Final Curtain (the Visual Arts obituary thread)*

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by JozefK, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident

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    new york, ny
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    Loved Hardy as Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester in the BBC drama, Elizabeth R.. The role seemed to suit him perfectly. R.I.P.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2017
  2. ando here

    ando here Forum Resident

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    new york, ny
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  3. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Dixie
    Anne Jeffreys, ‘General Hospital’ and ‘Topper’ Actress, Dies at 94

    Anne Jeffreys, the actress and singer known for her roles in the 1950s sitcom “Topper” and long-running daytime soap opera “General Hospital,” has died. She was 94.

    News of her death was first reported by George Pennacchio, an entertainment reporter with ABC7, who tweeted “The beautiful and elegant actress, Anne Jeffreys, has died at 94. She was a sweetheart.”

    Jeffreys’ career started in the early 1940s with a number of film roles including “Step Lively,” a musical starring Frank Sinatra. In the late ’40s she turned to Broadway. She replaced Patricia Morison in “Kiss Me, Kate” in 1948, and also appeared in the 1952 musical “Three Wishes for Jamie."

    Between 1952 and 1955 she starred in the CBS sitcom “Topper.” Her husband, Robert Sterling, was also part of the show’s central cast. Jeffreys played Marion Kerby, billed in the credits as “the ghostess with the mostest.”

    In the ’60s she appeared in television shows including “L.A. Law” and “Murder, She Wrote.” Her role in 1972’s “The Delphi Bureau” earned her a Golden Globe nomination.

    For two decades, between 1984 and 2004, she appeared in “General Hospital” as wealthy socialite Amanda Barrington. She also appeared in the its spinoff, “Port Charles.” Her most recent credit was in a 2013 episode of “Getting On.”

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  4. Otlset

    Otlset Forum Resident

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    Temecula, CA
    Topper was a real favorite of mine. Anne Jeffreys was so classy and beautiful, and sharp-witted on the show. She will be missed.

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    Henrietta: "Why Cosmo, that towel just shot across the room!"
    Cosmo: "Oh it always does that. It's a Cannon towel."
     
  5. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Dixie
    Has a thread on the music board, but deserves mention here:

    Jack Good, the man who put pop music on television – obituary

    Jack Good, who has died aged 86, was the television producer who introduced grey 1950s Britain to the disturbing new phenomenon of rock and roll, launching the careers of, among others, Cliff Richard, Tommy Steele, Adam Faith, Marty Wilde and Billy Fury, and introducing Buddy Holly and Gene Vincent to British audiences.​


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    Until a few moments ago I had no idea he'd played Trevor Howard's flunky in Father Goose. I'd always pictured him as a cigar-chewing Sid James type.

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  6. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
  7. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Dixie
    I was never too crazy about LMAD, but Hall himself had a refreshing sense of humor, as he showed in interviews.

    At the height of his fame in the early-to-mid '70s, when he was one of ABC's few stars, he hosted several TV specials as well starring in two funny Odd Couple episodes.

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  8. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
    :edthumbs:
     
  9. swandown

    swandown Forum Resident

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    Portland, OR
  10. cathandler

    cathandler Forum Resident

    Location:
    maine
  11. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Elizabeth Baur, Actress on 'Ironside,' Dies at 69

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    Elizabeth Baur, who helped Raymond Burr bring the bad guys to justice as Officer Fran Belding on the long-running NBC crime drama Ironside, has died. She was 69.

    Baur died Sept. 30 in Los Angeles following a lengthy illness, publicist Paul Gendreau announced.

    On Ironside, which starred Burr as a San Francisco police consultant who solves crimes from his wheelchair, Baur effectively stepped in for Barbara Anderson (as Eve Whitfield), who exited the show after the fourth season. Belding's character was introduced when she helped Robert Ironside and his team nab the gamblers who had murdered her father.

    Baur went on to appear in 89 episodes over four seasons until the show's conclusion in 1975, then came back for the 1993 telefilm The Return of Ironside.

    Earlier, Baur starred as Teresa O'Brien, the ward of a rancher (Andrew Duggan), for two seasons on the 1968-1970 CBS Western Lancer.

    A native of Los Angeles, Baur began her career as a contract player at 20th Century Fox and appeared in the Tony Curtis film The Boston Strangler (1968). She then moved to Universal, where she continued her TV work until exiting the industry to raise her daughter, Lesley Worton, now a producer.

    Baur also appeared on such shows as Batman, Daniel Boone, Room 222, Emergency!, Police Woman, Fantasy Island and Remington Steele.

    Survivors also include her husband Steve and a first cousin, Cagney & Lacey star Sharon Gless.
     
  12. Somehow I missed this. I always liked Jared. He didn't have the best luck in TV shows but I did enjoy the shows he was on as a kid.

    He was also in the iconic film Westworld. I had hoped he would be brought on as a guest star.
     
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  13. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Danielle Darrieux, French Film Star Over 8 Decades, Is Dead at 100

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    Danielle Darrieux, the French actress and singer whose career of sophisticated film roles spanned eight decades and indelible incarnations as ingénue, coquette, femme fatale and grande dame, died on Tuesday at her home in Bois-le-Roi, France, south of Paris. She was 100.

    Her death was confirmed by the French culture ministry. Ms. Darrieux’s companion, Jacques Jenvrin, told the French news media that she had been unwell since a recent fall.

    When the Cinémathèque Française à Paris honored Ms. Darrieux with a retrospective in 2009, more than 90 of her films were screened, yet at least a score were left out. If Ms. Darrieux — who was beloved by her countrymen as D. D. long before anyone thought of calling Brigitte Bardot B. B. — had a career prime, it was the 1950s, in which she typified the desirable European married woman.

    Three of her films from that decade were considered so risqué that they were not shown in the United States at first. She was the unfaithful bourgeoise in “La Ronde” (1950), an upscale Paris matron who takes a caddish young artist as her lover in “Adorable Créatures” (1952), and the sexually frustrated aristocrat’s wife in “L’Amant de Lady Chatterley” (1955), better known to English audiences as “Lady Chatterley’s Lover.”
    Continue reading the main story

    She said decades later that her favorite role was that of the hero’s matronly mistress in “Le Rouge et le Noir” (1954), based on Stendhal’s novel about class-conscious post-Napoleonic France.

    It was well known that Ms. Darrieux’s favorite director was Max Ophuls. After “La Ronde,” her first collaboration with Ophuls, they worked together in “Le Plaisir” (1952), about prostitutes on a country outing, and “Madame de … ” (1953), released in the United States as “The Earrings of Madame de … ,” a tale of jewelry, debt and infidelity.

    Ms. Darrieux became an international film star in Anatole Litvak’s “Mayerling” (1936), playing the teenage mistress of Rodolfo (Charles Boyer), crown prince of Austria, in a retelling of the Habsburg tragedy. American critics praised both her beauty and her performance. She was only 19, and it was her 19th film.

    Her new stardom was ratified by a timeless phenomenon: women around the world copied her hairstyle. “Danielle Darrieux appears with her hair bundled on top of her head in ‘Mayerling,’ ” Bosley Crowther wrote in The New York Times in 1938, reviewing another film entirely. “And a few months later, all the girls are building bird’s nests in their tresses.”
    I actually know her best from Five Fingers, one of my favorite spy thrillers:

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  14. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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  15. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Harry Stradling Jr., ‘The Way We Were’ Cinematographer, Dies at 92

    Harry Stradling Jr., a two-time Academy Award-nominated cinematographer for “1776” and “The Way We Were,” died Oct. 17 at the Motion Picture Home in Woodland Hills, Calif. He was 92.

    He was the son of cinematographer Harry Stradling, who has more than 130 credits to his name, including “A Streetcar Named Desire,” “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” and “My Fair Lady.” His great uncle was a cinematographer in the silent era, known for films starring Mary Pickford.

    “Harry was a giant in the business,” Steven Poster, president of the ICG said in a statement. “Between him and his father, they spanned almost the entire history of motion picture industry before the end of last century. I first remember his name from watching ‘Gunsmoke’ as a kid. When I first met him, it was like meeting a star, and I will never forget that.”

    During his prolific film career, Stradling Jr. worked heavily in Westerns, including cinematography for 87 episodes of “Gunsmoke,” 21 of the 23 episodes of “Cimarron Strip,” and the feature film “Support your Local Sheriff!”

    Stradling Jr. started out as a camera assistant and camera operator on George Cukor’s 1944 film “Gaslight.” Later, he worked with his dad on titles including, “Guys and Dolls,” “The Pajama Game,” and “Gypsy.”

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    Stradling Jr. scored an Oscar nomination in 1973 for the musical drama “1776,” and again in 1974 for “The Way We Were” starring Barbra Streisand and Robert Redford . He also received an Emmy nomination for the 1984 television miniseries “George Washington,” starring Barry Bostwick.

    His other credits include “Caddyshack II,” “Buddy Buddy,” “Carny," "Up the Academy,” “Midway,” and “With Six You Get Eggroll,” and the Muhammad Ali biopic “The Greatest.
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  16. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
  17. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

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    Dixie
  18. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
    Yes, but I am not allowed to create threads anymore, so I have to put stuff like this here.

    Sorry.
     
  19. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    No biggie

    I was unaware they have post-creation bans here. Surprised it hasn't happened to me yet.

    I would start a Music Board obit thread but I believe they've said they don't want one there.
     
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  20. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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    New Hampshire
    I would've started one myself, but can't at the moment.
     
  21. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Karin Dor, Bond Girl in 'You Only Live Twice,' Dies at 79

    Karin Dor, who played the red-haired villainess Helga Brandt in the 1967 James Bond film You Only Live Twice, died Monday in a nursing home in Munich, her son told the Bild newspaper. She was 79.

    The German beauty also had a key role as a revolutionary in the Alfred Hitchcock Cuban missile crisis thriller Topaz (1969) and appeared opposite Christopher Lee in The Invisible Dr. Mabuse (1962), one of more than a dozen films she made with her then-husband, Austrian director Harald Reinl.

    In her most famous role, Dor worked for the evil Blofeld (Donald Pleasence) as SPECTRE agent No. 11. Her character can't resist the advances of 007 (Sean Connery), then gets dropped into a pool of piranhas, paying the ultimate price for failing to dispose of the British spy.​

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  22. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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  23. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Liz Smith, longtime NYC gossip columnist who chronicled Trump divorce, dead at 94

    Liz Smith, who chronicled the gossip among New York City's rich and scandalous for 60 years and played a key role in the high-profile divorce between Donald and Ivana Trump, has died, the New York Post, her former employer, said. She was 94.

    Literary agent Joni Evans told The Associated Press she died in New York on Sunday of natural causes. Smith had recently suffered a stroke.

    For more than a quarter-century, Smith's column - titled "Liz Smith" - was one of the most widely read in the world. Its success was due in part to Smith's own celebrity status, giving her insider access.

    She started her own column at the New York Daily News in 1976. Known as the "Dame of Dish," Smith helped usher in the era of celebrity journalism in print and television.
     
  24. JozefK

    JozefK Forum Resident Thread Starter

    Location:
    Dixie
    Ann Wedgeworth, ‘Three’s Company’ Actress, Dies at 83

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    Ann Wedgeworth, known for her role as Lana Shields in ABC’s “Three’s Company,” died Thursday in New York after a long illness. She was 83.

    Wedgeworth’s career began in Broadway, with her debut in “Make a Million” in 1958. She continued to perform in off-Broadway and Broadway productions over the next few decades, winning a Tony Award for best performance by a featured actress in a play for her work in “Chapter Two.”

    The actress enjoyed a successful career in film, with roles as the leading lady in films like “Scarecrow,” opposite Gene Hackman, and “Bang the Drum Slowly” with Robert De Niro. Throughout the 1980s, she took on supporting roles, such as Patsy Cline’s mother in “Sweet Dreams,” with Jessica Lange and Ed Harris. The role earned her a National Society of Film Critics Award.

    Wedgeworth became best known for her role as divorcee Lana Shields in “Three’s Company,” after performing in numerous soap operas like “The Edge of Night” and “Another World.” Shields was written out of “Three’s Company” after only nine episodes with little explanation; Wedgeworth claimed she asked to be released from her contract after Shields’ role began to wind down.

    After “Three’s Company,” Wedgeworth went on to star in CBS’s “Evening Shade” starting in 1989, which was her longest role. She played Merleen Eldridge, the wife of small town doctor Harlan Eldrige. The couple was best friends with Burt Reynolds and Marilu Henner’s Wood and Ava Newton, who move back to the small town of Evening Shade, Ark. after Wood quits professional football due to an injury.

    Wedgeworth was married to actor and voice artist Rip Torn from 1955 to 1961, with whom she has one daughter. In 1970, she married acting coach Ernest Martin, with whom she had another daughter and stepson.

    She survived by Martin, her two daughters, and her stepson.
     
  25. MikaelaArsenault

    MikaelaArsenault Forum Resident

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