Beatles 2014 mono LPs going out of print...*

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by SurrealCereal, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    You really shouldn’t believe everything people tell you. Even those who supposedly are in the know. And especially things which defy logic and fact.
     
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  2. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Why not NOS of original pressings - including black and gold label Please Please Me’s - while they’re at it? :targettiphat:
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
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  3. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Do you even know how the analog recording, mixing and mastering process has worked for the last 60+ years?
     
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  4. Uglyversal

    Uglyversal Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sydney
    Whatever...
     
  5. jon9091

    jon9091 Master Of Reality

    Location:
    Midwest
    Kinda hard to believe that when we’ve seen pictures of Steve with the master tapes.
    Or were they just for show?
     
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  6. I don't believe everything I'm told, quite honestly, and very little I'm reading on here! But why should the statement that digital has existed since the 60's defy logic? The process of inventing and refining CD started in 1969 as did digital recording.
     
  7. Greenmonster2420

    Greenmonster2420 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Colorado
    How do you like the -4/-3 compared to the 1969 UK?
     
  8. I think the point the people I was talking to were making was that digital recordings have existed a lot longer than we might realise. Yes, of course, there were tapes at one time but maybe not as many recordings as we might think were made using tape.
     
  9. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Perhaps, for starters, because the processing and memory required for digital audio recording at anything resembling studio quality would have been beyond prohibitively expensive in the 60s and 70s?

    Most “improvements” in audio recording (as with many things) are not to make them better, but to make them cheaper and easier. Digital recording in the 60s or 70s would have been neither cheaper nor easier.

    And that’s just one logical fly in the ointment. Bottom line...your sources are blowing smoke up someone’s rear end.
     
  10. Leviethan

    Leviethan Forum Resident

    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I have a 4/2U pressing from 1976, cut by HTM. It's really nice and was under $50.
     
  11. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    No, many of us are actually familiar with the history of digital recording. And it’s been going on for how long we think it has.

    Analog reel to reel tape was used virtually exclusively for professional music recording from the 50s thru the 70s, still predominantly through much of the 80s, and even a quickly diminishing degree in the 90s. So if by “one time”, you mean the better part of 40+ years, yes you are correct.
     
  12. Except that professional digital recordings were being made in the early 70's and sold commercially. Few admittedly but they exist!
     
  13. YpsiGypsy

    YpsiGypsy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Michigan, USA
    I feel very lucky, I got mine about a year and a half ago, with tax and shipping it still came in below the list price.
     
    • January 1971: Using NHK'S PCM recording system, engineers at Denon record the first commercial digital recordings, Something by Steve Marcus and The World Of Stomu Yamashita by Stomu Yamashta. [3]
    • 1972: Denon unveils the first 8-channel digital recorder, the DN-023R, which uses 47.25 kHz 13-bit PCM resolution and 4-head open reel broadcast video tape recorder.[3] The first recording with this new system is the Smetana Quartet performing Mozart's String Quartets K.458 and K.421, recorded in Tokyo April 24–26. Several other digitally recorded LPs follow.
    (excerpt from Wikipedia)
     
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  14. Alex Zabotkin

    Alex Zabotkin Forum Resident

    Location:
    Pepperland
    It's also possible that your copy was pressed in 1975. The -4 side 1 was cut by HTM on 31 Oct 1975 according to the master tape box.

    The -2U side 2 is not a HTM cut, though. It's a much earlier recut done by someone at Apple (probably by Malcolm Davies, the original mastering engineer, or his apprentice, George Peckham).
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  15. Very few.....and this was the first major label release: 1979
    Bop Till You Drop is Ry Cooder's eighth album, released in 1979. The album was the first digitally recorded major-label album in popular music. Bop Till You Drop was recorded on a digital 32-track machine built by 3M.
     
  16. I know, I bought that not long after it came out. It sounded incredible then but not so much now! As my post #1914 shows though there were other digital recordings pre-dating this album by as many as 8 years.
     
  17. teag

    teag Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colorado
    Why don't you start another thread on this as you are way off topic.
     
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  18. 14 Cheerleader Coldfront

    14 Cheerleader Coldfront Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    This thread has officially jumped the shark.
     
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  19. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Yes there were handful of corporate financed R&D classical music projects which did get released. I didn’t think commercial digital recording capability just suddenly and miraculously dropped out of thin air in the late 70s. In fact, digital recording concepts actually go back well before the 60s.

    But that’s all irrelevant to the demonstrably false, illogical and nonsensical assertions 1) no reissues have been cut from analog tape in 40 years and 2) DAT and digital have been used since the 60s so some of the much talked about master tapes are a figment of the collective imagination.

    The fact is there have been and continue to be reissues cut from analog. Not many these days, of course - for a variety of reasons - and not enough in many people’s opinion, but they can and do happen. And they were certainly still the standard in the early-mid 80s before the Vinyl Dark Ages.

    The fact of the matter is that 99.9999999% of the professional recordings made before 1978 were not digital - and still a significant percentage well into the 80s. And a high percentage of those analog tapes (as well as analog tape copies of those tapes) still exist (in varying degrees of condition of course).
     
  20. The Beatles mono LP's are still currently available...........
    There!
     
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  21. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Yes, you’re right. Sorry.
     
  22. teag

    teag Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colorado
    Which ones? And where?
     
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  23. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    It officially jumped the shark long ago.
     
  24. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Why don’t they just reissue them? It’s not fair.
     

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