EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    Even though "Like A Rolling Stone" from 1965 by Bob Dylan ran six minutes.
     
    CliffL likes this.
  2. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    You couldn't get away from this song during the late fall of 1971. I got sick of hearing it back then. As I kid, I had no idea what he was singing about, but I liked it.
     
    Damiano54 likes this.
  3. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    We have an oldies station, but they rarely, if ever play it.
     
  4. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    It always gets played here. When it comes on everybody says they hate it but end up either singing along or trying to explain the lyric.
     
  5. John B Good

    John B Good Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    NS, Canada
    Me too, I always go for the quirky.
     
  6. Don McLean was killing them softly with his song.
     
    pablo fanques likes this.
  7. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    Next is "Let's Stay Together" by Al Green, #1 from February 6 - February 12, 1972.
     
  8. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Amazing song from start to finish, Al Green is in perfect form on this song.
     
    Dougd and zebop like this.
  9. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Now we're talking! "Let's Stay Together" is a stone classic, one that never gets old even after I've played it so many times I can (badly) mimic every single inflection Rev. Green makes.

    While the 45 version is fine, I always feel cheated when I hear it - the extended version is where it's at.
     
    sunspot42 and zebop like this.
  10. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    That extended version first appeared in the 80s. It was never on the album either.

    Every Billboard #1 R&B hit discussion thread

    I'll repost what I wrote on that thread a couple of days ago:

    It is December 31, but since I will be out celebrating new years tonight, i'm going to present the first #1 R&B single of 1972 now:

    Let's Stay Together - Al Green



    This song started out my 1972 right! It was the first week back at school after the Christmas break, and I came home to find my sister had beat me home. She had the afternoon off for a doctor's appointment, but afterward, she went to the PX and bought this single, and "Sugar Daddy" by The Jackson 5 together. We played these two songs repeatedly for two hours until mom got home from work. I really enjoyed the two songs. No, "Sugar Daddy" didn't hit #1, but it was new product from the group, and, it was a single that was included on their new Greatest Hits album. In fact, both of these songs are in mono. "Sugar Daddy" is a unique mono mix. But, back to Al Green...

    This was the first song I ever heard by him at the time. I was impressed. The singing, the phrasing, the soulful music, especially the Wurlitzer organ, and especially, the loud drums (producer Willie Mitchell's signature sound) amounted to soulful bliss. We would hear a lot more great stuff from Mr. Green for the next three years.

    This record also hit #1 the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, but first, they have to get through their first #1 of the year.

    Note to @W.B.
    The 45 in the clip above is the exact styrene pressing I have.
     
    John22, Hey Vinyl Man and CliffL like this.
  11. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    Bill Haley was doing rock and roll revival shows before "American Pie" -- also, my copy of (LP) Oldies But Goodies Vol. 11 shows a picture of Chuck Berry at some oldies show on July 31, 1971 on the rear cover -- and (as may have been mentioned before), the incident at a rock and roll revival show that drove Rick Nelson to write "Garden Party". All of these happened before "American Pie" was out.

    I do hear "American Pie" occasionally on my local radio stations. As I am not always thinking about those times, the song gives a nice refresher history lesson when I do hear it.

    WRT to the lyric "no angel born in hell could break that satanic spell" -- I always thought it was specifically talking about the Rolling Stones in Altamont -- and nothing else (not Morrison, or Diamond) -- specifically because of the Hell's Angels reference, and also the vague reference to "Sympathy For the Devil". In addition, "jack flash sat on a candlestick" part also makes me think of the Rolling Stones (via "Jumpin' Jack Flash").
     
    sunspot42 likes this.
  12. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Lou Reed? At a Woodstock retrospective? Seems like an odd fit!
     
  13. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Well, we got through Ballad of the Green Berets and Eve of Destruction without too much bloodshed, so hopefully we can handle anything else that comes our way!
     
    sunspot42 and alphanguy like this.
  14. W.B.

    W.B. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    For me, complimenting the crack Hi house band (including drummer and song co-writer Al Jackson, ex Booker T. & The M.G.'s) and backing singers that aided Mr. Green on this, his only pop chart-topper, has always been the label typesetting from CBS Pitman:
    [​IMG]
    And for me, this mix and edit does it all.
     
    zebop, CliffL and Grant like this.
  15. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Forum Resident

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Yup. It blew me away the first time I heard it and it kept going.
     
  16. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    Yes - I thought so also. Although, I don't think it was really a "retrospective" per se; more like an anniversary concert at the original site which happened to have some acts that played at the original. Many songs were played that dated from later.

    At the time, I thought this 1998 gig was attractive to Reed since it was relatively close to NYC. I never did find out more about that. It was my first time seeing him. I had heavily gotten into him about five years previous to that.

    To me, Townshend was also an interesting choice, since he doesn't seem to have fond memories of the original concert (I believe someone gave him LSD without his knowledge). I may be mistaken, but didn't he write "Won't Get Fooled Again" as somewhat of a response to the hippie movement? He did play that song that day which I found to be completely ironic.

    And of course, Mitchell didn't make it to the original concert because she stayed in NYC so she'd make her TV appointment on The Dick Cavett Show.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  17. CliffL

    CliffL Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sacramento CA USA
    This song exploded right out of the gate...it had been out about two days and I decided to buy a copy (with picture sleeve). What sold me on it was how unusual it was...a long complex story song. Right away it got massive airplay and I got a bit tired of it pretty quickly, although I still think it is a very good song. But the radio saturation it got and the polarization it inspires tends to get in the way of appreciating it as a work of art.
     
    Grant likes this.
  18. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    See, people in other parts of the country talk about polarization or censoring of hit songs, but I just didn't get that in my part of the country. I don't know why.

    I never knew "American Pie" was controversial until the internet age.
     
  19. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Catch up for American Pie. I got this single not knowing anything about it along with several others a couple of weeks before radio started playing it. A favorite record store had put out a large display of promo copies of various records for a dime apiece which was unusual in and of itself for them. I was drawn to AP because of it's iconic picture sleeve and figured a dime wouldn't kill me, probably one of the best bargains I ever got. Like most everyone else, I loved the song and enjoyed dissecting the lyrics with friends for weeks. I find the slow passage that bookends the tune to be a neat effect that gives it an added air of importance even if it interrupts the flow of the song like some have pointed out. I also agree with others who prefer Vincent as well as Dreidel, Wonderful Baby, If We Try and even his cover of Crying in the 80s. By the way, some other 45s I got in that batch were For A Day Like Today by Suzie Jane Hokum (the name attracted me), I Won't Call You Back by a then unknown Kim Carnes and Beautiful People/When There's No Love Left by The New Seekers. All in all, a very good record score that day!

     
    CliffL likes this.
  20. CliffL

    CliffL Forum Resident

    Location:
    Sacramento CA USA
    My whole family loved Al Green, especially my mom and one of my brothers. I was thrilled when "Let's Stay Together" went to number one. Interestingly enough, I was already familiar with his producer Willie Mitchell (and Hi Records) because my parents had let me have their copy of Mitchell's hit "Soul Serenade" (backed with "Mercy Mercy Mercy" which was also very good.)

     
    zebop and Grant like this.
  21. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    The reason I figured American Pie was the controversial song OP was referring to was the passage about The Father, Son and the Holy Ghost as well as the veiled references to the Stones and Satan, fire, etc. :shrug:
     
    Hey Vinyl Man likes this.
  22. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    Great song, but what I find most notable about the label is that it hadn't changed at all since the mid-60s. There weren't too many other labels at the time of which you could say that.
     
  23. Victor/Victrola

    Victor/Victrola Forum Resident

    Let's Stay Together is such a great song. It's funky, soulful, and recorded beautifully. And the message - true love lasts forever, no matter what comes - is universal.
     
  24. Grant

    Grant A Musical Free-Spirit

    Location:
    Arizona
    I dunno. For labels that stayed the same from 1966-1972, there's Motown, Columbia (which was all over the place in the early 70s), A&M, Atlantic 45, Roulette, Epic, Deram, ABC, Brunswick, Chess, and Soul.
     
  25. tmoore

    tmoore Forum Resident

    Location:
    Olney, MD
    ABC changed from ABC-Paramount to ABC in 1966, then for one year it had a round white logo with "abc" inside. It didn't add the "spectrum box" around the round white logo until 1967 (the round white logo got smaller at this point).

    Did Decca change? I remember seeing a new Decca logo on album covers in the early '70s (logo looked like a vinyl record surrounded by a square box, with "decca" underneath); however, the Decca 45s I have from the early '70s (all by the Who) have the same colorbar label that I saw on 1967-1968 singles (save the Who's "See Me Feel Me" one, which I think was a custom label for that 45). I know Decca ceased to exist in early 1973 (but that's after 1972). Kapp and Uni also ceased to exist at the same time as Decca -- I don't think they changed in the 1966-1972 timeframe either.

    Did Columbia change or stay the same? The prior post seems to want it both ways. I thought that (ultimately) it did permanently change after all of the back-and-forth changes in the early '70s.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
    pablo fanques likes this.

Share This Page