Why people prefer physical CD, over high-rez digital version of same release

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Turnaround, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    'All part of the basic business model' - 'they'll NEVER be able to stop paying us!'
     
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  2. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    Reminds me of seeing a couple of Y-T (I think) videos of folks exploring abandoned malls here in the U.S. 'as if they were archeological digs.'
     
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  3. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    I should have clarified that with "visually" focus on.

    EG.
     
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  4. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    I get the appeal of 'compactness,' especially for those "constantly on the move," but myself, while I'm glad to get things that I don't have in physical form in a file format, I still only consider digital storage to be back-up (and that's based on personal experience; I also consider audio CASSETTES to be "a more permanent form of storage" than anything based on a computer; I have cassettes from the 1970s that still play just fine; I couldn't even guesstimate how much music that 'I once had' on computer but no longer do, due to computer failures of one sort or another).
    To be clear, I'm in no way trying to be critical of other people 'who need other solutions,' I just know my own preferences.
    As I wrote earlier, for me, the day or two of moving is a small and inconsequential price to pay for the convenience of access; if I want to look at info on the jacket/liner, etc., compare different versions of releases, all I need do is walk over and get it.
    I also have never lived in an apt./house/city where 'the cost of space' was any kind of variable; any place I've lived has had enough space w/o the recordings being "a special consideration." Now, the drumset, keyboards, amps, etc. are a different issue...
    I'd also posit that while the words might be the same, reading on a device like a Kindle or a computer is NOT the same as reading from paper. Were I a commuter, such devices might be of more interest, but as I'm not any more...
     
  5. Ma Kelly

    Ma Kelly Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bristol
    I think that most people (on this site at least) who only stream or have music on hard drives were also at one time or other physical music collectors, and I'd include myself in that, having got rid of all my CDs about 8 years ago. I used to love having stacks of CDs to look at, and I used to love pulling out the booklets - especially on a well-researched reissue with loads of notes. That's all gone now, but it's just simply been replaced - every time I download an album I can just as quickly read all about them on google where there's usually infinitely more information and photos than is contained in a booklet.

    So I'm not sure why you're assuming those of us that don't have physical collections don't connect to all the other aspects of being a music nerd that comes with having a large collection - it's just accessed differently, the same way the actual music files are accessed. I mean, I kinda get the same kick from having a nice Foobar set up with nice artwork (bigger than any CD artwork too) and track times and dates and whatnot that I did from having shelves and shelves of CDs taking up space.

    Ultimately, until you've completely ditched your physical collection (you say you like spotify), you have no idea how you'll still find ways to connect with the music and everything associated with and you're kinda assuming that that connection gets lost once you ditch the physical.
     
  6. EdwinM

    EdwinM Grumpy old man

    Location:
    Leusden
    I work in a technical function, cutting edge. For me a back to basics approach is a way to relax after work.
     
  7. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I can only speak for myself but I’m 56 years old, busy (though not as much as before as my two kids are practically adults now) - I used to enjoy the whole booklet experience but now I only choose to focus on the product. Because I generally prefer hi-rez downloads over the same mastered CD, I don’t even get to enjoy the super deluxe box sets with nice books (like the Beatles sets, Lennon, Who Sell Out), where the book is the ONE thing I’d enjoy. Very few new CD releases excite me unless it’s CD-only (recent Level 42 box, which was my first CD purchase in over a decade).
     
  8. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    LOL; I couldn't be more different; after 50 plus years, my only 'restraints' are financial, not "interest based," which is "the same as it's always been." If I only get 2-3 in a week, it's a slow week.
    Give me an hour or two, and I'd have NO problems finding thousands of dollars worth of releases I'd like to hear, across numerous 'genres.'
     
  9. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    And I’m the opposite now. For the most part, finances aren’t an issue for me. I’ve actually ended up putting in more time working from home and made more money during the pandemic. But busting open an LP or new CD box set is something that excited me DECADES ago. I still make online downloadable purchases of newer re-releases on Fridays and out-of-print releases can be accessed very easily without paying through the nose to someone on Discogs (sorry, I don’t see where anyone in the music-producing supply chain gets paid there). So there’s lots to get excited by as I build my library still. The quick access to my library has actually resulted in me listening to MORE music at home now than I have for probably 20 years (where I mainly listened to it on my commute to work each day).

    Thankfully I have ample space in the basement where all my music clutter sits on shelves - CD’s, vinyl, a few hundred homemade cassettes, minidiscs, box sets, you name it. I -REALLY- don’t need to add to that pile.
     
  10. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Me too man. The older I get, the more I'm interested in. I have an Amazon Wish List of 2000 items, goodness knows how many on Discogs. I like the idea of finally having everything I want, but that's a wish that moved into fantasy a long time ago. It also wasn't long ago that people were selling off their Vinyl because CD was the thing. Now they claim that's different, because Vinyl "sounds better". Sound familiar? I've been here before. Streaming suits some people, and that's great. But not for me.
     
  11. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Sure, if money is your focus, streaming is great. It's never been about the money for me. Sure, it's a constraint, but that's okay. If I "pay through the nose" for a title - well, I'd of determined it was something I want badly enough.

    As for listening to more music - that somewhat happened to me when I tried streaming. I found myself playing "unknown" music much more often, after all, why not - it's there. I also found myself switching between artists and albums more often. But for me, it was a sign that my attention span was retracting - I was more impatient because of all the possibilities, which got in the way of deep dives into an album (I only ever play entire albums, never individual songs). So in a way, my experience was the same as yours (more music), but I didn't find that advantageous.
     
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  12. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    'Whew! What a relief!'
    I'm only a few over 300...
    And under 100 at Discogs.

    I too mostly play full albums, or at least the entire side of an LP; while I do sometimes play one song, or a series of different ones from different recordings, that's the exception.
     
  13. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I probably wasn’t very clear in what I wrote but what surprised me after I started ripping my CD’s to a digital library was that I was -FINALLY- listening all the way through to those albums that I hoarded years ago (like many people here). That’s what commuting allowed me to do, that I couldn’t with home listening (no time, too much on my plate, small children). Now I can finally do that - and I think it’s primarily because I can access everything AT HOME so easily. Instead of digging through shelves of discs. We’re also trying to move towards a clutter-free existence so my all my physical disc music and films have to out of sight in the basement. ;)
     
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  14. EdwinM

    EdwinM Grumpy old man

    Location:
    Leusden
    My Discogs wishlist is only 4 cds big, which I can't find for a fair price.
     
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  15. ILovethebassclarinet

    ILovethebassclarinet Forum Resident

    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    Sounds familiar...
    Personally, I've always found a connection between "a lack of clutter" and "the possibilities of getting bored."
    I have lots of books and music; I NEVER get bored.
    I also want to emphasize that I get that "there is no universal answer when this is the question."
     
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  16. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Another aspect that I never thought to addressing: my very nice Cambridge streamer is only 2-channel. Thankfully my OPPO-93 (firmware last updated in 2011 :D) can play ISO files. So I’ve ripped all my blu-ray audios and DVD-audios to a 2TB drive (the maximum size the OPPO will read). And I’m good to go. Unfortunately on the OPPO, there’s no instantaneous access (like I have with JRiver app). So there’s some scrolling to get to the disc ISO’s. Still quicker than fetching a disc and loading it, and infinitely more portable. I’ll likely never fill it.

    HOWEVER, the OPPO cannot play SACD ISO’s from a file, so for multichannel SACD’s I still am disc-based. I have the 2-channel DSD files in my JRiver digital library but my older OPPO doesn’t play DSD data files, so discs it is for multichannel! :wave:
     
  17. jwoverho

    jwoverho Licensed Drug Dealer

    Location:
    Mobile, AL USA
    I sold all my vinyl decades ago, and around 5000 CDs over the course of 5 years or so. I've since started building a new vinyl collection and rebuying the CDs that I REALLY want. My music server has around 4 TB of data. I do like the convenience of pulling up the app on my phone or tablet to play a selection, but I still enjoy putting a record on the turntable or spinning a CD/SACD. Whatever makes you happy is what's important.
     
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  18. PaeffgenBlue

    PaeffgenBlue Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Germany
    I buy both formats and a deciding factor is often the price tag. CD prices often drop when an album is no longer in its initial campaign phase, the prices for digital downloads however remain the same, which I find quite ridiculous in some cases.

    An example: I just ordered the CD version of "Delta" by Mumford & Sons for less than 6 €/$ while the digital version at Qobuz - which only has standard CD resolution - would cost almost 20 €/$

    I tend to buy hi-res downloads when I already have the album in a physical format and I therefore already have the full artwork and lyrics.
    There are exceptions, like when the price for the hi-res download is really attractive. You often find such offers via the artist's own websites.
    I got Damon Albarn's "Everyday Robots" in hi-res via his webstore for less than a physical medium.
    Cyndi Lauper's "Detour" was offered for a reduced price when it was freshly released, so I got that at Qobuz for the same price as a standard CD quality download or physical medium.

    A big minus is that downloads of any price and quality still lack any kind of written or visual content like digital booklets.
     
  19. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    Even though I prefer CD's over downloading and streaming music as I've mentioned here, I'm puzzled why someone would amass 5000 or so music CD's and other hard copy formats. This gets into "there's no accounting for taste" territory on music purchase decisions. Not all music is that good enough to want to buy that many albums on any format.

    Good grief, YEAH, if I had that much music I'ld probably want to go archival digital on a backup system to hard drive or Cloud upload or streaming service and use a search engine to cull through all those millions of songs.

    I probably have about 100 CD's at best because I just don't have the time to cull through all the millions of artists that got a record deal to make a purchase. There's only so much of any genre of music be it Classical to Pop to Jazz that would allow time to appreciate. Maybe the real issue in this thread topic is music "hoarding". It's a sickness not fixed by format or any other delivery of choice.

    No one can like that much music enough to remember where they put it.
     
  20. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    40 years of collecting. 40 x 52 (or 53) weeks per year. That's over 2000 weeks right there. You'd only need to buy 3 albums a week in that time (on average) to reach more than 5000 albums.

    EG.
     
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  21. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    40 years of hoarding and not having the ability to know there's a lot of crap music out there that doesn't need purchasing or archiving. How many times has anyone listened to a long list of random songs and just said NEXT! NEXT! NEXT! I do that almost by habit because I have the ability to discern what's good from crap within the first 30 seconds!
     
  22. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    I just like/enjoy a lot of music. Probably others do too. But 5000 or so albums in a lifetime's ongoing collection wouldn't be excessive in my opinion.

    EG.
     
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  23. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    So how do you find a song that pops into your head where you can't remember the title, just the melody searching online among 5000 CD's?
     
  24. Nike

    Nike Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Croatia
    I love cd/dvd/lp. And buy lp on regular basis. I also use streaming services to hear new music,new artist etc. when i go running i stream, few years ago i used i pod, now using iphone and streaming services put my ipods on shelf. I can’t have only downloaded music, just not right for me. Music is my life, and i im love with my lp/cd/dvd.
     
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  25. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    You're not alone in that, a lot of people have the same mindset. I look at it differently though - the coffee table, the extra chair, more than two chairs at the dining room table, pictures on the walls - that's clutter. My music, and my wife's books, they're the essentials of life. I can't imagine considering them "clutter", but that doesn't mean you should feel the same (of course!)

    I've been someone who only listens to complete albums since I bought my first CD in the early 80's. With Vinyl I might have played only one side, but the silver discs did away with that, and listening to the entire thing in one shot has been my M,O, every since. Welcome to the club! :)
     
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