TV Calibration

Discussion in 'Visual Arts' started by Sgt Pepper, Jul 23, 2017.

  1. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    There are still people using the VT60 for video mastering in LA, and it's almost a broadcast standard (for a display in this price range). Very good plasma set.
     
  2. John Moschella

    John Moschella Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Christiansburg, VA
    I'm with you on this. For the money that folks spend on a flat panels you can get a great FP for around 3k these days.
    You do need the space.
     
  3. I know a guy.......
     
  4. arley

    arley Well-Known Member

    I'm roughly 3 hours away from either Atlanta GA or Charlotte NC, about a half hour from Augusta GA. Anyone know of any good calibrators that travel through this area? I bought the set (Panasonic VT60) from Best Buy, but I don't know how good their Geek Squad techs are.

    Although the Best Buy web page states that the tech is ISF certified and charge for the service is $249. Sound right?
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2017
  5. jh901

    jh901 Forum Resident

    No. It's one thing to get an ISF certification, but experience is an entirely different matter. You will be better off saving that $250 until a traveling pro visits. Get in touch with Chad at the link if interested in setting a date:

    LINK
     
  6. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    I was just chatting with my cousin about my new 65" OLED and I mentioned how my standards for TV size have changed so much. 15 years ago, my 36" Sony WEGA 4X3 set seemed huge.

    Then I got my 50" Panny plasma and it seemed huge.

    Then I got my 60" Panny plasma... and it didn't seem that big. Really didn't feel like a big jump over the 50".

    Then I got my 65" LG OLED and don't even notice the size difference. Watching it, the set just doesn't seem "big" to me period - I've gotten so used to TVs that size-ish that 65" doesn't appear impressive.

    25 years ago, I got a 27" 4X3 set and it seemed too big - now I have a 65" 16X9 set and it seems too small! :help:
     
  7. drgn95

    drgn95 Active Member

    Also consider that with newer tv's you get firmware updates that once installed can tweek your picture throwing your colors out of calibration. Maybe not a lot but something to be aware of.
     
  8. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    I can remember in the late 1980s when the Sony 32" Trinitron tube sets came out (at a premium price), people were stunned with the size and would ask me, "why would you ever need a set this huge?"

    The other thing I find very thought-provoking is that it wasn't that long ago that even a 50" flat screen would cost you $10,000. Now, I think you can buy a better-performing set of the same size for 1/10th of that price.

    I just switched from a 42" to a 55" in my home studio, and I'm a little overwhelmed. :eek:
     
  9. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    I had one of those, and they were huge! But they were huge (and heavy) as three dimensional objects, shaped like a cube. Very unwieldy. The new 60" plus screens seem less huge because they're essentially two dimensional objects, especially the OLEDs with their thin image-on-glass construction.
     
  10. jh901

    jh901 Forum Resident


    It is small. For movies. The screen height for Scope on a 65" 16X9 is 24". You will need to sit about 5' away and that isn't going to work (too close for surround system, etc).

    People will continue to buy the latest and greatest panels. Easier to come up with new tech acronyms than to devise an ultra short throw front projector and then market it in a way that it becomes the new normal.
     
  11. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    A friend's 27" 4X3 set died a few years ago, and I had to badger her to "go big" with a 32" 16X9 set. She wanted something more like 25" - she just thought that 32" set was huge and overwhelming! :laugh:
     
    Vidiot likes this.
  12. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    When I got my first LD player in 1991, I watched "Ben-Hur" on a 15" 4X3 set. Don't try to tell me my 65" plasma is too small! :D
     
    Vidiot and robertzombie like this.
  13. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    As you said earlier, it's amazing how used to a large set you can get in a week or two. I'm still a little overwhelmed with the 55" OLED, but it's working out OK. I discovered even if the calibration settings are copied to all inputs, you still have to manually go in and turn off the enhancement, the NR, the motion compensation, and all that crap. Once you do it, it's nice to see an honest picture with out any unnecessary tweakery going on.
     
    Oatsdad likes this.
  14. Sgt Pepper

    Sgt Pepper Well-Known Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Loving it that so many here are taking the time to set their TV's/PJ's up correctly.. I still own a Panasonic ST60 PDP that has incredible PQ (mind you I have calibrated the hell out of it over the years lol).
    Just wondering if anyone here has followed the Value Electronics TV shootouts over the years?

    There is an excellent test pattern download for free here, great for beginers or more advanced calibration:
    AVS HD 709 - Blu-ray & MP4 Calibration - AVS Forum | Home Theater Discussions And Reviews
     
  15. Rocker

    Rocker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I'm no expert, but I think one of the most important things about setting up a new TV is something that you can easily do yourself.... turn off that horrid motion interpolation! (a.k.a. the "Soap Opera Effect"). An utterly worthless setting that shouldn't even be included to begin with.
     
    eddiel likes this.
  16. eddiel

    eddiel Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Tell me about it. Why do they even add it? Must be a reason.
     
  17. Vidiot

    Vidiot Now in 4K HDR!

    Location:
    Hollywood, USA
    All the automatic stuff is crrrrrrrrrap.

    Here's a short list of what to turn off in the LG OLEDs:

    Dynamic Contrast off
    Super Resolution off
    Color Gamut auto
    Edge Enhancer on
    Color Filter off
    NR off
    MPEG NR off
    Black Level low
    Real Cinema off
    Motion Eye Care off
    TruMotion off

    Note this is just my opinion as to what you should turn off. The AVS Forum routinely has long, involved threads on which controls to leave on and which to turn off. I just don't want any crap happening to the picture (but I don't mind a very tiny amount of enhancement, which appears to do almost nothing to the picture).
     
  18. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    It's an attempt to smooth out motion. When you have slow panning shots on film (24fps), you usually get a lot of stuttering, ie choppy motion. This is one of the limitations of filmed content's slow frame rate when playing back on TV screens.

    The setting tries to smooth out the motion by adding synthetic (interpolated) frames. This processing, when overdone, can produce the SOE. Generally the setting has a range of values and if you set it on minimum, the SOE usually isn't that noticeable (depending on manufacturer implementation). But yes, OFF is the best setting. :)
     
    eddiel likes this.
  19. Heavy Music

    Heavy Music Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Florida
    I was under the impression that maximized motion smoothing was primarily used for fast action sports viewing, no?
     
  20. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    Yeah, that too. It that case, motion interpolation can lead to smearing effects, where a trail is left behind fast moving objects (if overdone). But either way, it's an attempt to smooth out motion artifacts.
     
    Heavy Music likes this.
  21. adm62

    adm62 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
  22. Heavy Music

    Heavy Music Forum Resident

    Location:
    South Florida
  23. Ghostworld

    Ghostworld Forum Resident

    Location:
    US
    When I got my new plasma, I tortured myself for three weeks calibrating the TV. I think the whole calibration thing is maddening if you try to do it yourself, because sometimes you'll do a recommended setting and you won't like it at all. I imagine if you paid someone to come calibrated you're going to think "well that's as good as it gets" and therefore not go through tinkering with it anymore and eventually your eyes just get adjusted to that one setting. I ran a calibration disc and it looked good but it was just boring to my eyes. Finally I copied the recommended setting for my set from CNET. it was pretty good but I just wanted a hair more contrast -- so a minor tweak and I was happy. You might look around for your model TV and see if see if CNET or another AV forum has some recommended settings for it. It's what finally bailed me out and ended the fiddling madness.
     
    Heavy Music likes this.
  24. Deesky

    Deesky Forum Resident

    TV calibration settings are not transferable across all TVs of the same model. TVs coming off the same production line will not be identical, let alone across different production runs. Each set should be individually calibrated for best results.

    Another issue that people often overlook even if they've had their screens professionally calibrated, is that screen performance drifts over time (a few years, say). This was especially true of plasmas which tended to lose brightness and saturation after a few years. You may not necessarily notice it because the decline is gradual and you adapt to it, but if you were to get the set re-calibrated, you would have very different settings compared to the original calibration.
     
    robertzombie likes this.
  25. Rocker

    Rocker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Thanks for the recommendations, I'll take a look at my settings and see how they compare. :)
     

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