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Why people prefer physical CD, over high-rez digital version of same release

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Turnaround, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. Hammer70

    Hammer70 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Perhaps your trusty butler, the one who fetches your CD's for you from the shelves, can pick up my toys? ;)

    (it's all good, mate :wave:)
     
  2. Gary_Stewart

    Gary_Stewart Forum Resident

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Something physical will almost always have some value. Even if it's $1, that's $1 more than the value of a downloaded file. I recently traded in a big box of Blu-ray of stuff that I now have due to HBO and Disney+ to Amoeba for store credit. Of course, I got a tiny fraction of what I paid for the discs, but I still walked away with over $150 in store credit. Try getting that for Digital Downloads.

    I have nothing against digital downloads, but I just won't pay for them (for the most part).
     
    paulybauls and Audiowannabee like this.
  3. Vaughan

    Vaughan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Essex, UK
    Maid. Always maids. I've no use for a Butler. :D
     
    Eric_Generic and Hammer70 like this.
  4. MikeManaic61

    MikeManaic61 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Virginia
    I'm going to add on this list Janet Jackson's self titled album along with the Velvet Rope. Barry White's Icon of Love, Michael Jackson's Dangerous, Luther Vandross Power of Love etc...

    My problem with this period isn't the length of the album, but the length of the songs. R&B tend to be a little guilty of this during the 90's, some or most of the songs could've been trimmed down to 4 minutes or less.
     
    Grant and Eric_Generic like this.
  5. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    Other looooooooooooooong albums from 1991-92:

    We Can't Dance (Genesis go from 45 mins with Invisible Touch to 70)
    Erotica
    Prince "Symbol"
    Blood Sugar Sex Magik

    EG.
     
  6. Carl Swanson

    Carl Swanson Forum Resident

    I have -0- unplayable CDs out of over 4,000 over a period of 35 years.

    I have had a handful of problems with 60,000+ digital files (of my own discs) across several drives. Learned to avoid Seagate and Maxtor in favor of WD.

    But I always had multiple backups, other HDs and the discs themselves.
     
    Giobacco and Grant like this.
  7. VinchVolt123

    VinchVolt123 I took a look at those hands.

    Location:
    Chino Hills, CA
    We Can't Dance particularly sticks out to me because it audibly sounds like Genesis put together a decent prog album and then stuffed it with a bunch of pop-oriented cuts to pad out the runtime. I still stand by my belief that if you truncate the album to "No Son of Mine", "Jesus He Knows Me", "Driving the Last Spike", "Dreaming While You Sleep", "Living Forever", and "Fading Lights", you get a much better record out of it and with a configuration that fits perfectly on one LP (three songs per side, 44:44 total).

    Of course a long album isn't necessarily a bad one-- David Bowie's 1. Outside (74:36), R.E.M.'s New Adventures in Hi-Fi (65:33), and Peter Gabriel's Up (66:40) all use their runtimes excellently to name a few examples (even if 1. Outside peters in a couple spots)-- but We Can't Dance is definitely a good case study in how trying to force out a lengthier runtime can very often make the final product go awry.
     
  8. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    How old is your computer? Any modern computer build in the last five years or so with a multi-core processor and adequate RAM should not be producing glitches. I can record vinyl while surfing the web and work in Photoshop with ease.
     
    Pentior and Tim Lookingbill like this.
  9. St. Matthew

    St. Matthew Forum Resident

    Location:
    NY, USA
    Probably still using Windows XP...
     
  10. scobb

    scobb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Actually is a 2 or 2.5 terabyte “gaming” computer (so has far more ram etc than I know what to do with as I don’t game) I bought the Christmas before last! Maybe I’ve been unlucky?
     
  11. Eric_Generic

    Eric_Generic Enigma

    Location:
    Berkshire
    This little beauty still hasn't let me down...

    [​IMG]
    EG.
     
  12. Mirrorblade.1

    Mirrorblade.1 Forum Resident

    If we had a emp pulse no matter how backed up you have your computer would most likely be dead
    See world of the worlds and my cds will most likely be safe in there plastic cases...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2021
  13. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    RAM is not the same as hard drive space. That people think this is such a common misunderstanding among non-computer types that it's baffling.
     
  14. scobb

    scobb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    The important word was "gaming" in regards to RAM. I assume that "gaming" computers require RAM?!
     
  15. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    All computers require RAM to function. Here's how it basically works:

    All data is stored on a hard drive or SSD. When you turn on the computer, once the BIOS checks to ensure everything is in order, it loads the operating system into the RAM from the hard drive so it is ready. When you tell your computer to start a program, the CPU tells the RAM what it wants, and the RAM sends the data to the CPU, and loads it so you can use it. So, they all work together through a bus.

    It is much more complicated than that, and there are more busses that utilize chipsets. But, anyway, RAM is not hard drive space. An operating system, such as Windows, can utilize reserved virtual RAM on the hard drive, but with the efficiency, speed, and size of today's RAM in the typical modern computer, it really shouldn't be needed. A Windows 10 computer can run on 8GB RAM, but 16 GB RAM is ideal, and all most people should need, even for games. Only the most demanding uses like serious video editing, audio multitracking, and CAD, require more RAM. For SSD, the bigger the drive, the better. But, that's another issue altogether. And, this is getting far off the topic.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2021
    Tim Lookingbill likes this.
  16. HotelYorba101

    HotelYorba101 Forum Resident

    Location:
    California
    My newer model needs Band on The Run to function
     
  17. scobb

    scobb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    I'm not sure what you are driving at? Correct me if I'm wrong but my understanding is "gaming" often requires large amounts of RAM so a gaming computer will, generally, have sufficient RAM for ordinary day to day use (I'm actually having difficulty writing that sentence because I am using generalisations and you seem intent on picking out obscurities so please take that statement as a generalisation)!?
     
  18. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    I just added more text to that post. read on...
     
  19. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    Anyway, about 16 GB RAM is fine for most games and most other things.

    As far as core utilization of the CPU is concerned, A lot depends on if a particular game even utilizes multicores and/or hyperthreading. Some do, some don't. Mainly, more cores means better multitasking. More RAM means a smoother, more responsive experience.

    Anyway, if your machine is glitching the music, it could be a few things. The buffer settings in your program may need to be adjusted. If you run a very old computer, the internet may interfere.
     
    Tim Lookingbill likes this.
  20. Tim Lookingbill

    Tim Lookingbill Alfalfa Male

    Location:
    New Braunfels, TX
    There's the issue of buffering when using large amounts of RAM vs when the processor decides to conduct page out reads to the hard drive which uses slower buss paths. Gaming is quite processor intensive.

    I'm not suggesting this has anything to do with your sound issues. I'm just relaying what I've learned about the complexities of computers and their OS.

    For example after a lot of buss/RAM/HD/Processor activity listening to a lot of YouTube vids from this site, an hour of image edits in Adobe Bridge and audio edits in Audacity at the end of it all if I try to burn a CDR in iTunes, it'll take forever where I'ld get an error.

    What I do to fix this is to shutdown my 2010 MacMini, unplug it from the wall and plug it in again and reboot. iTunes burns the CDR faster without errors. Another time in this same situation I'll launch iTunes and it won't let me drag audio files into it so I don't see what the problem is. It never did this before.

    I inserted a blank CDR and then launched iTunes...Wah-Lah it took my files. What I took from this is things can get backed up on computers after a lot of activity. Same with my Firefox internet browser. I just dump history, browser cache and unwanted cookies and restart and it's much faster.

    Also Mac OS X runs Cron scripts that basically clean house and defrags my hard drive but ONLY at 3AM which I can tell when I'm using my computer at that time. Things get a bit slow and unresponsive. I'm typing this at 2:56AM and it's fixing to start happening as I'm typing this.
     
  21. Hawkmoon

    Hawkmoon Eternal Champion, Master of the Universe

    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    If we have a significant EMP event in a developed country then it will likely be an armageddon type situation tbh as most power grids are not protected against EMP. So unless you are a prepper you would most likely be facing no power, no water, no food (because no supermarkets - unless self-sufficient), rioting and civil disorder etc. Under those circs I don't think you would be sitting smug thinking "well at least my CDs are OK"
     
    Pentior likes this.
  22. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    In Windows 10, one can easily monitor the CPU and RAM usage to see if you have a bottleneck somewhere. And, you can monitor how many of your cores take a hit.

    And, yes, games are CPU intensive. That is why a lot of gamers like to overclock. Overclocking is something that I do not recommend for anyone other than experienced geeks who know what they are doing. In fact, overclocking can void your warranty and shorten the life of your processor.

    Some people like to overclock the RAM. Intel calls their XMP, and if your motherboard and RAM support it, the BIOS will support it with at least two profiles, and options for customizing it. many people do this to force their RAM to operate at the advertised speed, but can cause instability in some configurations. Doing this can also void your CPU warranty and shorten its life. Though overclocking RAM and overclocking the CPU should have nothing to do with each other, overclocking RAM can cause some processors to run over their intended parameters, which is why it can destabilize your computer and damage your processor. But, this is uncommon if one uses a conservative profile.
     
  23. Grant

    Grant Back to the 60s!

    Location:
    United States
    If you had EMP, you would be able to play your CDs anyway. And, if we had a Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse, we probably would more things to worry about than playing music!
     
    Crawdad likes this.
  24. Hawkmoon

    Hawkmoon Eternal Champion, Master of the Universe

    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    Precisely so, a high altitude nuclear detonation leading to a nationwide EMP would possibly be the start of a wider nuclear exchange
     
    Grant likes this.
  25. Pentior

    Pentior Forum Resident

    Location:
    Germany
    Well, all of you are slaves of dependency. I still won't trash my good old phonograph. No unreliant icky-ticky electronics. True, self-sufficient mechanic amplification. As honest as music can get. I'll laugh in my cellar listening to a dance-track-sampler of the 20s*, while you try to read your CDs by eyesight.

    *Edit: 1920s, of course. We'll have to call it that by default in just a few years ^^
     

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