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Classical Corner Classical Music Corner (thread #26)

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, Jun 14, 2011.

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  1. Jay F

    Jay F New Member

    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    It took me three pass-bys before I realized this wasn't a pic of Richard Simmons.
     
  2. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    My first Mahler was Neumann's M5. Back when I was in the record business (nothing glam, just distribution) I could buy LPs cheap, especially "budget" labels like Vanguard. So one of many was this M5. Truth is I was more interested in the Berg Wozzeck excerpts on side 4 than the Mahler. I thought it was time I dipped my beak into some Second Viennese School.

    I liked the Mahler, especially the trumpet opening -- that sticks with everyone I think. Otherwise it didn't thrill me enough to change my world the way Solti's CSO M2 did from the library in the mid-nineties. THEN I started to pay attention.
     

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  3. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Now playing:
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Growl

    Growl Member

    Location:
    South of France
  5. John S

    John S Forum Resident

    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Beethoven Box Today:

    Beethoven

    CD22
    Serenade in D, Op. 25
    For flute, violin and viola
    Rondo in G, WoO41
    For violin and piano
    Trio in E-flat Hess 48
    For violin, cello and piano
    Adagio in E-flat WoO43 No. 2
    Sonatina in C WoO44 No. 1
    Sonatina in C minor WoO43 No. 1
    Andante con variazioni in D WoO44 No. 2

    Above 4 for mandolin and piano

    Various musicians
    (Op. 25 recorded 1990, St. Silas Church, London
    Rondo and Trio recorded 2007 Bauer Studios Ludwigsburg, Germany
    WoO43, No. 2 and Sonatina in C WoO44 recorded Germany 1973
    Sonatina WoO43 and Andante WoO44 recorded 1995 licensed from Hungaroton)

    CD23
    Piano Quartet in C WoO36
    Piano Quartet in E-flat WoO56 No. 1
    Piano Quartet in D WoO36 No. 2


    Cummings String Trio
    With Anthony Goldstone, piano
    (recorded 1986 St. Olave’s School Orpington, UK

    One wonders why LvB wrote those mandolin pieces. Was the instrumant that popular amongst parlor amateurs?

    All this is early LvB, and is pleasant classical style.
     

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  6. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Early Beethoven is great! It's like Haydn.
     
  7. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    That's the Toscanini Set. If it's Decca and it's Aida and it's HVK, then it's the recording with Leontyne Price, and that's the greatest Aida on disc. I can't stand HVK on general principles, but that's still the best Aida in the catalog.
     
  8. jimsumner

    jimsumner Forum Resident

    Location:
    Raleigh, NC, USA
    I think more highly of the Kubelik cycle. It certainly was/is a bit different. Smaller orchestra, quicker tempos, lighter textures, less bloated, less interested in profoundity. Consider it a palate cleanser. Shouldn't be anyone's first Mahler cycle but it certainly has earned its place.
     
  9. no.nine

    no.nine (not his real name)

    Location:
    NYC
    Now Playing:

    [​IMG]

    Guillaume Dumanoir / Michel Mazuel / Mr. de la Voye - Suites d'Orchestre (1650-1660)

    Jordi Savall, Le Concert des Nations (Fontalis/Auvidis ES 9908)


    I found this used some time ago and bought it because it just seemed to exude an interesting vibe when I looked at it, don't know why. So I took a chance, and I really enjoy it.

    I hadn't heard of any of these composers, but much of the music here reminds me of the Terpsichore discs I have. Does anyone have any thoughts they can share? Or is this one too obscure?
     
  10. coopmv

    coopmv Newton 1/30/2001 - 8/31/2011

    Location:
    CT, USA
    Now playing the following CD - another version of Chopin Nocturnes, which just arrived today from Presto Classical for a first listen ...

    [​IMG]
     
  11. SBurke

    SBurke Nostalgia Junkie

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Has anyone seen details on this "Karajan 60" set? I cannot find anything other than the listing, price, that is will have 82 discs or something like that.
     
  12. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    It's a DG set, so perhaps this is the 60th time the material has been reissued? :winkgrin:
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Slave to the rhythm

    Location:
    Berlin, Germany
    Details for all CDs here:

    http://www.asiandb.com/store/detail.php?num=15444

    - A luxurious box set of 82 CDs containing Karajan's 1960's recordings in original LP sleeves
    - 320 page booklet featuring biography, original liner notes, and repertories (written in Korean, English and Japanese)
    - Includes many unavailable recordings

    [​IMG]
     
  14. SBurke

    SBurke Nostalgia Junkie

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    I know, right?

    I think when the reissue department holds its quarterly meeting with the marketing department, they put my picture on the wall. "Gentlemen, this is the target."
     
  15. SBurke

    SBurke Nostalgia Junkie

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    Thank you sir! Looks very nice . . .
     
  16. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    This is good news! Overall, his 60s recordings are the best of his DG stuff.

    I already have lots of the stuff in that set, thankfully, as I sure can't afford the price.
     
  17. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Now playing:
     

    Attached Files:

  18. john greenwood

    john greenwood Well-Known Member

    Location:
    NYC
    Listening to "Les Adieux" (Brendel) on my iPod as I type this.
     
  19. Growl

    Growl Member

    Location:
    South of France
    I'll rent it at the library and give it a try.

    I just received my set of Mozart's Piano Concertos by Uchida on Decca. It's a delight. So much to discover... Also got Bartok's string quartets and Beethoven's triple concerto and I don't even know if I'll have enough time tonight to listen to most of it all. I opened Pandora's box with classical CDs, but I should beware, it might close my bank account :yikes:
     
  20. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    I understand your rejection of HVK on principle, but he was the best opera conductor in the world when he led that Aida.

    The Brilliant Beethoven Box we've been talking about as of late is one of the best collections of Beethoven from anyone. Strong recommendation, particularly in consideration of your avatar. Right now Amazon is offering the 85 CD set for $117, and another outlet via Amazon offers it for $102.
     
  21. Growl

    Growl Member

    Location:
    South of France
    I've got good chunks of Beethoven already, all symphonies by Furtwangler (some twice, I've got the war recordings box and the EMI Great Recordings set) and Toscanini, the 9th & Triple Concerto by Fricsay, all piano sonatas & concertos by Brendel + his Diabelli variations, "Fidelio" by Furtwangler, the Missa Solemnis by Klemperer, the string quartets by the Alban Berg Quartet and the piano-violin sonatas by Grumiaux & Haskil. I prefer purchasing individual recordings, I wouldn't have much choice later with a box, I'll stay with that kind of box and wouldn't go further, and I like to have small items so I can get them out of my shoe boxes and listen to them. It's complicated with a box, you have to get it out and find what you want inside...

    Based on my list above, where can I go now with Beethoven ? What's left to listen ?
     
  22. George P

    George P Notable Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    1. Piano Trios - Beaux Arts Trio

    2. An alternate, more "intense" version of the sonatas and concertos, like with Annie Fischer (or Schnabel, Naxos) in the sonatas and R. Serkin (or Schnabel, Naxos) in the concertos.

    3. Cello Sonatas - Richter/Rostropovich
     
  23. Growl

    Growl Member

    Location:
    South of France
    Thanks for your time and advice. I'll go to the Piano Trios first. Love the solo piano and concertos.
     
  24. Jay F

    Jay F New Member

    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I love her Mozart, concertos and sonatas.
     
  25. Robin L

    Robin L Musical Omnivore

    Location:
    Fresno, California
    Do you have a good stereo copy of the nine symphonies? I'd vote for Blomstedt/Dresden, it's in the Brilliant box and otherwise widely available, new and used and usually remarkably cheap. To be perfectly honest, I like it much better than Toscanini and Furtwängler, it's much better played and the sound is so much better it isn't funny.

    Barenboim's Symphony Cycle with the Staatskapelle Berlin has fantastic sound and performances very much in the manner of Furtwängler. The Brilliant Box has the Vox Brendel recordings of the solo keyboard works so that would probably be a wash. However, I concur with George about Annie Fischer. As far as I'm concerned, Schnabel has been dethroned.
     
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