Classical Corner Classical Music Corner

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by George P, May 29, 2015.

  1. Rose River Bear

    Rose River Bear Forum Resident

    I don't have that but I have the four disc Dutoit Ravel set.
     
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  2. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    I would seek out an original copy of the LP in clean condition. The recording itself wasn’t great but the performance was. I do not think remastering would improve the initial limitations of the live recording.
     
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  3. Fastnbulbous

    Fastnbulbous Doubleplus Ungood

    Location:
    Washington DC USA
    I was listening to the radio yesterday, a classical station that picks up this syndicated show where a selected caller is asked to identify a piece of music that's played in a completely different style by a pianist. The song went on for quite a while, and I couldn't for the life of me detect anything in what the guy was playing. I actually got irritated as the song droned on and on, and returned to what I was doing ... when suddenly it hit me. It was a Cat Stevens song called "Morning Has Broken", which I doubt I've heard more than once in the past 25 years. Anyway, the caller was totally clueless, and the announcer said it was indeed a Cat Stevens tune, but couldn't remember the title. The pianist said it was an old English folk tune that Brahms incorporated in some work.

    No particular point to this vignette, just thought I'd share.
     
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  4. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    From Wikipedia: "Morning Has Broken" is a popular and well-known Christian hymn first published in 1931. It has words by English author Eleanor Farjeon and was inspired by the village of Alfriston in East Sussex, then set to a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune known as "Bunessan" (it shares this tune with the 19th century Christmas Carol "Child in the Manger"). It is often sung in children's services and in funeralservices.

    English pop musician and folk singer Cat Stevens included a version on his 1971 album Teaser and the Firecat. The song became identified with Stevens due to the popularity of this recording. It reached number six on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, number one on the U.S. easy listening chart in 1972,[4] and number four on the Canadian RPM Magazine charts.

    [End quotation]

    I'm not aware of any work by Brahms incorporating the tune--although that certainly doesn't mean anything conclusive. I live in the DC area; what station was it, and what program? I didn't know either of the local NPR affiliates ran anything like that, although WBJC has a knockoff of the old "Music at First Hearing" program called "Face the Music."
     
  5. Fastnbulbous

    Fastnbulbous Doubleplus Ungood

    Location:
    Washington DC USA
    Thanks for the info... I wish I could remember when it came on. This was a Charlottesville station (WTJU-FM) but I'm pretty sure the program was syndicated. Brahms was definitely part of the answer the caller was challenged to find, but I forget which piece it was incorporated in.
     
  6. JuniorMaineGuide

    JuniorMaineGuide Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Thanks for the info. It's too bad about the set being so hard to find.

    re: Pascal Quartet Beethoven, I was lucky to find all of the individual LP's in a Goodwill one day and was attracted by the awesome charcoal portrait of LvB. But if you are interested, it is relatively easy to find the complete set in a box by Classics Record Library. I have seen them in the used bins more than a few times.
     
  7. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Now enjoying this fine set.
     
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  8. JuniorMaineGuide

    JuniorMaineGuide Forum Resident

    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Listened to two excellent recordings today that were at one point or another recommended on this thread:

    [​IMG]

    Alban Berg: String Quartet and Lyric Suite. Arditti Quartet / Montaigne.

    [​IMG]

    Debussy: Complete solo piano music. Gordon Fergus-Thompson / ASV.

    I got the 5-disc set which was produced in the UK in the late 80's and when I got home and opened it, it looked like the CDs had bronzed! Luckily they all played through and ripped without problems.
     
    George P likes this.
  9. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Ohh! I don't have that one, though Arditti's Schoenberg is superb!

    Whew!! Glad to hear your set is OK. I just checked mine and no bronzing. I left it out for a spin later today or tomorrow.
     
  10. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
  11. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
  12. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
  13. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    [​IMG]

    Enjoying ore from this set (CD 2) tonight. Great performance and sound.
     
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  14. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Finishing listening to the Sibelius symphonies conducted by Rozhdestvensky issued by Melodiya.
     
    George P likes this.
  15. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    Now, on to a relisten of the wonderful set of Ralph Vaughan Williams symphonies conducted by Rozhdestvensky and issued on CD by Melodiya.
     
  16. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Is this from a big Rozdestvensky set?
     
  17. Daedalus

    Daedalus I haven't heard it all.....

    No a small box set issued by Melodiya a bout 3 years ago. Still available from amazon( possibly others). I would post a picture but I can’t figure out how to do it on here.
     
    George P likes this.
  18. Bachtoven

    Bachtoven Forum Resident

    Location:
    Davis, CA
    Yes, he has to use a violin bow in Henze's "Memorias de El Cimarron:--not my favorite piece (largely due to the narration in German), but the rest of the piece are good.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    As I wrote in my first post which appeared in the Classical "Mega" CD Box Sets thread -

    :tiphat: - To the thread starter and everyone who has participated for the esprit de corps shown within the posts - very impressive and a refreshing change of pace and style from my previous forum...

    Allow me to introduce myself to one and all with one of my favourite works - one that, for me, transcends both time and space - especially the andante assai second movement...

    I've included links to each of the three movements should anyone wish to listen...

    Note: the original post that I wrote used a photograph of the album and each of the three movements should have appeared as links rather than as an embedded video followed by two links. My apologies if the embedded video causes bandwidth issues for anyone. And if someone could advise me as to how to insert links that appear as print rather than the actual video I would be quite grateful for the kindness.



    Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No.2 in G minor, Op.63 - 2. Andante assai

    Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No.2 in G minor, Op.63 - 3. Allegro, ben marcato

    And for the record my name actually is "Donny Brook" - I was born Donald Stuart Brook - but everyone (including my own family!) has always referred to me as "Donny Brook" as if it were one word and not two - :laugh:

    Allow me to express best wishes to all!
     
  20. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    Welcome to the thread! Please do settle in and stay a spell. Are you a violin maven? We have lots of pianophiles (including yours truly), but I think fewer whose first love is the violin. Fortunately, we're pretty laid back; I don't think you'll find the two engaging in any, uh, donnybrooks. ;)
     
    George P likes this.
  21. Donny Brook

    Donny Brook Forum Resident

    Thank you for the warm welcome and while I am indeed one whose first love is the violin I too am pretty laid back - I'm not exactly the most discerning of members as I tend to find something of interest in everything and I'm not one to criticize that which may not be to my taste.

    "To each his own, eh?... "

    "Live and let live, eh?... "

    "You go your way and I'll go mine, eh?... "

    "So let's leave it alone 'cause we can't see eye to eye
    There ain't no good guy, there ain't no bad guy
    There's only you and me and we just disagree"... eh?

    Latest listening release - (kind of on a Prokofiev kick for reasons which escape even me) -

    Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 5 in G major, Op. 55 -
    • BBC Philharmonic
    • Gianandrea Noseda
    • Jean-Efflam Bavouzet (piano)
    [​IMG]
     
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  22. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    Same to you, Donny Brook! Nice to have you on the thread. I don't think I have very many recordings of the Prokofiev Violin Concerto, but I love the piano concertos. I have 3 sets of them - Beroff, Browning and Ashkenazy. I have Gergiev and Ozawa's recordings of the symphonies, but really need to listen to them more.

    And welcome to the thread! This past October marked 10 years since I started it. I had been on this forum awhile and like you, participated in classical forums in the past. I wanted a place here at SHMF to post about classical music recordings/works/composers/performers I enjoyed, listened to, saw live, purchased and recommended. One of the things I liked about this site is the moderation, which helps us stay on this topic.
     
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  23. George P

    George P Warm Sound Thread Starter

    Location:
    NYC
    :)

    (Had to look up that last word.)
     
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  24. drh

    drh Talking Machine

    I blush to confess I'm not that familiar with the Prokofiev vln. cti., but this may be of interest: David Oistrakh recorded the first with the composer conducting. I have two copies, both on LP, but only one really worth owning. That one is on a '50s label called Colosseum (trademark was a picture of the ruined Colosseum in Rome with the motto "Only Great Art Survives"--and the label didn't), one of those little American all-classical labels that used to pop up now and again, none successfully, with a business plan of making a living on reissuing masters from the then Soviet Union for Western music lovers. The other is on Everest from its post-Belock days, which, with its typical discerning standards, saw fit to reissue this workaday example of '50s Communist Bloc mono in--fake quad. Ugh!

    As to no. 2, as far as I know the first commercial recording of the piece, at least in the Americas, was by Jascha Heifetz with Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston SO. On the same day they recorded the Brahms. Unfortunately, Victor's recording engineers set the recording lathes running too fast, meaning the records would play flat. The Brahms they redid the next day; they knew in that thrice-familiar work the defect would be noticed. The Prokofiev, on the other hand, was wet-on-the-page modern at the time, and Victor issued it at the wrong speed as set M 450 (the form in which I have it) on the theory nobody knew the piece well enough to catch the blunder.

    The BBC Music Magazine issued a concert recording of the latter work by its dedicatee, Robert Soetens, with Sir Henry Wood conducting the BBC SO, recorded 12-20-1936. Dunno how hard that one is to get now, and also dunno how readily the Oistrakh no. 1 can be had on CD, although I presume it must have been issued in that format at some point.
     
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  25. Åke Bergvall

    Åke Bergvall Forum Resident

    Location:
    Karlstad, Sweden
    That recording with the composer conducting sounds intriguing, but is not included in either of the two Oistrakh boxes readily available. While both the EMI and DG boxes include early mono recordings of Concerto no. 1, they are with Kondrashin conducting the USSR State Symphony Orchestra (1953, DG) and Matacic conducting the LSO (1954, EMI). By then Prokofiev was no longer able to conduct, having died on March 5 1953, the same day as Stalin.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
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