EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Dr. Pepper

    Dr. Pepper What, me worry?

    If you don't mind me asking, how old are you? I just turned 54 and for some reason the songs from 1972-1974 have a really unique place in my heart. It might be do to the fact that my older sisters had entered junior high and were really into listening to the radio and calling in requests. Seems like the radio was on all the time in those years.
     
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  2. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Bobby, based on music you enjoy may I recommend that you pick up a cheap copy of Sedaka’s Back, which contains that song? I think it’s up your alley and a nice album. Not well recorded, but good music. The Immigrant is my favorite all time Sedaka song and is on there as well. As another poster mentioned, it was pieced together from two albums so that’s probably why it contains a lot of good songs. The opening song, Standing On The Inside is outstanding and should have also been a single. And if you can forget the “other version” we’ll discuss later, his version of Love Will Keep Us Together is very good and one of the few songs I like just about as much as a hit version by another artist. It’s easy to see why Elton signed him to his label. Unfortunately, at least for me personally, his albums were very weak after that one and a singles comp would be much better, but Sedaka’s Back stands on it’s own as a fine album from 1974. I have it on vinyl and don’t need my CD...if you can’t find it cheap PM me and I’ll send you mine in return for all your great threads and posts!
     
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  3. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    It could indeed totally melt down. What I’ve tried to do, and not always been successful at, is to only bring up hits by artists that we’re on their only number one, or the last number one by that artist, and therefore said artist is likely going to disappear from here because of that (I know...not very elegantly put...sorry but you get my point). Otherwise, a lot of good info will never get written. For example, Sedaka wrote Love Will Keep Us Together and we know his version was not the hit, but it will be coming up soon so I referenced it but did not mention the artist. But I think it was a good point as it was such a huge song, and he did a very good version of it imo. And I think this is kinda the solution others have agreed to as well, a few pages back. We’ll see how it works, but I agree we should try to adhere to that guideline. And, as you pointed out, we don’t want to all shoot our “wad” when some big monster hits start popping up from artists that aren’t as hot during this time frame.
     
  4. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Sedaka was so new to me when Laughter was being played all the time that I thought he was a female artist! Many others thought the same back then. He had been off the radio for a long time, so it’s understandable.
     
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  5. Dr. Pepper

    Dr. Pepper What, me worry?

    I did not think he was female, but some other artists I thought were female at first.
     
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  6. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    I just turned 54 myself! I was the oldest, and my folks were almost strictly into country so I pretty much had to blaze my own trail into pop music.

    Also, we lived way in the boondocks clear up until '77, so radio reception was strictly an "after sundown" thing. '75 was the year that it all clicked into place and I really fell in love with what was coming over those crackly AM signals.

    That said, a lot of pop songs from '71 to '74 made a huge impression as they played in the world around me. But it wasn't until late '74 that I actively pursued them.
     
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  7. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    My thoughts exactly. Carpenters are a perfect example of this - we know this is their last #1. We know they're not going to make much of an impact in the last half of the decade.

    And I don't know about anyone else, but these next five years are going to be jam-packed with other artists I intend to discuss. I probably would've spotlighted "All You Get From Love Is A Love Song" since I love it so much, but other than that there will be no compelling reason to bring them up.

    So why not give an act that's been a huge part of these pages for the last five years a well-deserved bon voyage and sum up the rest of their career?

    (BTW, Helen Reddy just had her final #1, but the gang here clearly don't love her as much. :p)
     
  8. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    Curious point there. I've mentioned elsewhere how I've been noticing since I was a teenager, everyone seems to love at least one Carpenters song (and usually several), no matter how far removed that sound is from their usual tastes. That doesn't apply to many of their contemporaries, so it really seems specific not to early-70s mellow in general, but to the Carpenters in particular.
     
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  9. W.B.

    W.B. Senior Member

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    I think "at the time" many in the industry came to dislike her then-hubby Jeff Wald who had something of a "reputation," but other than that I'm not going further, and that backlash would affect her career. But it may have something to do with why her chart fortunes began to fall south after that final #1 of hers.
     
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  10. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Well, there is that pesky little detail of her dying and all that may make some want to bring it up during the 80s discussion.

    How 'bout I make a note to bring up Emotion. Ain't No Way To Treat A Lady and You're My World when the time comes? Oh dear, I just did!
     
  11. Black Thumb

    Black Thumb Unclassifiable

    Location:
    Reno, NV
    Remarkable, isn't it? That voice surely has much to do with it, and a well--crafted pop song is hard to resist.

    Definitely. It's not that adult contemporary chanteuses had become passe, we'll see a bunch of those. She'd also shown a knack for adapting to changing styles. Her nosedive (no Airport '75 pun intended) was on him.

    It'll be a good excuse to take a break from the Men At Work analysis. ;)
     
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  12. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    It’s really interesting how certain artists bring us out for pages of comments, and others get three comments while time crawls on waiting for the next entry!
     
    Grant likes this.
  13. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    All really good songs imo, but really, she was pretty tuckered out of decent material after that. And that might be the biggest reason why her chart fortunes quit. Her greatest hits album is one of the better one’s out there as it contained all her good songs and little filler.
     
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  14. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I like Laughter in the Rain, although not excessively. How many times have I said that? Not so much lately, because the no. 1 songs don't hold a candle to the previous decade (neither do nos. 2-50). I also like The Immigrant, although I'm less enthused about the rehash of Breaking Up is Hard to Do.

    (What I really like from the Sedaka playbook, however, are Next Door to an Angel (a seriously turboed-up version of Breaking Up is Hard to Do) and Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen. Oh, and Star-Crossed Lovers)
     
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  15. Grant

    Grant A Brady-Boomer Musical Free-Spirit

    No, it wasn't obvious you were talking about the 1962 version because there is that remake. If you forgot about the 1975 version, remember that we cannot read your mind to know that.

    I don't use bold type to yell. I use it to stress a point. I could use italics, but not only does that not come through when being quoted, but some people use a font that may be similar to it.

    The way many thread participants jump ahead makes me believe that they are bored with the process, and, yes, it is a process to me. Also, a journey to me suggests going through the steps one at a time.

    SomeCallMeTim just posted Neil Sedaka's cover version of his own original, No, it didn't hit #1, but it was released as a single a whole year later, and I do prefer it over the original. That's big-time jumping ahead. But, again, i'm not complaining anymore because I hope you all will see how doing that confuses the time-line.

    I vote that we call a truce on this and move on. Are you game?
     
  16. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    I was a fan in '62 probably because they appealed to an 8 year old kid as much as they were great pop songs. Everything you named is prime Sedaka and I'll add my favorite ballad that was huge around these parts - I Must Be Dreaming.

     
  17. Dr. Pepper

    Dr. Pepper What, me worry?

    I hear laughter in the rain walking hand in hand with the one I love...

    What a great lyric, great feeling, great song! Amazing how you can read those words and "wham" the song jumps into your head and "bam" you are thrown back in time to the mid seventies! Music is magic, man!
     
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  18. alphanguy

    alphanguy Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Missouri
    One chart anomaly that continued in 1975 was the appearance of a Eurovision song for a third consecutive year. Before and since, the American record buying public didn't seem to pay much mind to Eurovision songs, but starting with "Eres Tu", and rolling on through "Waterloo"... 1975 saw yet another Eurovision winner hit the top 40. It would happen again in 1976, and then not again.

     
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  19. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    This was a great Eurovision song. I think it made the top 10 here.. If it didn’t it was close. Our entry that year was the Shadows’ Let Me Be The One, which I’m assuming didn’t get much love Stateside? The Shadows came second in the contest that year.
     
  20. Bobby Morrow

    Bobby Morrow Forum Resident

    When I used to do my US chart polls on here, Helen mostly got the fewest votes. No matter what the song! Kenny Rogers fared poorly also.
     
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  21. Mylene

    Mylene Forum Resident

    [​IMG]
     
  22. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Karen Carpenter is one of the great singers in pop history. Reddy, not so much. Not that I don't like Helen Reddy - I actually do (saw her live about 6 years ago - her advancing senility was already apparent and she couldn't remember the lyrics to "You And Me Against The World" anymore, poor thing, although her voice seemed great for her age). It's just that she was no Karen.

    But then, who is...
     
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  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    That sounded like ABBA had a baby with Astrud Gilberto...
     
  24. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Both acts seem kind of hermetically sealed in the '70s, even tho Kenny had pop hits into the mid-'80s. I think they were both alright, along with Lionel Richie, but were maybe played a little more than their talents justified during their peak years. Phil Collins and Invisible Touch-era Genesis suffered from the same malady after overexposure in the '80s, although in the past few years I find myself enjoying their stuff again quite a bit.
     
  25. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Now that’s a pretty weird one...I don’t know for sure if I like or hate it! That could be a grower after a few listens. Very slight resemblance to ABBA.
     

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