I haven't had! And now to bring them all together in one place to yes, LISTEN TO ...
     
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  14. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Cassette was one of my first "conveniences". I used to have to travel on public transit (bus and subway) for about two hours a day when I was 19 to get to a summer job. I would record my vinyl to Maxell XL II 90-minute cassettes - one album on each side (or a double album on a tape). That's how I passed the journey every day. And it sounded really good as well on my $150 CDN Sony Walkman (about $350 in 2021 Canadian dollars!).
     
    Pentior likes this.
  15. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Correct, I mentioned this earlier, for most people it's about hearing the music along with convenience. That's it. When it comes to members of the SH Forum, often it's about a lot more. But then we're a minority.

    I suspect there is an equal amount of "What, press what?" types as there are, "Oh, this is much better because it's new!" types. People have all kinds of reasons for doing what they do. Music on the go isn't a big thing for me. Not any more. Listening in multiple rooms? Why? I have a music room, it's all in there. And so on. Doesn't mean I don't have an amp that be assigned Zones, accepts Bluetooth and USB Sticks, because in reality - I do.

    What we lose focus on is that, ultimately, we're united as music lovers. What I do may seem stupid to you, and I may think your efforts are silly, that's okay. I don't have to live in your house, and you don't have to listen in mine. I'm far more interested in the music you guys love, than I am the tech you're using to play them.
     
    Hammer70, eric777 and Pentior like this.
  16. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Walkman's were the s***! Man, that was a whole other world back then, wasn't it? Such an innovation. I don't think there's been such a seismic change since then, has there? Some might suggest streaming, but honestly that's not a big leap, only the pricing model is. We had music files long before that, and we streamed things through Youtube. Honestly, we make things more complex than they need to be.
     
    Hammer70 likes this.
  17. 3m3rson

    3m3rson Active Member

    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Assuming the same mastering, I go for the CD every time because:
    1. they were scientifically designed to be high resolution (relative to all formats in 1979) per the Nyquist theorem
    2. the CD's physical format is "compact" for storage/display and the resulting library will last a long time without risk of hard drive failure and crazy backup
    3. when ripped to a media server, your digital library doesn't require a ridiculous amount of storage
    4. having fallen out of favor, CDs are ridiculously cheap
    5. CDs are easily inherited / passed on to others for them to discover new music
    CDs get a bad rap because of poor mastering that began in the mid-1990's and the loudness war of the 2000's. Then SACD/DVD-A came out with new masterings by engineers who knew what they were doing and sophisticated listeners flocked to that format. Meanwhile a younger generation grew up with lossy compressed MP3s, and are now being sold the Hi-Rez stuff as the latest and greatest and skipping over CDs as if they were never good enough.

    I always remind myself that high bit-rate/bit-depth PCM and DSD was developed by folks in Japan (Denon and SONY) to record/preserve their master tapes and allow re/masterings to forever keep up with modern tastes without quantization noise. Thank Harry Nyquist and James Russell, they got it right with the CD the first time around as far as the minimum requirements for consumer audio go.

    All that being said, there are two genres that I believe do benefit from Hi-Rez, being full orchestral Classical music and film scores. Both of these have bit-depths that exceed the Redbook standard and supersonic / subsonic frequencies that one can feel in their bones. On my ~$3,000 system I do hear a difference between the Redbook and DSD layers on a SACD of these genres. Otherwise I regularly get chills listening to amazing CDs of Rock / Pop / Jazz / Blues / Electronic / Hip-Hop.
     
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  18. Grant

    Grant Just chillin'!

    Location:
    United States
    It's even funnier when you listen to an album on vinyl only to discover the whole thing was originally digitally recorded and mixed anyway. So, the CD would be more accurate in those cases.

    And, it's always the same people who seem to like that somewhat raw flavor of beef. Well, I don't. To me, meat doesn't taste like meat unless it's cooked medium to well done.

    "But...but...but...what about jitter, copying speed, dye, laser strength, wobble, and pitch angle?" :shh::p
     
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  19. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Grant, my friend, I'm a medium to well-done steak eater myself but I'm not opening up that can of worms here! :righton:

    (Awaits first response of "then why don't you just eat a shoe - because it tastes the same! :realmad:") :laugh::laugh:
     
    Grant likes this.
  20. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Fully agreed, mate. To be able to take my cassettes on the road with me - I didn't have a car yet to play them in - was absolute bliss. For me, it was THE seismic change. I was absolutely floored by the amount of music I could carry on my iPods over the years - and now my high rez portables allow me to take DSD files out of the house - but the trusty cassette was truly my first love of innovation.
     
    Vaughan likes this.
  21. flyingdutchman

    flyingdutchman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu, HI
    Streaming in our cars was the next big seismic change after cds and it made our smartphones the access point for our cars. I can stream pretty much anything I want now (and some I don't). I don't need cds any more for my car and I certainly don't need to use a USB to listen to my collection in my car. I can do all that via Qobuz
     
    Hammer70 likes this.
  22. Grant

    Grant Just chillin'!

    Location:
    United States
    Well, not only is there some music that is still unavailable in the streaming services, I can't play my custom comps through them. So, since I don't like hooking up my phone to my car for privacy reasons, USB it is for me.
     
    Carl Swanson and Hammer70 like this.
  23. julienbakerfan

    julienbakerfan Whippersnapper

    Location:
    Arkansas
    I can play CDs in my car easily, without the hassle of connecting my phone, picking out an album from my huge collection, etc.
     
    Hammer70 likes this.
  24. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    When I bought a new car at the beginning of 2020, the dealer didn't even tell me that there was a CD player in the glove box. I discovered it by accident! :eek:
     
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  25. Bill Mac

    Bill Mac Forum Resident

    Location:
    So. ME USA
    I'm not sure where I see the benefit of burning music to CDRs from CDs or other sources in this day and age. I'm definitely a shiny disc guy first but do appreciate the convenience of playing music from hard drives (home) or Tidal from my iPhone (car).
     

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