Audiophile fuses or standard Bussman fuses ?

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Soundlabs, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. Ilusndweller

    Ilusndweller S.H.M.F.=>Reely kewl.

    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    I could rip the nonsense written about the A.M. beeswax fuses (Synergistic Research B.S., etcetcetc) to shreds. Not about to waste my time. Suckers...
     
    Agitater likes this.
  2. Tim 2

    Tim 2 MORE MUSIC PLEASE

    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    I found a very slight improvement in sound quality but when I checked the fuses a couple years later they were very corroded. Took them out and stayed away from this tweak.
     
  3. Gibsonian

    Gibsonian Forum Resident

    Location:
    Iowa, USA
    I bought a high dollar fuse for my phono pre, no difference. I bought the oil, and I won't do it again. My brain said no but I went ahead anyway. Silly. Anyhow, I have first hand knowledge anyway. The expectation bias is strong in our group, I tell ya.
     
    jtw likes this.
  4. Swann36

    Swann36 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    This is taken from the Audiophile Man website under an article ...Russ Andrews Superfuse is it a bird ?

    Russ Andrews SuperFuse: IS IT A BIRD...? - The Audiophile Man

    this part comes in the comments where Paul Rigby is a rare reviewer in that he actually answers coments and then takes the responsibility chase up Russ Andrews to get an answer to a readers question .... for those that want to know the answer of the type of fuse that is used its Bussman ....

    'Right, I have some information and answers regarding this fuse issue. To begin and before we get to Russ Andrews itself, let me reassure those readers who are a bit bemused by all of this fuse palaver. The notion of producing a fuse specifically rated for hi-fi use is not a new one and is by no means unusual. Hi-Fi fuses have been around for a quite a while and many audiophiles feature them in their chains. There are many hi-fi manufacturers out there producing fuses for hi-fi use: the Furutech TF series is one popular type as are the Hi-Fi Tuning Gold fuse plus the AMR Gold fuses and so on. It’s not a new concept, by any means and prices per fuse can hit around £100 a pop.
    That said, I talked to Russ Andrews and voiced my concerns and asked several questions regarding the so called ‘revelation’ that it is using a Bussmann fuse as the basis for its SuperFuse.
    There seems to be a school of thought circulating around social media that, because the Bussmann fuse is the basis of the SuperFuse then, ergo, that fuse is merely a basic quality, ten-a-penny item and Russ Andrews is ripping everyone off. I think that, if Russ Andrews wanted to rip anyone off, the company wouldn’t be stupid enough to simply cover the Bussmann fuse with a bit of foil or whatever it used as a wrapper in order to ‘get away with it’. That was my first observation before I even talked to the company.
    The facts are these. Before the SuperFuse was released, when it was still at the development stage, Russ Andrews bought in around 10 or so, ready-made and ready to go, fuses from a variety of companies from all over the world (Bussmann was just one of those 10). The aim was to find the best sounding basic fuse currently for sale on the market. This group testing of components for future installation or tweaking is not unusual. Many companies do the same with capacitors, resistors, volume controls, etc.
    Bussmann – as you may know – make many fuse types and configurations. The fuse that Russ Andrews selected as the best of the tested bunch (the one that’s on sale now via RA) was a Bussmann fuse. The current variant of that has nickel-plated end caps and with a silver-plated copper wire running through it.
    To confirm then, Russ Andrews do not add these features (i.e.: the nickel end caps or the silver-plated copper wire). Bussman has already done this.
    What Russ Andrews did was to take that fuse and put it through its own proprietry Super Burn-in process. The process was primarily developed by Russ Andrews while the design and build of the machine was carried out by Ben Duncan Research. Super Burn In is a treatment process, as adding DCT-type cryogenics to cables and hi-fi components is a well known and used treatment. RA’s treatment offers some similarities but remains unique, though.
    It’s this process and this process alone that turns the Bussmann fuse into a SuperFuse. It’s this process which, says Russ Andrews, justifies the asking price. Of course you, as a potential consumer, might beg to differ. But that’s your right and choice.
    Does the processes make a difference? In my opinion, though my ears and using my reference hi-fi chain, yes. It’s not perfect and can be qualified under certain circumstances but it does work. In fact, you can read the above review to see exactly how.
    As to why the Bussmann chassis was used at all? Two reasons. Reason one? Cost. To independently produce a new fuse from the ground up and then to sell relatively few would not make economic sense. It would cost hundreds of thousands if not millions while the final saleable fuse would be extremely expensive. Bussmann has economies of scale behind it here.
    Second reason? Safety. The chassis tube has to pass British safety standards (you can see the relevant sign on any fuse you buy from a shop). The tube has to reach a certain standard in terms of materials and quality. Otherwise, it’s a tiny but effective death trap. To modify a perfectly working Bussmann was quicker and cheaper than starting from scratch but also safer.
    I think there was also a potential issue raised regarding the hand polished end caps. Russ Andrews, as a company, used to hand polish the end caps of an earlier version of the SuperFuse they produced which was silver plated (I spoke to the poor bloke who used to polish them!) The reason was that silver can oxidise and so hand polishing was done to prevent that. This current variant uses nickel end-capped fuse. It is different in that it does not require hand polishing. You can see HERE that there is no mention of hand polishing of the current SuperFuse. The addition of the DeoxIT wipe is a welcome one. DeoxIT is a contact cleaner that I would highly recommend (in fact, I recall reviewing that company’s spray in HiFi World magazine in the past). It’s great for the SuperFuse but also to clean all of your inputs and outputs. It removes contamination and the mucky build-up of grease and dirt and improves performances all on its own.
    If you like the notion of hi-fi fuses then the Russ Andrews SuperFuse is actually pretty good value for money. It’s certainly a lot cheaper than many of its contemporaries.
    During my conversation with Russ Andrews, I asked several searching questions, challenged it on a few points and placed ‘requests for information’ to it and received satisfactory answers for each. I, for one, am happy with the company’s co-operation and replies.'

    I have no connection to Paul Rigby or Russ Andrews other than reading Audiophile man and buying RAs powercables & extension sockets ....oh i do not have any Superfuses except those that came in bought powerkords ...
     
  5. Swann36

    Swann36 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lincoln, UK
    I've cleaned all my connections with a combination of 99% alchohol and deoxit especially the fuses & holders, this i feel has as much impact in improving the or maintaining the sound i'm hearing on my system as perhaps a new HIFI fuse would simply by making a clean / good contact ..
     
  6. Ilusndweller

    Ilusndweller S.H.M.F.=>Reely kewl.

    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio
    As someone with 2 degrees in materials science engineering, I often find myself wondering WTF the shmarketing shnonsense I read is even trying to say. I see how they write their crap to appeal to the yahoos, what BS.
     
  7. DiggyGun

    DiggyGun Member

    Location:
    UK
    A number of manufacturers, including Naim advise leaving on 24/7, but switching off for electrical storms and extended periods of non-use, e.g. holidays. Mine have been on for years and all the forums I’m on, never seen an issue reported by leaving on 24/7.
     
  8. DiggyGun

    DiggyGun Member

    Location:
    UK

    Cheapest upgrade ever. Unplugging and replugging every connection about 20 times. Also check the tightness of rack fittings and speaker bolts, feet, etc. Do mine about every six months.
     
    The FRiNgE likes this.
  9. classicrocker

    classicrocker Life is good!

    Location:
    Worcester, MA, USA
    Just because you have never seen an issue or read about one does not mean there is no risk. You may never see an issue but as a safety engineer for 34 years I have seen enough negative field issues to make me cautious about leaving a product powered 24/7. I have seen issues with products that have been in the field 10-20 years so it can happen at any time in the life of a product.

    With well-made products, the risk is very low but there is always risk. You have to decide if you are comfortable taking it. Based on my experience I will turn my electronics off. YMMV
     
  10. DiggyGun

    DiggyGun Member

    Location:
    UK
    Similarly, working in the electrical engineering / safety / quality world since the early 80s. I appreciate your comments. However, for sound quality, I will continue to leave on.
     
  11. classicrocker

    classicrocker Life is good!

    Location:
    Worcester, MA, USA
    I am not telling you what to do mate as I am just sharing my experience with the community here. Everyone has to decide the level of risk they are comfortable with and your YMMV.
     
  12. The FRiNgE

    The FRiNgE Forum Resident

    Yes! I watched my Yamaha CD-X2 go up in smoke right before my eyes! It had been in service for several years, and was a "pretty good" sounding player for its time. It was not on 24/7, but was just idling when it began smoking (power never went out, a fuse never opened) So, I opened it up to investigate. The plastic chassis had melted beyond repair, but most amazing of all, NO fuse.. it was designed without one. Even with a fuse, a device still could overheat and catch fire. The risk is much lower but can happen.

    Part II of my story, I was working on a job site in my younger days as an electrician's helper. We had the pool filter on a temp line, 12-2 romex on a 20 amp ground fault breaker. The finish carpenters had made a pile of saw dust just outside the garage door. The temp romex had become pinched in the door hinge adjacent to the saw dust. We can see the hazard of this, a flammable substance and a potential source of ignition? The wire caught fire, and so did the sawdust. The door had pinched the conductors, into a sharp right angle bend which lowers the ampacity of the conductor.

    The wire heated up like a resistor (such as an electric heater)
    The breaker never tripped!!!!

    I immediately stomped the sawdust fire out, but the wire flamed up again just as quickly. So quick thinking, I ran to the panel to throw the breaker, then stomped the fire out... The house could have burned down.

    Well engineered audio products have redundant fusing. Look inside a Pioneer amp or receiver from the 70's ... lots of internal fuses which protect the various stages of circuitry.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2020
    Swann36 likes this.
  13. Andy Saunders

    Andy Saunders Forum Resident

    Location:
    England
    l purchased a poncy Furutech internal fuse for one of my Virtue Audio Sensations and it did make a slight improvement l have to say- not that l ever put that out on a public forum.:D
     

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