Sinatra Vs. Other Male Interpreters of the Great American Songbook

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by ShockControl, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. kennyluc1

    kennyluc1 Well-Known Member

    I like early Mathis, 1950's. Don't care for his attempts at soul (Me And Mrs. Jones) his Greatest Hits is good enough for me.
     
  2. Ken E.

    Ken E. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Providence NJ
    Francis Albert Sinatra, the greatest entertainer of the second half of the 20th century. Once he does a song it belongs to him. There have been other great singers like Bennett, Cole, Crosby but none compare to him as an entertainer.
     
    Bob F and bozburn like this.
  3. rockerreds

    rockerreds Well-Known Member

    Jack Jones,to me,is the best of this field.
    I also like Frank,Bing,Tony,Johnny,Nat.
     
  4. bozburn

    bozburn Forum Resident

    Location:
    Covington, GA
    Jack Jones is a recent discovery for me. A fresh, smooth voice with its own style. His appearances on the Judy Garland Show on YouTube are a fun watch.
     
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  5. nancybrooke

    nancybrooke Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Seattle, WA, USA
    There's a good essay about Jack in Will Friedwald's A Biographical Guide to the Great Jazz and Pop Singers, a massive book about artists who sang the Great American Songbook (recommended if you're really really into pop singers). He seems to get overlooked - worth catching one of his shows, while you still can.
     
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  6. bilgewater

    bilgewater Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Michigan
    Oh of course I know those singers too. I was referring to the mainstream retro pop singers of our time rather than the classic and contemporary jazz singers you note and the outward bound vocal artist bleckmann.

    Elling, for one, can really drive a big band. Most impressive.
     
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  7. jimac51

    jimac51 Forum Resident

    Location:
    allentown,pa.
    I worked in BMG's Foglesville,Pa. hits warehouse back when Rod's tiptoe into the GAS started.We were all given a copy of the first one(even the temps got one,to go along with all of their stolen CDs)and told my boss there might be a recall of product.Asking why,I told him there was a distinct whirring sound throughout the album."Whirring sound?",he queried.Yeah,it's the sound of Sinatra,spinning in his grave.He passed that remark onto some powers that were in the distribution link,but not to Clive Davis.
     
  8. DLant

    DLant The Dap-Gort Staff

    Location:
    Upstate New York
    :righton:
     
  9. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    Iggy Pop's favourite album of Frank's is September Of My Years.
     
  10. rangerjohn

    rangerjohn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    chicago, il

    I think that this is well-put. Crosby was the overall better artist and overall a bigger star than FS. But Sinatra was by far the better singer, as Crosby often conceded. And Frank couldn't touch Crosby as either a dramatic or comedic actor, which I'm sure FS knew.
     
  11. rangerjohn

    rangerjohn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    chicago, il
    I've heard him do a great cover of "One For My Baby."

    FS actually has an enormous constituency among rock artists: I've posted somewehere on this Forum written reflections on Sinatra by Dylan, Bono and Elvis Costello. Springsteen is a big fan as well.
     
  12. rangerjohn

    rangerjohn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    chicago, il
    Spot on about Ella, I think. And that Sinatra-Jobim performance is riveting. Plus, unlike on the record, he actually pronounces "Ipanema" correctly.
     
    MMM likes this.
  13. rangerjohn

    rangerjohn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    chicago, il
    I think that this is a key difference between Bing and Frank as well. Bing at some point stopped hiring arrangers who inspired or, especially, challenged him.
     
  14. rangerjohn

    rangerjohn Well-Known Member

    Location:
    chicago, il
    Sorry for all the posts. I somehow missed this thread.....
     
  15. zphage

    zphage Forum Resident

    Location:
    Bucks County, PA
    Sammy Davis though seen as a clown prince
    had the vocal power Frank didn't
    plus phrasing and swing to match Frank easily
     
  16. frankfan1

    frankfan1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Western Tennessee
    I was listening to the Bing/ Buddy Bregman album today, thinking about this. It may be the way it's mastered, but Bing seems almost drowned. I would have loved more big, brassy albums with Bing, especially at that time with the timbre he had.
     
  17. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    I think Frank's rivals not as a showman but have that unique signature voice are Armstrong, Holiday and Bennett.
     
  18. jimac51

    jimac51 Forum Resident

    Location:
    allentown,pa.
    I've hot a huge amount of Frank in my collection(more than any other act) but I lived through pop music from the 1950s on and appreciate other examples of songs done by Frank that were done,well, better.One example is "Fly Me To The Moon",which Frank came to the trough kinda late(by ten years).I suspect casual listeners to this song only know Frank's version,but is merely close second compared to Nat Cole's majestic,romantic string laden version featuring George Shearing.Even Frank's seemingly iconic The Lady Is A Tramp has a number of truly great different intrepretations;I'll take Buddy Greco's take to rank right up there.Frank might eventually win the battle,but it would be a close decision through a 15 rounder.One more-Mack the Knife,which, even on Frank's studio verison,he acknowledges Armstrong and Darin(the males,here)as masters,and Frank is right.
    My point is that it is the song should come first and the singer second.Keeping the GAS alive means its relevance in 2014 needs new blood,just not Rod Stewart's iron poor variety.
     
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  19. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    Did anyone mention Barry Manilow? :)
     
  20. Ken E.

    Ken E. Forum Resident

    Location:
    New Providence NJ
    I could not agree more with your penultimate statement. And yes, maybe not every song...
     
  21. Bob M

    Bob M Active Member

    Location:
    Canada
    Another one I would say is worth mentioning is Vic Damone. Though not on everyone's radar these days, he had an incredible voice and a pure approach to the standards.
     
  22. alexpop

    alexpop Power pop + other bad habits....

    All depends on the song. How many singers could swing like Frank ?
     
  23. frankfan1

    frankfan1 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Western Tennessee
    Shame that many of Jack Jones' earlier recordings never made it to CD until they became EU public domain releases. A marvelous, pure voice.

    The only disappointment I had with him was "The Gershwin Album." For some reason that album misses the mark for me.
     
  24. jimac51

    jimac51 Forum Resident

    Location:
    allentown,pa.
    Sammy,Darin & Greco,to name three.Sometimes Torme,though I'm not a big fan.
    Swinging is not always the main criteria.But a sense of timing is a prerequisite.That's why Fred Astaire was the one who introduced so many songbook titles first,via films.Some don't appreciate Astaire,but after many years and repeated viewings,thanks to Turner Classic Movies,I get it.
     
    bozburn likes this.
  25. bozburn

    bozburn Forum Resident

    Location:
    Covington, GA
    Buddy Greco's another often-overlooked male voice of this period. His Reprise album Big Bands & Ballads was my first exposure to his great voice, another exquisite album, including two tunes from Nat Cole's Wild is Love record.
     

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