Listenin' to Jazz and Conversation

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Lonson, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. Six String

    Six String Senior Member

    NP Rhasan Roland Kirk - I Talk To The Spirits (Limelight)
    Orig. lp. One of my favorites from RRK, a real tour de force of jazz flute.
     
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  2. scompton

    scompton Forum Resident

    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I was a sporadic listener to jazz in the 8os and 90s. In general, I prefer jazz from the late 70s on than from the 50s and 60s.
     
  3. jerico

    jerico Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Nels Cline Singers: Instrumentals

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Lonson

    Lonson Don't get around much anymore Thread Starter

    Was a day with a lot of miles spent in the car taking Dad to a few appointments and to lunch and back to the country side again. In the car it was WCLV listener supported classical music station from Lorain. Now bact at home:

    Oscar Pettiford Orchestra "Deep Passion" Impulse
    [​IMG]

    Followed by
    Tommy Flanagan "Confirmation" Enja
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Moebius

    Moebius Forum Resident

    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Charles Lloyd - Passin' Thru (Blue Note 2017 lp)

    [​IMG]

    Picked this up last October on a whim. Really like the version of Dream Weaver.
     
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  6. BluTom

    BluTom Forum Resident

    Dave Holland & Pepe Habichuela- Hands
    [​IMG]
    Good Dave Holland here peoples. Jazz meets Flamenco.
     
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  7. Six String

    Six String Senior Member

    ^^^Another good album from the 80s. I was pointing at the Flanagan album but too slow on the save button.

    NP Stan Getz - Anniversary (Emarcy/Polygram)
    This one and Serenity recorded in 1987 and released in 1989 are two favorites from the latter part of Stan's career. Kenny Barron is superb throughout.

    Earlier I was running errands and listening to Al McKibbon's Tumbao Para Los Congueros Di Mi Vida (Blue Lady) cd
    Al's version of Estaté is superb.
     
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  8. Six String

    Six String Senior Member

    That would be my preference if I had to limit myself to specific decades, fortunately I don't.
     
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  9. Six String

    Six String Senior Member

    NP Art Farmer Quintet featuring Gigi Gryce (Prestige) OJC cd
    Also Duke Jordan, Addison Farmer and Philly Joe Jones.
     
  10. scompton

    scompton Forum Resident

    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I don’t limit myself to specific years either. I just prefer post fusion jazz to fusion and bop.
     
  11. yasujiro

    yasujiro Forum Resident

    Location:
    tokyo
    A dude is listening to Way Out West...

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. vanhooserd

    vanhooserd Forum Resident

    Location:
    Nashville,TN
    I saw Getz & Barron at the Atlanta Jazz Festival in the 80s with George Mraz & Al Foster. At the time I was a little disappointed. Maybe my expectations were too high. Now I really like (and have most of) his 80s recordings & wish I could experience that afternoon performance again.
     
  13. Joe F

    Joe F Forum Resident

    Location:
    Dallas TX USA
    On tap for tonight.[​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  14. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident

    So true. This year I went looking for Joanne Brackeen's Ancient Dynasty, but it's OOP and never available digitally I think. At least that was cheap and easy to find a mint copy of it...I wanted a copy of Anthony Davis' Lady of the Mirrors, which is findable on both vinyl and the expanded reissue, but at a not cheap price. Billy Bang's Changing Seasons? One available at the moment on Discogs for $300. A lot of the Black Saint/Soul Note stuff though is readily available, so a lot of the David Murray stuff and Don Pullen stuff and Muhal Richard Abrams stuff. And there's some stuff that's not in print in any hard copy edition, but is available for download or streaming.
     
  15. Craig's Story

    Craig's Story Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canada
    I agree , Blak Saint / Soul Note have created an amazing catalogue -that was so strong in the 80s
    And of course the records still sound so good , as they were always all analogue
    Not sure why they are not talked about more (or even treasured as say a Blue Note or Impulse )
     
  16. Craig's Story

    Craig's Story Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canada
    This reminds me of the amazing Julius Hemphill records of this era
    Going to listen to a couple now ...
     
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  17. chervokas

    chervokas Forum Resident


    To be honest, I've always had mixed feeling about the sonics on WOW. There's too much of a left-right split, but it was the earliest days of stereo so the thought about a stereo sound field wasn't really on too may people's minds. There's reverb on the horn track, but not on the rhythm track, which is super dry as a matter of fact (because of course Contemporary was literally recording in a closet, or at least a shipping room). Those drums are very present, but also sound like they're being played in a box, which they kind of were if you look at a photo of the room from the Contemporary Leaders session:

    [​IMG]

    But, I will say as my room treatments and audio gear have improved, the album reveals more an more of the room/space/center fill on rim shots and ride symbol. And like I said, I don't think there's any better recording of acoustic bass on a jazz record in the '50s for punch, depth and frequency extension.
     
  18. Craig's Story

    Craig's Story Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canada
    I understand your day , as a care giver , and always look forwards to the music at the end . Many times it includes Tommy Flanagan - a favorite is “Jazz Poet “
     
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  19. bluejimbop

    bluejimbop Forum Resident

    Location:
    Castro Valley, CA
    :cry:
     
  20. bluejimbop

    bluejimbop Forum Resident

    Location:
    Castro Valley, CA
    Saw this trio in the "Coffee Gallery" at MJF, years back. Aw yeah.
     
  21. cedarbrew

    cedarbrew Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    [​IMG]

    The Brothers Montgomery.
     
  22. brimuchmuze

    brimuchmuze Forum Resident

    Can't argue, but somehow Columbia found a way to release albums by Henry Threadgill, David S Ware, James Blood Ulmer as well back then. Even licensing releases from DIW.
     
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  23. yasujiro

    yasujiro Forum Resident

    Location:
    tokyo
    In the 80s, John Zorn was a brilliant new comer.

     
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  24. Tribute

    Tribute Forum Resident

    With these music corporations, I believe it takes real people, specific individuals at a company to move music toward an actual release. Even in the 80's and 90's, the corporations had serious music people in their employ, sometimes even at the very top. Every year a greater and greater percentage of them were gone and replaced by MBA's and lawyers with less interest in the art of the music. Fortunately now and then these purely business types would license out older recordings....but new artists, new recordings, not so much. They may go with a proven artist, often an old timer, a star. But even many of the stars are struggling to get their releases out.

    The average time between major releases by the stars has gone from the typical 6 months (never more than a year) back in the 1960's and 1970's to a typical 3 to 5 years today. Once in a while there is an artist who puts out something every year or two, but that is a rarity. They are called prolific. If you went 12-18 months between releases in the 60's to 70's, you risked being forgotten and passed by. If you went two years, people called it an attempted comeback and wondered what was wrong with you.

    At one time, the cigar chomping company heads were either music fans themselves or were willing to try almost any artist, any style to sell a record. 500 copies? Hey, that still made a little money. Maybe the next one would sell 10,000, maybe the one after that 100,000. But they tried everything. Today, the corporations need their MBAs to approve anything, and not very much makes it past their muster. They want BIG now!

    Artists cannot always afford the $30,000 it may cost to produce their own private label release. But thankfully they try. I have met many who need to borrow money to get there, and end up in the red.

    My big problem with this modern approach is that really fine artists can never build a real legacy of recordings. In the first 10 years of their career (the critical period) they may have a total of 4 releases, maybe even less. At one time, a 10 year career would often include 20 albums. That did not mean diluted quality. It virtually always meant more quality music overall
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  25. xybert

    xybert Forum Resident

    Roscoe Mitchell - Old/Quartet Sessions

    [​IMG]
     
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